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Old 02-23-2023, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Taipei
8,866 posts, read 8,448,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestCoast714 View Post
Is that because Of Greece's perpetual economic collapse? Ala Argentina?

I haven't been to Athens. Does it have a lot of beggars or what?
Poor infrastructure, lots of trash etc. You can Google "Athens is a dump" or "Greece is so dirty" and you'd get thousands of similar complaints in the results.
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Old 02-23-2023, 09:34 PM
 
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Starr County, Texas, has about 100 Census Designated Places, that are almost indistinguishable from villages across the border in Mexico. Populations range from a few dozen to several hundred, virtually no-one speaks English. None are visible from US-83. Per capita incomes are around $5,000.
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Old 02-24-2023, 04:51 PM
 
211 posts, read 120,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
I prefer to compare cities. Less Developed nation: More Developed nation

Tijuana / Ciudad Juárez : St. Louis
Cape Town : Baltimore
Caracas : New Orleans
Kingston : Memphis
Culiacan : Detroit

Interestingly, the most dangerous cities in the world are in nations considered to be more developed.
Venezuala is basically a borderline failed state at this point. I wouldn't bother with their stats.

As for Cape Town, it can't quite compare because it's a metro wide problem. The City Bowl and north and south suburbs is prolly safer than Baltimore, but the flats are vastly worse.

Memphis is quite bad though.

STL is also tiny compared to Tijuana although it posts similar stats to some smaller mexican cities
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Old 02-25-2023, 04:47 AM
 
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How do you define "resembles"? I've been in half the third-world capital. Never saw a crime. Lived in New Orleans inner city for some years. Never saw a crime. The lack of resemblance, New Orleans to Lagos/Guatemala/Dhaka is pretty obvious, but crimes doesn't figure in the equation.

What does an American city look like? A street of mobil-homes, three cars in front of each one. Where do see that in the third world?.

Why do you think people in poor countries commit so many crimes, that only crime-infested American citiies "resemble" them?
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Old 02-25-2023, 06:29 AM
 
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Definitely Detroit, MI for big cities and South Fulton, GA for smaller cities.
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Old 02-25-2023, 09:40 AM
 
211 posts, read 120,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
How do you define "resembles"? I've been in half the third-world capital. Never saw a crime. Lived in New Orleans inner city for some years. Never saw a crime. The lack of resemblance, New Orleans to Lagos/Guatemala/Dhaka is pretty obvious, but crimes doesn't figure in the equation.

What does an American city look like? A street of mobil-homes, three cars in front of each one. Where do see that in the third world?.

Why do you think people in poor countries commit so many crimes, that only crime-infested American citiies "resemble" them?
I think that's a complicated question.

In say...... Kenya... crime isn't that serious. Kenya is quite a bit poorer than South Africa and South African crime can be brutal. You see similar crime in South America, but I'd say petty crime is lower (house break ins and so forth). So I think it's a mix of desperation, class/racial tension, and massive wealth gaps.

South Africa and most of Latin America have this. Obviously you have war zones though (DCR in many areas, Liberia 15-20 some years ago, Somalia until semi recently arguably, etc) and you have countries with a crime problem.

US crime can be traced back to its aspects of colonialism. Its wealth divide. Its racial tensions and its relative lack of infrastructure and safety net programs that encourage upward mobilty (instead they encourage continued poverty)

It has some commonalities with countries like South Africa and Brazil, but without the lopsided racial figures of South Africa.


I wouldn't really compare US cities to cities where relatively little infrastructure was ever built to begin with (Lagos, Dakka, etc) South America and South Africa would be more comparable. -Decent infrastructure that is decaying and or needs expansion.


Out of those New Orleans fits the bill the most. The violence is a state wide problem, as is the corruption, and as it the poverty. It resembles Salvador Brazil in many ways.
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Old 02-25-2023, 08:20 PM
 
5,743 posts, read 3,603,829 times
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In many poor countries, like Kenya, crime prevention is privatized. There is no reliance on Police to deter police. A shopkeeper hires a security guard, who lives in the back of the shop, sleeps all day, sits in the doorway all night with a hardhat, a baseball bat (no guns) and a kerosene stove to make his tea. Every shop has one, and there is no crime -- in his doorway..

My friends in Bogota parked their car in the living room, behind a curtain, a common architectural feature. In Mexico city, the beat cop gets a subscription from the residents -- no pay, he looks the other way.

Criminality is probably inborn in a tiny but uniform number across all societies. Another small number is opportunistic, will help themselves to that which tilted their way, but will stop short of violence. But the vast majority, like you and me, will hand a stranger's dropped wallet back to him.

Societies have different ways of dealing with their criminal element, and statistically high crime is usuallu a measure of this response's inefficacy.
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Old 02-26-2023, 07:49 AM
 
211 posts, read 120,356 times
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Still different cultures. South Africa guy with baseball bat has a high chance of being Fn murdered. Kenya much less so. Some places have more of a culture of violence. Peru doesn’t have a huge culture of violence for example. Brazil does in many places. But again that varies. Culture of violence in São Paulo is much less entrenched than say Fortaleza.
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Old 02-27-2023, 07:31 PM
 
881 posts, read 923,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
In many poor countries, like Kenya, crime prevention is privatized. There is no reliance on Police to deter police. A shopkeeper hires a security guard, who lives in the back of the shop, sleeps all day, sits in the doorway all night with a hardhat, a baseball bat (no guns) and a kerosene stove to make his tea. Every shop has one, and there is no crime -- in his doorway..

My friends in Bogota parked their car in the living room, behind a curtain, a common architectural feature. In Mexico city, the beat cop gets a subscription from the residents -- no pay, he looks the other way.

Criminality is probably inborn in a tiny but uniform number across all societies. Another small number is opportunistic, will help themselves to that which tilted their way, but will stop short of violence. But the vast majority, like you and me, will hand a stranger's dropped wallet back to him.

Societies have different ways of dealing with their criminal element, and statistically high crime is usuallu a measure of this response's inefficacy.

First time I heard of such a thing, as a lower middle class Colombian. Can't even imagine how could you park a car in a living room. I've seen bikes in living rooms, tho'.
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Old 02-28-2023, 08:04 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
10,219 posts, read 15,931,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestCoast714 View Post
Is that because Of Greece's perpetual economic collapse? Ala Argentina?

I haven't been to Athens. Does it have a lot of beggars or what?
Argentina is a Third World country to me. I also question whether Greece really is a First World country anymore. I would say for places that are clearly in First World countries....Detroit, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Laredo and. Brownsville TX. And obviously parts but not all of Chicago, the Islamic banlieues of Paris, and London's East End. And Belfast, Northern Ireland because of the tension and conflict. They are engaged in ethnic and religious conflict in a way not typical of the First World.
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