Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Writing
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-21-2018, 02:40 PM
 
859 posts, read 705,230 times
Reputation: 827

Advertisements

Hi all!
How do you do?
I'd like to ask about this rule. First, what I always use is " in order not to" Because, according to what I learned, in the negation, we should put "not" BEFORE "to". But I found that "In order to not" also used which makes me wonder whether or not this was a common error. Or both are correct.
1-If both are correct, what's the difference between them? and which one is the best in usage?

Ex:
-Sara pretends to be sick in order not to go to school.
OR
-Sara pretends to be sick in order to not go to school.

2-The same question about using the negation with "might be".
Ex:
-"He might not be alright"
OR
-"He might be not alright"

3- What's the difference between"May be" and "Maybe"?

Thanks in advance
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-21-2018, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
6,341 posts, read 4,896,476 times
Reputation: 17999
There are many sites on the internet that provide the origins of words and phrases.


Google is your friend.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 03:09 PM
 
859 posts, read 705,230 times
Reputation: 827
I already searched it. Most of times I find the other who wonder about the same question that I wondered about but not always you can get a certain answer. If you have a site that speaking about the same topics, put it and I appreciate it.

Thank you
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 04:33 PM
 
1,532 posts, read 1,060,396 times
Reputation: 5207
I looked on englishstackexchange:

The general feeling there, if I understand it correctly, seems to be that not to (verb) is used more frequently, either is acceptable, and to not (verb) emphasizes the negative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
29,214 posts, read 22,351,209 times
Reputation: 23853
Putting 'not' before the verb makes the negative negative. There isn't a negative tense in English.

"I do not go." as opposed to "I do go not."

Maybe is a different word than May be. Maybe is a synonym for 'possibly', 'perhaps', or other words that describe uncertainty.

"May be" can be used in its place, but it can also pertain to many other things.

"Maybe I'll go to the dance tonight."

"The orchestra may be short a member, so maybe I'll skip this dance."

"I heard the guitar player was sick. You may be correct. Maybe I'll go, or I may not."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
37,107 posts, read 41,238,832 times
Reputation: 45130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Authentic Bird View Post
Hi all!
How do you do?
I'd like to ask about this rule. First, what I always use is " in order not to" Because, according to what I learned, in the negation, we should put "not" BEFORE "to". But I found that "In order to not" also used which makes me wonder whether or not this was a common error. Or both are correct.
1-If both are correct, what's the difference between them? and which one is the best in usage?

Ex:
-Sara pretends to be sick in order not to go to school.
OR
-Sara pretends to be sick in order to not go to school.

2-The same question about using the negation with "might be".
Ex:
-"He might not be alright"
OR
-"He might be not alright"

3- What's the difference between"May be" and "Maybe"?

Thanks in advance
Most often you will want to keep to with the verb to which it is attached, but it is not a fixed rule. Sometimes it is a matter of how it sounds. As a native English speaker, in order not to go to school and might not be all right sound better to me.

Use all right; alright is nonstandard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2018, 02:14 PM
 
859 posts, read 705,230 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gusano View Post
I looked on englishstackexchange:

The general feeling there, if I understand it correctly, seems to be that not to (verb) is used more frequently, either is acceptable, and to not (verb) emphasizes the negative.
So, I understand from your comment that using "in order to not" is not considered error in English grammar but it's not a common use. So, " In order not to" is more acceptable in usage.
Thanks a lot Gusano for your clarification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2018, 02:36 PM
 
859 posts, read 705,230 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Putting 'not' before the verb makes the negative negative. There isn't a negative tense in English.

"I do not go." as opposed to "I do go not."

Maybe is a different word than May be. Maybe is a synonym for 'possibly', 'perhaps', or other words that describe uncertainty.

"May be" can be used in its place, but it can also pertain to many other things.

"Maybe I'll go to the dance tonight."

"The orchestra may be short a member, so maybe I'll skip this dance."

"I heard the guitar player was sick. You may be correct. Maybe I'll go, or I may not."

Well, I think I understood the difference now. But I still have a small question. Imagine that you heard someone uses "May be" and "Maybe" in his/her speaking and there is nothing written. You can't see anything written. And I told you to write his/her sentence down. According to what you heard, can you distinguish whether he meant "may be" or "maybe"?

let's take your example, if someone said : "I heard the guitar player was sick. You may be correct. Maybe I'll go, or I may not " then asked you to write it down.
Can you tell from his speaking that he means "May be in the second sentence and he means "Maybe" in the third sentence?

Thanks a lot banjomike for your clarification
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2018, 02:45 PM
 
859 posts, read 705,230 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Most often you will want to keep to with the verb to which it is attached, but it is not a fixed rule. Sometimes it is a matter of how it sounds. As a native English speaker, in order not to go to school and might not be all right sound better to me.

Use all right; alright is nonstandard.
Clear! You all right!
Thanks a lot suzy_q2010 for your clarification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2018, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
29,214 posts, read 22,351,209 times
Reputation: 23853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Authentic Bird View Post
Well, I think I understood the difference now. But I still have a small question. Imagine that you heard someone uses "May be" and "Maybe" in his/her speaking and there is nothing written. You can't see anything written. And I told you to write his/her sentence down. According to what you heard, can you distinguish whether he meant "may be" or "maybe"?

let's take your example, if someone said : "I heard the guitar player was sick. You may be correct. Maybe I'll go, or I may not " then asked you to write it down.
Can you tell from his speaking that he means "May be in the second sentence and he means "Maybe" in the third sentence?

Thanks a lot banjomike for your clarification
You're welcome, Bird.
In speech, 'may be' is thpically spoken as two distinct words with a pause between them. 'Maybe' is run into a single word when spoken.

It may be hard to distinguish one from the other sometimes. If I was asked to write it down and was unsure, I would use May Be as two words. This would be a better choice than Maybe, which is a more specific word.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Writing

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top