U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-18-2008, 10:57 AM
 
62,997 posts, read 53,866,040 times
Reputation: 18886

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by once-upon-chicago View Post
I lived in Beijing, China, from '85 to '87 when the doors to the world had only been opened for a short time. Things were much different in China in the '80's then they are now. For example, there were many fewer cars on the road (I knew of not one person who actually owned their own car; most cars were state owned) and making a telephone call overseas was easier than making one across town, provided you could actually find a telephone. Now it seems many people own cars and everyone has a cell phone. At the same time the focus on friendships was conversation not activity so the primary form of entertainment was to meeting over coffee or beer to just talk.

With this said I had a harder time with culture shock traveling back to the US. The plethora of 24-hour stores and eateries was too much to bear. And who would think product choice could be so disturbing & time consuming? Not to mention a perceived superficiality in the US compared to other countries that was hard for me to deal with (I was 20) I think it took 6 months for me to really crawl out of my shell.
Quite interesting.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-18-2008, 11:19 AM
 
Location: London
200 posts, read 975,004 times
Reputation: 110
When I was 15 my family moved from Australia to San Diego for a year. My first day at High school in San Diego was a massive culture shock. It was almost like a different planet. I pretty much wanted to step on the first plane back home. But the next day became easier and I ended up loving it. But it certainly took a lot of getting used to.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,041 posts, read 13,950,393 times
Reputation: 2327
My culture shock came within the USA. I grew up within the city of Chicago (no suburbs) among people from around the world. Most people I knew(including my family) growing up did not speak English as their first language. I had only one or two actual American friends, everyone else was from another country. When I was 18, I moved with my military husband to Meridian MS. From there, we moved to Cherry Point, NC.

The culture shock was HUGE (and, some 30 years later, is still going on somewhat). I had never been around that many Americans before, certainly not military and not Southerners. Very few people spoke any other language than Southern slang. Everything was spread out, there was no such thing as "walking to the corner store". Everyone wanted to talk to you (why?) and were unnaturally friendly. Underlying that "friendliness" is a certain amount of backstabbing and shallowness. You really cannot trust anyone as being your true friend. People actually carry guns and hunt things.... It was (is) another planet. Appearances are everything. Substance means nothing. People move so much slower and are unreliable. There is more prejuice against anyone/anything "different".

As you can tell, I have never really gotten over the culture shock. I have adapted, but, I stay pretty much to myself. My friends here are almost all other transplanted Chicagoans or northerners. I have very few Southern friends. I tried, for years to adapt and blend in, but, was labled "too much of a Yankee" no matter what I did, so, I stopped trying.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 02:00 PM
 
Location: When will Hell Freeze Phoenix, AZ
287 posts, read 843,958 times
Reputation: 210
Default Culture shock w/in our own countries

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagocubs View Post
My culture shock came within the USA. I grew up within the city of Chicago (no suburbs) among people from around the world. Most people I knew(including my family) growing up did not speak English as their first language. I had only one or two actual American friends, everyone else was from another country. When I was 18, I moved with my military husband to Meridian MS. From there, we moved to Cherry Point, NC.

The culture shock was HUGE (and, some 30 years later, is still going on somewhat). I had never been around that many Americans before, certainly not military and not Southerners. Very few people spoke any other language than Southern slang. Everything was spread out, there was no such thing as "walking to the corner store". Everyone wanted to talk to you (why?) and were unnaturally friendly. Underlying that "friendliness" is a certain amount of backstabbing and shallowness. You really cannot trust anyone as being your true friend. People actually carry guns and hunt things.... It was (is) another planet. Appearances are everything. Substance means nothing. People move so much slower and are unreliable. There is more prejuice against anyone/anything "different".

As you can tell, I have never really gotten over the culture shock. I have adapted, but, I stay pretty much to myself. My friends here are almost all other transplanted Chicagoans or northerners. I have very few Southern friends. I tried, for years to adapt and blend in, but, was labled "too much of a Yankee" no matter what I did, so, I stopped trying.
I was on the Zuni Reservation in NM a couple of weeks ago and talk about culture shock!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Crossville TN
179 posts, read 531,606 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
Believe it or not, it was a bit of a "culture shock in reverse" returning to the U.S. after being stationed in Germany for 8 years. Keeping my right foot off of the gas pedal took some getting used to. I had gotten used to such things as being called by "Mr." and my last name instead of the easy familiarity we enjoy back here. While we have some good restaurants here, I feel like Europeans take their dining out more seriously. And little things like tv commercials that didn't feature people wearing military uniforms!
You know we're fixing to move back as well and reading this get's me thinking how we'll feel going back home after havin been here.
I definitely would have to say I fear the same gas paddle issue Wonder if the cops would understand my problem with the "used to no speed limit"
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 04:26 PM
 
9,336 posts, read 20,683,356 times
Reputation: 4533
For me culture shock was moving back to N America from Oz. First thing I did was search for some Aussie comfort food - vegemite, tim tams, Coopers beer. Luckily here in Toronto I was able to find it. My first week back I have gone on the wrong side of the road on residential streets (quickly corrected). Hardest part was yearning to hear the aussie accent again so I end up listening to this australian country music that I brought back with me. But its getting better now. I can't not stop saying "no worries" and yesterday I used the term "brekkie" (breakfast). But I'm noticing Im starting to start saying things more Canadian.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 04:35 PM
 
Location: West LA
2,318 posts, read 7,422,123 times
Reputation: 1116
I went to a wedding in Cincinnati recently and we went down to northern Kentucky for the bachelor party... got some serious culture shock down there! I fixed it by getting back to Ohio as fast as possible.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2008, 08:08 PM
 
4,803 posts, read 10,130,905 times
Reputation: 3430
I experienced more culture shock from Georgia to San Diego, than I did moving to Japan. I think it may be more because I am half-Japanese and I'm familiar with the culture and can speak the language. I've also visited Japan growing up so it's kind of a second home for me. I'm sure the average Georgian would exerience culture shock in Japan. San Diego is nothing like Japan either, no matter how much they try to compare it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2008, 04:19 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
9,832 posts, read 15,959,030 times
Reputation: 13113
I guess some could say there was a bit of culture shock moving from the US to UK but I think it depends on your definition of culture shock. To me, the term kind of has a negative association and I wouldn't say living in England is generally negative. There is an adjustment period where you have to get used to everything that is different but I wasn't really "shocked" by any of it and different doesn't always mean bad.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2008, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Winfield, WV
1,946 posts, read 3,775,417 times
Reputation: 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I guess some could say there was a bit of culture shock moving from the US to UK but I think it depends on your definition of culture shock. To me, the term kind of has a negative association and I wouldn't say living in England is generally negative. There is an adjustment period where you have to get used to everything that is different but I wasn't really "shocked" by any of it and different doesn't always mean bad.
I like that explanation.

I went from a mostly white small town growing up to predominatly african-american college where i was the minority. It took me a full semester to adjust to living on campus amongst so many different people. I think it helped develop me into a better person.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top