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Old 08-03-2015, 02:41 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,717,991 times
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Originally Posted by bssh View Post
Definitely Australia...my visa came in a month and I am out of here with my toddler baby and husband for GOOD in Dec. I was BLOWN AWAY when I visited OZ last yr, they do things so much better than we do in most matters of life. I also got into a top PhD program with full pay. I cannot wait to leave this dumb anti science anti rationality country with its juvenile politics and endless wars and enemies.
You mean that you want to leave America behind? Aren't things improving now? Like better job market for example.
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Old 08-03-2015, 02:47 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,717,991 times
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Originally Posted by lookyhere View Post
Yeah...our corrupt government just wants the rich to pump money into the only vibrant sector of our economy; Condo construction and printing money to support the real estate market.

Canada is passe...get to Australia asap. That country is exposed to Asia far more than we are, and their weather is excellent too. When (not if) the USA crumbles, we'll be sideswiped by the fallout. I'm looking to bail from this frozen tundra as soon as my personal situation permits.
Huh? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Everything is so much cheaper there than in Australia, including rents and overall property prices!
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Old 08-03-2015, 03:29 AM
 
1,134 posts, read 842,338 times
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Originally Posted by OZpharmer View Post
Huh? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Everything is so much cheaper there than in Australia, including rents and overall property prices!
I think the perception that Australia is a high cost and high salary country came from the recent era when the $AUD traded at around $1.10USD. Those days are gone, and I doubt we'll see them again for a long, long time. The $AUD is now worth about $0.72USD.
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Old 08-03-2015, 06:28 AM
 
25,058 posts, read 24,915,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
I think the perception that Australia is a high cost and high salary country came from the recent era when the $AUD traded at around $1.10USD. Those days are gone, and I doubt we'll see them again for a long, long time. The $AUD is now worth about $0.72USD.
Why the big difference now? What changed?
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Old 08-03-2015, 03:01 PM
 
1,134 posts, read 842,338 times
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Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Why the big difference now? What changed?
When the US and EU were deep in recession the Australian economy was booming, even a little overheated. Now things are a lot more comparable between them.
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Old 08-06-2015, 11:29 AM
 
2,837 posts, read 2,559,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Why the big difference now? What changed?
Commodity demand collapse. Or more precisely, the slowdown of Chinese economy. Australia's GDP growth in the past decade almost correlates exactly with China's pace of growth and key commodity indices.

Of course, Australia's not the only one affected (Canada to a large extent too), but Australia is the single western economy that's become almost entirely reliant on Chinese demand. And that does not bode well as China is now likely heading into an era of slow to medium growth.
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Old 08-06-2015, 03:33 PM
 
1,134 posts, read 842,338 times
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Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Commodity demand collapse. Or more precisely, the slowdown of Chinese economy. Australia's GDP growth in the past decade almost correlates exactly with China's pace of growth and key commodity indices.

Of course, Australia's not the only one affected (Canada to a large extent too), but Australia is the single western economy that's become almost entirely reliant on Chinese demand. And that does not bode well as China is now likely heading into an era of slow to medium growth.
The US and EU recessions after the 2007-08 financial crisis also played a large role in shaping exchange rates, directly and then due to the flow on monetary policies of the Fed and ECB.

The surge in commodity prices in the mid to late 2000 were in a lot of ways a zero sum game for the Australian economy. Mining and resources boomed, but that had a commensurate negative impact on sectors like manufacturing, agriculture, tech and services.
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Old 08-07-2015, 04:41 AM
 
190 posts, read 211,733 times
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Panama, Costa Rica are often peaceful progressive countries with many Americans who have settled there, especially retirees enjoying their dollar retirement checks under the sun next to tropical beaches.
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Old 08-07-2015, 10:37 AM
 
2,837 posts, read 2,559,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
The US and EU recessions after the 2007-08 financial crisis also played a large role in shaping exchange rates, directly and then due to the flow on monetary policies of the Fed and ECB.

The surge in commodity prices in the mid to late 2000 were in a lot of ways a zero sum game for the Australian economy. Mining and resources boomed, but that had a commensurate negative impact on sectors like manufacturing, agriculture, tech and services.
Curious as to how the growth of mining affected the other sectors you mentioned? As in, shouldn't those sectors benefit from positive externalities of the mining boom (more jobs, more disposable income, higher consumer spending, etc.) rather than be negatively impacted?
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Old 08-07-2015, 10:56 AM
 
123 posts, read 110,999 times
Reputation: 251
-Australia
-Canada
-Texas
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