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Old 07-10-2023, 05:58 PM
 
Location: USA
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I am an anglophone and I learned French from a Québécoise. When I go to Paris, they usually ask if I am Canadian (or sometimes Belgian!).

When I am in the provinces, they either can't detect the source of my accent, or they don't care enough to comment.
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Old 11-19-2023, 10:01 PM
 
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I started this thread a few months ago because I thought it would be a fun topic to discuss because I know my accent has modified a bit over the years and because my daughter, who is learning how to speak, has many different influences that affect her accent.

For my daughter, she is influence by my American accent and my wife's Malaysian Indian accent. Her daycare providers are Chinese, Indian, Malay and Filipino. We have friends from all over the world. We live in Malaysia.

She's almost two and she's starting to turn into a chatterbox, sometimes saying real words and other times saying gibberish.

Her accent is all over the place:

She says "car" like a Bostonian (without the R)
She says sentences like she's Chinese (with tones that go up and down)
She says "nice" like she's Borat.
And she sometimes mixes Malay into her English.
And my Tamil-Indian mother in law keeps telling her to call her mother "Ama".

I look forward to seeing where accent/dialect goes in the next few years!
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Old 11-20-2023, 07:12 PM
 
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Oh, that's really interesting! I'm actually from the UK, but I've lived in the US for the past 5 years. I still have my British accent, but I've definitely picked up some American slang and phrases. It's funny how living in a different country can change the way you speak. I've also noticed that some people here struggle to understand my accent at times, especially when I say certain words. But overall, I think it's been a great experience and I love learning about different languages and cultures.
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Old 11-21-2023, 12:25 AM
 
1,040 posts, read 682,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmik&3 View Post
Oh, that's really interesting! I'm actually from the UK, but I've lived in the US for the past 5 years. I still have my British accent, but I've definitely picked up some American slang and phrases. It's funny how living in a different country can change the way you speak. I've also noticed that some people here struggle to understand my accent at times, especially when I say certain words. But overall, I think it's been a great experience and I love learning about different languages and cultures.
Do you have kids growing up in the US? I've observed that in certain circumstances kids tend to pick up the accents of their friends over parents, but I sometimes find a strange racial element to it.

For example, my friend who is half Malay-half British, who grew up in Malaysia, and sounds English when she talks (at least to me she does). Same is true with a mixed American/Malaysian woman I met a while back. She grew up in Malaysia, but she sounds American to me when she speaks English, not Malaysian.

But when I meet the kids of Brits in America, they tend to sound American and vice versa.

When I go back to the Boston area, people tell me I've "lost my Boston accent." It's funny, because I never remember having one. I pronounced my Rs just like my out of state parents did. I did use a lot of New England slang, but not so much the pronunciation.

My British former colleague was from the SE of England (can't remember where) and she told me she's lost her local accent. She told me that when she goes back people sometimes think she's American lol.
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