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Old 07-04-2022, 06:26 AM
 
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The actual individual consumption (AIC) per capita in dollars adjusted for purchasing power (PPP) for OECD countries.

Here are the top 10 for 2019:

1. United States: 47,815
2. Luxembourg: 43,475
3. Norway: 37,341
4. Switzerland: 35,695
5. Germany: 35,588
6. Austria: 34,343
7. United Kingdom: 33,948
8. Denmark: 33,760
9. Netherlands: 33,539
10. Canada: 33,507

Source: https://stats.oecd.org/

Here is the full list.

For more information about actual individual consumption see here.
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Old 07-04-2022, 08:26 AM
 
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Americans consume 40% more than Canadians. Does that make you fee more satisfied? When you visit Canada, can you see the difference? Only three to a family, instead of four?
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:23 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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There is nothing wrong with consuming more, as long as your budget allows. Consuming goods provides jobs.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
Americans consume 40% more than Canadians. Does that make you fee more satisfied? When you visit Canada, can you see the difference? Only three to a family, instead of four?
Since the value is on a per capita base, the size of a family doesn't matter here. But if you ask me whether I see a difference between Canada and the United States? Not so much. I would even argue, that Canadian cities are better maintained and that it has less poor people. Those numbers don't tell us anything about the distribution of the consumption anyway. There may be more McMansions, more yachts and golf courses or other little toys for the rich in the US that explain the difference. On the other hand, Canadians may have a more frugal lifestyle and there is nothing wrong with it.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
There is nothing wrong with consuming more, as long as your budget allows. Consuming goods provides jobs.
I am not so sure the budget allows it. A lot of inflated assets in the US.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
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I consume far more than I need to be happy. I don't consider it a good thing so much as a bad habit. I would never be a minimalist, but I know I over consume everything from food to toys. There is no right number, but there is the concept of moderation.
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Old 07-05-2022, 09:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnerwetter View Post
Since the value is on a per capita base, the size of a family doesn't matter here. But if you ask me whether I see a difference between Canada and the United States? Not so much. I would even argue, that Canadian cities are better maintained and that it has less poor people. Those numbers don't tell us anything about the distribution of the consumption anyway. There may be more McMansions, more yachts and golf courses or other little toys for the rich in the US that explain the difference. On the other hand, Canadians may have a more frugal lifestyle and there is nothing wrong with it.
There aren't many things that are consumed uniformly by adults and children. Very few people, in any country, consume goods or services as isolated ndividuals. If you are seeking a realistic and meaningful picture, it is more indicative to visualize consumption per purchasing unit, which is family or household.
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Old 07-06-2022, 03:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
There aren't many things that are consumed uniformly by adults and children. Very few people, in any country, consume goods or services as isolated ndividuals. If you are seeking a realistic and meaningful picture, it is more indicative to visualize consumption per purchasing unit, which is family or household.
The "per capita" measure is the gold standard for many metrics like GDP. "Per household/family" has the problem, that a household/family size can vary.
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Old 07-06-2022, 04:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
There aren't many things that are consumed uniformly by adults and children. Very few people, in any country, consume goods or services as isolated ndividuals. If you are seeking a realistic and meaningful picture, it is more indicative to visualize consumption per purchasing unit, which is family or household.

No, it has the problem that it is inexact. We can know the exact number of "capitas" and precisely define a capita. Sadly, statisticians overestimate the capacity of users to use common sense when interpreting the stats.
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Old 07-06-2022, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
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This is an old assessment, but I doubt it changed much over the years:
https://www.thestar.com/business/201...ly_report.html


Canadians are more focused on what they need: non-discretionary items including housing and food.
Americans have higher per capita income and more wealth than Canadians.
It also takes a lot more to be in the top 1 per cent (the wealthiest) in the U.S. than it does in Canada. The one-percenters in the U.S. earn much more than those in the top 1 per cent in Canada.
It really speaks to the different consumer bases between the two countries.

I wonder if that high spending in the US has something to do with the price for education and health care they pay.
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