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Old 06-30-2023, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Taipei
8,864 posts, read 8,435,567 times
Reputation: 7413

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I sound like Kate Middleton thank you very much.
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Old 06-30-2023, 02:07 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
26,656 posts, read 28,659,091 times
Reputation: 50525
Interesting topic.

New England born and bred. Any accent test I've taken online says I come from NY state or the midwest or that I have no accent at all, just Standard American Accent.

I come from the Connecticut River Valley area of MA, not the Boston area out east. The CT River divides Vermont from New Hampshire, then sweeps down through MA and then down through CT to the ocean at Old Saybrook. It was important in New England history and my mother's side of the family has lived alongside this river since at least 1700, from Saybrook to northern Vermont.

Last year I pinpointed someone I met in CT as not coming from that area and, to my amazement, I was right. Turned out she was born in the same CT River city as I was: Springfield, MA. I still can't tell how I knew her accent was just a tiny bit different but there was something about it.

I think I speak the same as people in the CT River city of Northampton, MA, my mother's hometown too. If I follow the CT River up through Vermont, I don't know if I speak the same way.

Mix that with a few vocabulary words from my dad's English family but that doesn't really matter much unless you're using those words. I SOUND like I'm from the CT River Valley and I am. I may lapse into actual words that my English side used to say, like trousers for pants or bottom (instead of "behind" or "butt), "wee wee" instead of "pee" and I'll use the north of England word that my cousins taught me: "knackered" for "tired" but all in all, apparently it's just a plain ordinary American accent. I do not think most New Englanders speak with a Boston accent!!!!!!!!
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Old 07-01-2023, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,340 posts, read 63,918,476 times
Reputation: 93266
I grew up in MA…Worcester, but lived in the Midwest for most of my adult life. Now I live in the Deep South. I think I pick up words and phrases from where ever I go, but the Worcester stays with me wherever I go.

I can differentiate Worcester from Boston or Springfield from across a room. I overheard a man in Hilton Head talking in a parking lot. I yelled, “Worcester, right?” and he laughed a said, “Yup.”
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Old 07-01-2023, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Habsburg Lands of Old
908 posts, read 441,006 times
Reputation: 790
As a native English speaker ( originally ) from the Philadelphia suburbs who speaks Hungarian at a close to fluent level , I'd probably say ( based upon what I've been told ) that I speak English with a standard American accent and Hungarian with an American/slight Southern Transdanubian accent , which has grown on me in recent years .

I'm also currently in the process of brushing up on my Serbo-Croatian skills , and those who've bothered to comment on what I sound like when speaking it have mentioned that I sound like an American who's attempting to pass himself off as a Hungarian or vice versa , which is something of a true to life description .
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Old 07-02-2023, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,803 posts, read 2,225,171 times
Reputation: 2304
I speak mainly with a Southwestern Ontario accent, but have some Detroit/Michigan influences, which almost always get pointed out when I travel to other parts of Canada.
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Old 07-02-2023, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
12,946 posts, read 13,330,473 times
Reputation: 14005
Being a military (US Army) brat up until the age of 14, I don’t have any accent…..even after living in Texas since 1959.
My wife, born in California and moved to Texas in 1949, has a slight Texas “twang” accent.
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Old 07-03-2023, 03:00 PM
 
Location: USA
626 posts, read 1,239,768 times
Reputation: 503
English is not my mother tongue, South American (Ecuador) Spanish is.
Having lived in different states due to military and career moves, I've picked up and used different accents accordingly and they have stayed with me.
Growing up in Miami, picked up Cuban/Caribean accents/speak, picked up Tejano along the way while living in Texas (San Antonio), drinking Big Reds and dancing Mexican cumbias and polkas. Living in SE Alabama, I often used local phrases when visiting family in Miami; eg: y'all , bless his/her heart, yes Ma'am, No Ma'am, etc.
On a side note, while in S. Korea, and while being married to a Korean I picked up what I call Amorean (AMerican/kOREAN) English. More better, more worst, Yobo, Aeegooo, etc.

