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Old 07-24-2009, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Alaska & Florida
1,629 posts, read 5,386,309 times
Reputation: 837

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders15 View Post
I know racism is everywhere.. but they vary in many degrees or just not be racism as all. What are some good countries that are not strict/racist towards blacks or foreigners in general?

From what I read "foreigners" are usually treated with caution and black people are usually treated with "discrimination" in the same event. Usually because they have not seen a black person before, or the ones that they have seen just cause trouble. Like Japan I hear does not care for foreigners (outside of tourism) but I hear places like Germany are not as bad.

I am just looking for a country that will allow me to have as much as a good time as possible without hitting many barriers. I am a free spirited person and to me it does not seem fair if I as a foreigner, took the years to learn about a place and still can't go here or do that.

I am looking for a country to study for my class and I am told I would have to also live there for a while. I am worried about the reception because I am black, but otherwise I think I will be fine because I am professional & respectful. Do any fellow Americans know of good countries, or places within good countries where we are welcomed?
Depends on how you act and if you pull the race card out every second you get.

I have an AA friend who lives in Gold Coast, Australia and loves it and one who lived in various cities in Japan and REALLY loved it.
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Old 07-24-2009, 03:53 AM
 
3,210 posts, read 4,617,798 times
Reputation: 4314
I have to be honest about something here: What's with this recent trend of AA's wanting to move to Europe? It's not a bad thing, but it's just something i'm curious about. Do you really honestly believe the cure to finding acceptance is to be in a place that's even whiter? I don't get it.

</waits to get flamed off site>
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:03 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,809 posts, read 26,581,592 times
Reputation: 6790
I don't know that it's a recent trend. Richard Wright, Charlie Parker, Josephine Baker, et alia all went to Europe. Now when they went to Europe Jim Crow was still in effect in many states so it might have made more sense than today. Still Tina Turner relocated to Europe in the 1980s. Nina Simone did in 1970, but I think hers had an element of protest about things in the US. (Things were still a tad turbulent in 1970)

Also it's not that unusual for talented people, regardless of race, to go to other nations or wonder how they'd do there. There's Mary Cassatt, T. S. Eliot, Henry James, Grace Kelly, Pierre Salinger, Gertrude Stein, Tori Amos, Monica Lewinsky. (Okay that last is for giggles, but Lewinsky does apparently live in London now) Enough so an episode of Home Movies joked about Melissa, Jason, and Brendan running away to Europe to be artists.
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,259 posts, read 43,235,571 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
I have to be honest about something here: What's with this recent trend of AA's wanting to move to Europe? It's not a bad thing, but it's just something i'm curious about. Do you really honestly believe the cure to finding acceptance is to be in a place that's even whiter? I don't get it.

</waits to get flamed off site>
I'd agree. Plus having lived in Europe for awhile myself...the Africans there seem to be in less good shape. I mean, while European countries "TALK" about how they are so amazing compared to Americans. The reality sometimes ranges to being SIGNIFICANTLY more different.

When you go to countries like Spain for example...and when you see Africans...they don't really seem to have a 'place' there. Same can be said for places like Austria, Switzerland, and others.

I think there are a few exceptions like France and the UK that were major players in empire building...and the citizens of the empires they 'conquered' are ending up back in their own lands now. So I think it is much easier to be black and go to a former colonial occupying country, like in the UK or France, and maybe not be that out of place as a potential citizen of that country. So in tht sense, being in Paris or London would probably be alright...but I doubt you'd be doing much better there than if you'd had gone to New York City or somewhere of equivalent nature - and you'd probably do better and have more citizen rights as well.

On the other hand, as a person who has lived outside of America for years, I think making a 'go' at living abroad is a great thing to do.
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:38 AM
 
512 posts, read 1,565,846 times
Reputation: 859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Would an African American living in Africa be an African American African?
And if a white man who was born and raised in, lets say, South Africa, and then moved to America, would he then be an "African American"?
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,259 posts, read 43,235,571 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgepl View Post
And if a white man who was born and raised in, lets say, South Africa, and then moved to America, would he then be an "African American"?
I've met a number of white South Africans in Korea/Japan...they get real frustrated about that real quick! I.E...particularly with Koreans & Japanese:

Korean: Where are you from?
white South African: South Africa.
Korean: You're not African. Where are you from?


