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Old 02-23-2010, 04:16 PM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,349 posts, read 20,049,117 times
Reputation: 36261

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Regarding the similarity of Germany to the U.S., a friend of mine, born and raised in the Southwestern U.S., spent a year in Prague, Czech Republic to study the Czech language. In that time he barely left the country except for weekend trips to points east and Vienna. After his year was up he spent a few weeks in Cologne, Hamburg and the Netherlands and said he felt like he was 'almost home' in terms of food, culture and overall vibe in those places compared to the comparatively 'foreign' Czech Republic.


ABQConvict
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:05 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,853 times
Reputation: 90
In no order

UK
Canada
France
Mexico
Ireland
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:04 PM
 
27 posts, read 44,945 times
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canada is like the us minus the crime and hate lol
mexico is like the us plus some crime
japans like us minus crime and plus tech, trains, brains, good flow, rich... nevermind japans not like us lol
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Old 02-24-2010, 01:31 PM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,349 posts, read 20,049,117 times
Reputation: 36261
Having been to Mexico and living in the U.S. state that is, perhaps, more like Mexico than any other (New Mexico), I fail to see how Mexico is more like the United States than many, many others.


ABQConvict
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Old 02-24-2010, 06:30 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 49,060,480 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I think there are significant cultural differences btw the US and Canada/ Australia/ New Zealand.
We were founded mainly by people interested in either making lots of money or seeking religious freedom. Like other colonial areas (Latin America and South Africa) we have a history where some people live in luxury while large numbers of others (esp racial minorities) live in abject poverty.

Australians call each other "mate" because they view their society as being one of equality. In American society people try to find their niche group and dislike other groups. There may be a sense of equality within the group but not outside it. I list the groups as being rich suburban Whites, poor rural Whites, poor inner city Blacks, middle class suburban Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians (<- often associate with upper class Whites). Generally rich and poor Whites immigrated for different reasons, the rich for money and the poor for religious freedom.

Americans (esp the Eastern half) are much more religious than Australians and Canadians. Attendance of religious service at least once a week: US 35%, Canada 17%, Australia 14%. In that regard we compare much closer to Latin America and Africa.
It's funny how inequality has defined the histories of those nations. Australia, of course, was first a series of penal colonies. Soon it became a wide brown land for land-hungry colonists who wanted to further enrich good old Mother England.

There is a sense of equality in Australia if you fit into the culture, though, and in that sense we're more inclusive than Americans. It think the similarities between us are more superficial; culturally, we're still a world apart, although the American media is influencing our young. Among 15 year olds 'dude' is more common than 'mate'!
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,477,187 times
Reputation: 2197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
This is not false, however by this measure only a small portion of present-day France can be said to be "French": Bretons in the northwest, Alsatians in the east, Basques in the southwest, Catalans in the south... to name a few. Only a small nucleus at the centre-north of the country might be said to be truly "French" under this definition.

Interesting also is that the French language became a totally dominant vernacular in New France (later Quebec) much sooner than it did in France itself. This is because the settlers from New France were from various regions of the old country, and all spoke their regional languages in addition to French (which they all had in common to some degree). So in French America, the regional languages that settlers brought with them from the old country died out and were replaced by French almost immediately.

In France, on the other hand, the regional languages subsisted in their local strongholds for much longer. Around 1800, perhaps only one quarter of France's population was French-speaking, in spite of an edict from the king more than 250 years earlier making French the country's only official language. (In New France/Quebec at the same time, everyone was by this point exclusively French-speaking and had been for generations.)

Though eroding, regional languages in France would survive reasonably well for another 100 years until the early part of the 20th century, when a precipitous decline began for most of them.
My degree in history says you know a lot about French history! Two thumbs up! The last figure I read was that at the time of Napoleon less than 20% of the "French" actually spoke French. My Great-grandmother was from Gascogne (Bordeaux) and spoke Occitan, not French.
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,477,187 times
Reputation: 2197
1. Canada - goes without saying. Places like Ottawa and Toronto just simply aren't the least bit foreign.

2. Australia - debate all you want, but Sydney is quite American, Melbourne less so...I mean, more than just a few Australian musicians go to the US and make country music!!!

Those are the only two that I've actually been two and can say they are "American" or there are places I go in these places that are strikingly "American" to me. I do think there are some similarities we have with Brazil. Adding any other countries to my list would be straining, or just running my mouth without experience there.

I definitely don't think Germany or France at all.
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:36 PM
 
30 posts, read 83,737 times
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I THINK WOULD BE:

CANADA
UNITED KINGDOM
AUSTRALIA

They are the most similar.... in their lifestyle....I don't believe Mexico is like USA there are so many things that are different culturally and economically.
that's my opinion friends
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:40 PM
 
30 posts, read 83,737 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
1. Canada - goes without saying. Places like Ottawa and Toronto just simply aren't the least bit foreign.

2. Australia - debate all you want, but Sydney is quite American, Melbourne less so...I mean, more than just a few Australian musicians go to the US and make country music!!!

Those are the only two that I've actually been two and can say they are "American" or there are places I go in these places that are strikingly "American" to me. I do think there are some similarities we have with Brazil. Adding any other countries to my list would be straining, or just running my mouth without experience there.

I definitely don't think Germany or France at all.
I'm totally agree with you bro..... but UK is similar too
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Old 02-26-2010, 06:05 AM
 
324 posts, read 607,726 times
Reputation: 273
In my opinion, the top five most similar cities to the United States are the following.....

1. Canada
2. United Kingdom
3. Ireland
4. Australia
5. New Zealand
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