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Old 02-18-2010, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,336 posts, read 30,586,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Im from Michigan so Im aware of how much influence Germans have had on the upper midwest. A trip to Frankenmuth Michigan will showcase that fact. However our culture is much more influenced by our founding culture, the British. Number of imigrants asside, it is English we speak, english style laws we adopted. We also have a great deal in common with with other nations of the anglo saxon family, Canada Austraila NZ. The Germans have contributed greatly to our culture, but we still have an anglo based culture in the end.
These are good points.

I agree and know all about the diverse make-up of the U.S. population, however culture is about what is in your mind rather than about the blood that runs through your veins.

On this, the poster is absolutely right: the U.S., though obviously not a carbon copy of the U.K., is fundamentally an anglo-based culture.

If you talk to your average American who reads books, they will know James Clavell, William Shakespeare, John Le Carré and other British authors and won't likely know Thomas Mann or Gunther Grass just because they are of German origin and from Pennsylvania, or Stieg Larsson if they are of Swedish origin and born and raised in Minnesota.

The same goes with music, all the way from nursery rhymes to modern popular music.

And with movies as well - if an average American has seen a non-American film in his/her lifetime, it is probably a British movie like The Full Monty or Four Weddings and a Funeral, or an Australian film like Mad Max. Few German-Americans will have seen Der Untergang and few Polish-Americans I gather have ever seen (or even heard of) Quo Vadis.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,336 posts, read 30,586,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
The Normans were French!

The Quebecois, and other French Canadians, have very, very little in common with France! Quebec could be Anytown, USA, except that the signs are in French. Quebecers eat burgers and french fries, drive SUVs, shop in malls, play football and hockey, dress in "American-style" clothes, live in sprawled-out suburbs, and spend their vacations in Maine, Michigan, and Florida.
Quebec is actually more of a hybrid between Europe (mostly French influences, but also has some similarities to Scandinavia) and North America.

There was a thread on this a few months ago in the Canadian forum:
//www.city-data.com/forum/canad...h-america.html
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:58 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,600,777 times
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Canada is by far most like the US...one of the reasons the Right leaning folks hate it so.......

All the ethnic peoples that settled here in the US also came to Canada , maybe more so as relates to overall population. In one word or two , Canada is what the US wishes it was , socially liberal , fiscally conserative...it works.
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Old 02-18-2010, 05:51 PM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,355 posts, read 20,059,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
After living in London for a year, I have to agree that everyday life there is nothing like it is in the U.S. - night and day.
I couldn't disagree more. In fact my flat in London looks strikingly like my building in New York and many of my neighbors were Jamaican and Pakistani in both cities. The biggest difference was the look of the taxicabs.


ABQConvict
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Old 02-18-2010, 06:41 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,539 posts, read 10,837,154 times
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1. Canada (easily)
2. Australia
3. Great Britain
4.& 5. Ireland? New Zealand? South Africa (esp. urban areas)?
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Old 02-18-2010, 07:25 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 49,076,298 times
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The UK might be alot different to the US in many ways but compared to many other countries it's alot similar.

English ancestry is alot more prevalent/common in the US than those 'statistics' would have you believe. For example, alot of people (not talking about Native Americans) identify as 'American' and most of these people came from England, Scotland and Ireland.

Culturally the US is far more similar to Britain than Germany, but has a continental flavour Australia (unless you count the Italian/Greek influence) and New Zealand lack.
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Old 02-18-2010, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
2,161 posts, read 4,178,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The UK might be alot different to the US in many ways but compared to many other countries it's alot similar.

English ancestry is alot more prevalent/common in the US than those 'statistics' would have you believe. For example, alot of people (not talking about Native Americans) identify as 'American' and most of these people came from England, Scotland and Ireland.

Culturally the US is far more similar to Britain than Germany, but has a continental flavour Australia (unless you count the Italian/Greek influence) and New Zealand lack.
You see, that's the thing. It's so stereotypical to conclude that the U.S. is just British. There are so many more ethnicities present in everyday life(German, Italian, African, etc.) and those people are just as American(or U.S. American should I say). Especially emphasizing on those of African and Native American descent, thought there's not much of the latter left. I've known many whites who are of German descent associate with England like that too. It's so much into the U.S. culture to associate with them that even those of us that aren't much British still do it. It has to do with the language and history. In today's world things are different, and there were other European countries that influenced different parts of the U.S.

Last edited by Lovely95; 02-18-2010 at 07:53 PM..
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
8,083 posts, read 8,591,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
The Normans were French!

The Quebecois, and other French Canadians, have very, very little in common with France! Quebec could be Anytown, USA, except that the signs are in French. Quebecers eat burgers and french fries, drive SUVs, shop in malls, play football and hockey, dress in "American-style" clothes, live in sprawled-out suburbs, and spend their vacations in Maine, Michigan, and Florida.

The UK could easily pass for France, Sweden, Germany, or the Netherlands: it is thoroughly European in look and culture. The English drive little cars, live in dense cities, shop at boutiques, eat European-style food, play soccer and cricket, support socialism, and love European fashion.

Which one of these sound more "American?"

The British were not even the first Europeans to settle the United States, that honor belongs to the French and Dutch. I know the Brits founded the thirteen colonies, but that was more than 400 years ago. America also has many other significant cultural influences that the UK does not, including Native American, African, Dutch, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, and Mexican, just to name a few. Both countries have grown apart from each other over the past four centuries, and while your statement may have been true in 1700, it isn't in 2010.
Normandy may be in northwest France, but the Normans are NOT French. They are the decendents of the Vikings who settled in France. They certainly picked up parts of the French culture, but you cannot say they are French. You are right though about the influences of other cultures, we have changed alot since our colonial days. Im not saying we are identical to the brits, im just saying they are still the biggest contributor to our culture compared to others. I dont disagree with you at all when you cite the contributions of all those cultures you listed, that is what has made us the unique nation we are today.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:34 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,600,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Normandy may be in northwest France, but the Normans are NOT French. They are the decendents of the Vikings who settled in France. They certainly picked up parts of the French culture, but you cannot say they are French. You are right though about the influences of other cultures, we have changed alot since our colonial days. Im not saying we are identical to the brits, im just saying they are still the biggest contributor to our culture compared to others. I dont disagree with you at all when you cite the contributions of all those cultures you listed, that is what has made us the unique nation we are today.
The latinos are nipping at their heals, big time !
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Old 02-19-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,336 posts, read 30,586,760 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Normandy may be in northwest France, but the Normans are NOT French. They are the decendents of the Vikings who settled in France. They certainly picked up parts of the French culture, but you cannot say they are French.
This is not false, however by this measure only a small portion of present-day France can be said to be "French": Bretons in the northwest, Alsatians in the east, Basques in the southwest, Catalans in the south... to name a few. Only a small nucleus at the centre-north of the country might be said to be truly "French" under this definition.

Interesting also is that the French language became a totally dominant vernacular in New France (later Quebec) much sooner than it did in France itself. This is because the settlers from New France were from various regions of the old country, and all spoke their regional languages in addition to French (which they all had in common to some degree). So in French America, the regional languages that settlers brought with them from the old country died out and were replaced by French almost immediately.

In France, on the other hand, the regional languages subsisted in their local strongholds for much longer. Around 1800, perhaps only one quarter of France's population was French-speaking, in spite of an edict from the king more than 250 years earlier making French the country's only official language. (In New France/Quebec at the same time, everyone was by this point exclusively French-speaking and had been for generations.)

Though eroding, regional languages in France would survive reasonably well for another 100 years until the early part of the 20th century, when a precipitous decline began for most of them.
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