Then they have to explain it everytime.
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Old 07-24-2009, 06:07 AM
 
7 posts, read 31,965 times
Reputation: 27
I have to agree with you Tiger. Actually most European countries do not "accept" too well anyone who is a foreigner, not especifically "blacks" but outsiders in general (not talking about when you go to those countries as a tourist...). Folks in those countries, especially of Nordic origin tend to think that they are "superior". They are extremely protective of their territory in what it respects to who does "not belong" in there. It's not that they are bad people, it's the type of the traditional culture they have been enrooted into. But true, UK and France became a little bit loosen up in this aspect and all due to the massive foreign (especially from northern Africa, India and Asia/HongKong especially) immigration during the past dozens of years. This created a kind of a melting pot. When this happens, a nation somehow loses part of its original identity...Anyhow, I continue to say, let's not allow differences to stop us from getting to know our world, its people and cultures. It's such a blessing to get to know each other and each other's interests, regardless of how friendly or arrogant some folks may seem to be.
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Old 07-24-2009, 06:49 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,809 posts, read 26,581,592 times
Reputation: 6790
I don't know historically Europeans have been accepting of African American celebrities and people with money. Even the Nordics. If the OP is a millionaire, well-respected musician, or professional athlete (or married to one) a move to Europe could be kind-of fun.
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Old 07-24-2009, 07:26 AM
 
3,282 posts, read 5,206,907 times
Reputation: 1936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babooshka View Post
I have to agree with you Tiger. Actually most European countries do not "accept" too well anyone who is a foreigner, not especifically "blacks" but outsiders in general (not talking about when you go to those countries as a tourist...). Folks in those countries, especially of Nordic origin tend to think that they are "superior". They are extremely protective of their territory in what it respects to who does "not belong" in there. It's not that they are bad people, it's the type of the traditional culture they have been enrooted into. But true, UK and France became a little bit loosen up in this aspect and all due to the massive foreign (especially from northern Africa, India and Asia/HongKong especially) immigration during the past dozens of years. This created a kind of a melting pot. When this happens, a nation somehow loses part of its original identity...Anyhow, I continue to say, let's not allow differences to stop us from getting to know our world, its people and cultures. It's such a blessing to get to know each other and each other's interests, regardless of how friendly or arrogant some folks may seem to be.
It's a stereotype that Nordic people buy into that superiority stuff. If anything from what I hear they are anti-racist to a fault. They're too accommodating if you ask me.

@ the OP

I say go for it! I'm going to university in France next fall. It's a good thing to be surrounded by another perspective. It's not as if other people in other parts of the world will treat you vastly differently, but their impressions of different peoples varies by their history with them. In America, with our history, there are obviously more tensions. In say, Japan, or Germany, where their experience is primarily with African American scholars, tourists, and servicemen(how they respond to this can vary), their view is on the whole less controversial. In Canada, it's also more positive even if not perfect. Britain seems like a different animal than the mainland. And France is a different animal than most of Europe. French attitudes toward immigrants are much, much more positive than the rest of Europe, especially the UK. When asked whether they thought immigration leads to more crime, 70% of French disagreed compared to about half of Europeans and Americans. 32% said that there were too many immigrants, the lowest in Europe. Compared to that, 16% said there were too few or they didn't know, and 52% said the amount was just right. Almost 70% of Brits said there was too much. Even French Muslims felt more French than British Muslims felt British.

In France, as most of Western Europe, you will be treated accordingly to how much you integrate into society. The French, like many in Europe, tend to believe that their ideals and way of life are to be imitated, especially in their own home country. It isn't as if they feel racially superior, as much as it is that they feel you should be very grateful for the rights conferred by living in France. It's very much an integrationist society rather than a multicultural one like Canada or America. Speaking the language without accent, dressing accordingly, holding the same basic ideals(secularism, egalitarianism, etc.) will go a long way for you.

The problems in most of Europe will be with the Muslims primarily, and recent immigrants(mostly illegal) from West and North Africa who are the most culturally different. You being American, they will not assume you are too culturally different and may even hold you in higher regard than blacks from Africa or Muslims. There is also the fact that you're from a rich country, so they don't see you so much as an economic migrant competing for labour and benefits.
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Old 07-24-2009, 08:27 AM
 
7 posts, read 31,965 times
Reputation: 27
Hoarfrost, you are correct in your comment. By the way, am not trying to stereotype, but just to share my view on what I've learned. I've lived in various countries of (not touring only): southeast Asia, southern Africa, southern and northern America and western, northern and southern Europe. But again, I say, differences should not be an obstacle for one to enjoy his or herself or to accomplish a goal. We are all human beings, with more this or that, there is always a reason behind everything, we just need to get to know, understand and respect them, then we will all be able to live in harmony with each other.
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