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Old 10-26-2010, 11:02 AM
 
314 posts, read 976,061 times
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I need an example of sentences that use the same words in different orders to mean different things.
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Old 10-26-2010, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Whittier
3,005 posts, read 5,709,342 times
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Is this the Socratic method in action?


"Woman dances well, only for a little while."

"While for a little woman well, only dances."


I can do better. Let's just say I purposely did horrible so I wouldn't do your homework for you.
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Old 10-27-2010, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 80,534,556 times
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"Will you do it?"
"Do you will it?"

Sometimes you don't even have to change anything:

"Did you ever see a cake walk?" (or home run, or house fly, or egg roll.)
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Old 10-27-2010, 06:08 PM
 
Location: FROM Dixie, but IN SoCal
3,485 posts, read 6,060,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
"Will you do it?"
"Do you will it?"

Sometimes you don't even have to change anything:

"Did you ever see a cake walk?" (or home run, or house fly, or egg roll.)
Sometimes you only have to change the punctuation.

Woman, without her man, is helpless.

Woman! Without her, man is helpless!

As a long-lived and experienced male, I opt for the second sentence. (How else do you think I got to be long-lived enough to gain experience?)
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Old 10-29-2010, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Ogden, Utah
165 posts, read 373,090 times
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The example from Nighteyes is the one I was going to use. It comes from the thoroughly wonderful book "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves" which is itself an eponymic example.
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Old 10-30-2010, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 44,057,503 times
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oh...changing the order.

I would have suggested, "I got a run." Are you playing baseball, cribbage, wearing stockings...?
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:02 AM
 
Location: So Ca
22,391 posts, read 20,221,771 times
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Sign often seen in streets during construction or in neighborhoods with kids: "Slow children"

Slow, children.
Slow children!
Slow, children?
Slow children?
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Ogden, Utah
165 posts, read 373,090 times
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I've always wondered whether those "End Construction" road signs are an advisory -- or a protest.
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Old 11-06-2010, 03:54 PM
 
28,736 posts, read 43,772,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harhar View Post
Is this the Socratic method in action?


"Woman dances well, only for a little while."

"While for a little woman well, only dances."


I can do better. Let's just say I purposely did horrible so I wouldn't do your homework for you.
It doesn't matter. Someone always does it for them...
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Old 12-04-2010, 10:31 PM
 
Location: under a bridge
580 posts, read 2,193,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nighteyes View Post
Sometimes you only have to change the punctuation.

Woman, without her man, is helpless.

Woman! Without her, man is helpless!

As a long-lived and experienced male, I opt for the second sentence. (How else do you think I got to be long-lived enough to gain experience?)
Here is another one:

Bill helped his brother Jack, off the horse.

or without the comma:

Bill helped his brother Jack off the horse.

It makes a big difference. Doesn't it?
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