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Old 07-03-2007, 09:01 AM
 
346 posts, read 1,678,116 times
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I have not had any issues using my education in the US.

Use your own example about the Iranian lawyer. How would you translate his education and/or experience to the US system?

Certain professions require not only a degree but also certification. Foreign and US educated alike fall under these requirements. Every professional association will provide you with federal and state requirements for their specific field. There is even a site under "licensed occupations" which is rather informative.

Have you considered the language barrier? I am luck to be a translator/interpreter native level.
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Old 07-03-2007, 11:38 PM
 
245 posts, read 293,771 times
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Same here, we have some refugees taxidriver-doctors as some say are discriminated, when tested they often dont know much, so they will have to study some years and often prefer to drive a taxi instead.

Otherwise ie an Russian dentist have a good education, they just need language- and knowledge-tests to get a licence for free, seem to be so also in US but cost money.
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Old 07-06-2007, 03:42 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,746,897 times
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well- in S Florida I worked with an attorney who was from Nicaragua. When he came to the US the Florida bar didnt accept his law degree- and he had to start all over again. Other degrees probably vary in different areas.
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Old 07-17-2007, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Blackwater Park
1,715 posts, read 6,563,921 times
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My father-in-law received a medical degree from a reputable medical school in Nicaragua. He practiced in Costa Rica and Canada, but was required to pass additional medical board exams in the U.S. He claims they give more stringent exams to foreign doctors, but I don't know if this is true or if he is just bitter.
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Old 07-18-2007, 04:34 PM
 
2,575 posts, read 8,019,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyhelena View Post
well- in S Florida I worked with an attorney who was from Nicaragua. When he came to the US the Florida bar didnt accept his law degree- and he had to start all over again. Other degrees probably vary in different areas.
some states do not require a law degree to practice law; one must merely pass the bar examination. perhaps, he should have taken a bar-review course (elsewhere, if FL does not permit this), and then tried to pass the bar exam. assuming no language barrier, it's possible-- not likely, but possible.
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Old 07-18-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Ohio, but moving to El Paso, TX August/September
431 posts, read 1,575,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
I've spoken in the past on this board about my desire to obtain my PhD in another country in the coming years, most likely England for linguistic reasons (I'd consider other English-speaking nations and perhaps Spanish-speaking as well). However, I wonder whether or not such a thing would be worthless as it seems that the overwhelming majority of degrees from foreign univerisities simply aren't recognized here. I'm not sure if this hold as true for advanced degrees as it does for Bachelors or whether this differs wildly based on the subject of study, but we all know the traditional immigrant story of Nigerian engineers or Polish psychiatrists or Egyptian PhDs or trained medical professionals who then come to this country and are forced to work as taxi drivers or security guards because their degrees aren't recognized and might as well be non-existent, even if oftentimes from a good school. I know there are a handful of schools such as Oxford, and maybe Cambridge and McGill and the Sorbonne that are well-known and recognized in the U.S. but is it even worth earning a degree from other country if not attending the most elite of schools?
My husband has a Ph.D in finance and unless it's an elite school abroad for the Ph.D., you will pretty much never get hired in the US unless you have a ton of good publications. However, if you have low level or no pubs, you will have a very, very hard time getting a job in the US. Heck, if your from a low level school in the US you will have a hard time. And that's in a field that when my husband was originally on the market, there were two job openings for every candidate.

If you want to get into academics, the key to remember is out of grad school, you will not be hired at a school that is at the same level or better than your grad school. After awhile, reputation can get you past where you got your degree from, but you have to really be publishing a lot in quality "A" and "A-" journals.

That being said, my husband went through his masters in Holland, but that's because he's Dutch. When it came time for the Ph.D., he came to the US.
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Old 08-13-2007, 03:11 PM
 
575 posts, read 2,940,674 times
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What about a master's degree? I have a bachelors degree from a U.S. institution, but I'm planning on getting a master's degree in International business..from a university that ranks tops in this field world wide..from what I understood is that it'll be accepted most anywhere. I know some bachelor degrees that are only 3 years are not recognized in the U.S.
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:20 AM
 
6 posts, read 35,185 times
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Default Foreign degree

I am a holder of a foreign degree (MSEE) from Poland and I worked in a variety of engineering positions in New York metro area.

First I had my credentials evaluated by World Educational Services (World Education Services - International Education Intelligence). They confirmed that my diploma is an equivalent to MSEE being granted by US universities.

My credentials were accepted by employers with no problems. Once evaluated by WES they are also easily accepted by different city and state agencies.

I even think that in engineering fields foreign diploma can be an advantage compared to average US colleges.

After a few years on the job experience speaks louder than diplomas. I rarely even show my diploma to potential employers any more.
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Old 01-05-2008, 10:57 AM
 
253 posts, read 1,235,136 times
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What about a Bachelor or Arts from the University of Galway? (NUI-Galway). My D is American but attending college there. I know Galway is a prestigious university in IReland, but is it accepted here?
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Old 01-05-2008, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
3,589 posts, read 3,461,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post
I've spoken in the past on this board about my desire to obtain my PhD in another country in the coming years, most likely England for linguistic reasons (I'd consider other English-speaking nations and perhaps Spanish-speaking as well). However, I wonder whether or not such a thing would be worthless as it seems that the overwhelming majority of degrees from foreign univerisities simply aren't recognized here. I'm not sure if this hold as true for advanced degrees as it does for Bachelors or whether this differs wildly based on the subject of study, but we all know the traditional immigrant story of Nigerian engineers or Polish psychiatrists or Egyptian PhDs or trained medical professionals who then come to this country and are forced to work as taxi drivers or security guards because their degrees aren't recognized and might as well be non-existent, even if oftentimes from a good school. I know there are a handful of schools such as Oxford, and maybe Cambridge and McGill and the Sorbonne that are well-known and recognized in the U.S. but is it even worth earning a degree from other country if not attending the most elite of schools?
Unless you're going to Oxford or Cambridge in the UK, I wouldn't bother. Most Americans have never heard of any other university in the UK, and most of them don't stand up well when compared academically to top and even some second-tier universities here in the US.
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