Carry on

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Old 07-04-2023, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,340 posts, read 63,918,476 times
Reputation: 93266
My granddaughter took French in high school. In college, she went on a medical mission trip where they spoke Spanish, but they told her she spoke Spanish with a French accent.
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Old 07-04-2023, 12:51 PM
 
Location: SE UK
14,820 posts, read 12,016,192 times
Reputation: 9813
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Interesting topic.

New England born and bred. Any accent test I've taken online says I come from NY state or the midwest or that I have no accent at all, just Standard American Accent.

I come from the Connecticut River Valley area of MA, not the Boston area out east. The CT River divides Vermont from New Hampshire, then sweeps down through MA and then down through CT to the ocean at Old Saybrook. It was important in New England history and my mother's side of the family has lived alongside this river since at least 1700, from Saybrook to northern Vermont.

Last year I pinpointed someone I met in CT as not coming from that area and, to my amazement, I was right. Turned out she was born in the same CT River city as I was: Springfield, MA. I still can't tell how I knew her accent was just a tiny bit different but there was something about it.

I think I speak the same as people in the CT River city of Northampton, MA, my mother's hometown too. If I follow the CT River up through Vermont, I don't know if I speak the same way.

Mix that with a few vocabulary words from my dad's English family but that doesn't really matter much unless you're using those words. I SOUND like I'm from the CT River Valley and I am. I may lapse into actual words that my English side used to say, like trousers for pants or bottom (instead of "behind" or "butt), "wee wee" instead of "pee" and I'll use the north of England word that my cousins taught me: "knackered" for "tired" but all in all, apparently it's just a plain ordinary American accent. I do not think most New Englanders speak with a Boston accent!!!!!!!!
That's funny because I have absolutely no accent myself, nor do the people that come from the same part of the world I come from.
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Old 07-07-2023, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Madrid
1,049 posts, read 1,605,835 times
Reputation: 1229
I was born and raised in rural western New York, so while I wasn't really concious of my accent back then, I suppose I had the classic 'Buffalo accent,' overpronouncing vowel sounds like 'o' in rock (rahhhk) or the 'a' in apple (ayaple). I've since moved around quite a bit. I went to college in Northern California, then lived in Hawaii for a bit (with a short stint in the UK). After a few years, my accent had neutralized quite a bit, to where I had a very 'general American accent,' which I think is quite standard of Northern California/ Pacific Northwest - nothing too pecularliar or noticeable about it. The accent my family has sounds like nails on a chalkboard to me now.

Now, I've been living in Spain for going on 10 years, and when I speak English, I generally do so around non-native speakers. I've developed a bit more of an international dialect and vernacular. I annunciate more, generally use less slang, and catch myself using a lot of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euro_English. I sometimes catch myself structuring a sentence, or using a strange word order - partly because I speak a lot of Spanish, but partly because, as I said, I talk a lot with non-native speakers and I'm used to hearing something said in a certain way. I also have had a lot of Brit and Australian friends over the years, so when I do use more colloquialisms, I borrow a lot from those dialects. I think my accent is still quite obviously 'general American,' but I've gotten a lot of comments that I don't 'sound like a normal American.'

In Spanish, I still have some sort of accent (compared to native speakers from Madrid). Once again, I've gotten a lot of comments that my accent doesn't sound typically American, but they're not quite sure what it is. I think I probably sound like a slightly-off Spanish person - maybe like when you hear someone speak whose accent almost sounds natural, but there's a slight twang that you can't quite put your finger on? I do, strangely enough, get asked on a very regular basis if I'm Italian - more than from anywhere else. Maybe that has to do with my appearance (I have no Italian ancestry but my personal style could definitely appear Italian) but I suspect I might have a slight Italian twang when I speak Spanish, because in addition to being asked if I'm Italian, it's frequent that people will just start talking with me in Italian

I also speak a decent level of German - my partner is German, so I speak it a lot when we're around her family. My accent is definitely the least refined in German, but it's also the language I have the least fluency in. I've been told I sound rather Dutch when I speak German, which I suppose makes sense, as the Dutch language pronunciation has a lot of English sounding aspects to it.
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