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Old 10-09-2010, 10:57 AM
 
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What is the difference between the past tense of a word and the past participle?

Most of the time the past tense ends in "ed" and the past participle ends in "ed" or "ing".
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heeha View Post
What is the difference between the past tense of a word and the past participle?

Most of the time the past tense ends in "ed" and the past participle ends in "ed" or "ing".
The past tense (simple past) ends with ED when it's regular, has another form when it's irregular

Examples: I listened/ I talked (regular)
I came/ I saw/ I cut (irregular)

Past participle never ends with ING. But it will end with ED, EN or an irregular form.

Examples: I have been/ I have dreamed/ I have had
The book was written
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Old 10-10-2010, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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"I gave", simple past, stands alone and states only that it happened in the past. Utter simplicity, without any qualifications of meaning.

"Given" generally requires one of two things: Either an auxilary verb, or use in a non-action sense.

For example, "I have given", or "I had given", or "I was given" or "I might have given", each with an appropriate auxiliary. The simple past "gave" is never used after an auxiliary verb.

A non-verb sense could be something like "I'm leaving, given your bad mood." Or "I take that as a given". Or "The book, given me as a present , , ,"

Use of the participle is subject to much more complicated rules, but that's the general idea.
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:35 PM
 
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He had left the goner for dead.

Had he gone first, and left the dead sooner, he might have proven what in the end proved nonsensical.

He gone left the goner for dead.

Last edited by ergohead; 10-14-2010 at 12:37 AM..
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