U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Writing
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-05-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
1,691 posts, read 3,726,653 times
Reputation: 4121

Advertisements

In today's Q o'day our wonderful fearless leader posed this question.

"What is your "favorite expression" used in your "neck of the woods" ? "

Ok this has gotten me and well AliceT had a wonderful answer that made me think I should pose this Question to the group.

What is the meaning behind the phrase "not worth two hoops and a holler" also known as "ain't worth two whoops and a holla" as well as several other manifestations.

Now this is a phrase that possiblely came out of the great depression, mom learned it from her parents and just grew up with the phrase never quite understanding the 'real' meaning. I have found out some info but want to know if someone has be detailed knowledge.

Also if anyone else has a ond phrase or saying that they would like know more about post it and we call all try to figure it out with you.


Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-05-2009, 01:43 PM
 
1,312 posts, read 4,620,680 times
Reputation: 1988
My grandpa always used the phrase "two whoops and a holler" to mean a short distance. Yelling distance I guess, since he always used it when referring to his SIL who lived 4 houses down.

Never heard him add the "ain't worth" part, so I'm no help there!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Orlando
8,176 posts, read 17,888,824 times
Reputation: 49856
I would take it as "nothing to get excited about"
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 03:33 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
556 posts, read 2,022,473 times
Reputation: 855
I found this on free dictionary.com

two (w)hoops and a holler Rur. a short distance. Lexington? That's just two whoops and a holler from here. We're just two hoops and a holler from the downtown.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 05:15 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
1,691 posts, read 3,726,653 times
Reputation: 4121
I found these at various locations

hoop chisler - a peddler of worthless rings and watches

hoop(s) a variation of hoopty an old raggled car

from online Etymology I found these:http://www.etymonline.com/index.php
holler 1699, Amer.Eng., var. of hollo (1542) "to shout," especially "to call to the hounds in hunting," related to hello. As a style of singing (originally Southern U.S.), first recorded 1936. hollow (adj.) O.E. holh (n.) "hollow place, hole," from P.Gmc. *holhwo-, related to hol "hole" (see hole). The noun sense of "lowland, valley, basin" is 1553. The verb is from M.E. holowen. The figurative sense of "insincere" is attested from 1529. To carry it hollow "take it completely" is first recorded 1668, of unknown origin or connection
hoop c.1175, from O.E. *hop, from P.Gmc. *khopa-, a Low Ger.-Frisian word (cf. O.Fris. hop, Du. hoep "hoop," O.N. hop "a small bay"). Hoop-petticoat is attested from 1711. hoopla 1877, hoop la, Amer.Eng., earlier houp-la, exclamation accompanying quick movement (1870), of unknown origin, perhaps borrowed from Fr. houp-là "upsy-daisy," also a cry to dogs, horses, etc.
whoop (v.) c.1376, houpen, partly imitative, partly from O.Fr. houper "to cry out," also imitative. It is attested as an interjection from at least 1460. The noun is recorded from 1600. Extended form whoopee is attested from 1845, originally Amer.Eng.; whoopee cushion is attested from 1960. Phrase whoop it up "create a disturbance" is recorded from 1884. Expression whoop-de-do is recorded from 1929. Whooping cough (1739) is now the prevalent spelling of hooping cough; whooping crane is recorded from 1791. whoops exclamation of dismay, 1925, variant of oops
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Way upstate NY - Where the snow flys
1,130 posts, read 1,486,973 times
Reputation: 1218
So could it mean that whatever the situation it's not worth yelling and screaming to a neighbor to get their attention.
My Amish neighbors, especially the children will practically carry on a conversation yelling to each other from field to field and I can hear them half a mile away.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 05:47 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
1,691 posts, read 3,726,653 times
Reputation: 4121
That is a neat idea, Gaffer. never thought of that one.

I will say that most often it was used as statement against something normally an object or getting something done. "that's just not worth two whoops and a holler" "all that trouble for something not worth....."
I will have to ask my aunt and cousins to see what they can recall about the phrase. the investigation is quite informative.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Way upstate NY - Where the snow flys
1,130 posts, read 1,486,973 times
Reputation: 1218
I'm also thinking hoop to be a variation of hoot and in rural lands derived from the hoot of an owl. Further 'just a hoot and a holler away' being the relatively short distance in rural terms one can be heard. Something less than a mile?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Way upstate NY - Where the snow flys
1,130 posts, read 1,486,973 times
Reputation: 1218
Insert Hoot and Holler into a search engine and you will find a hoot and holler a communication system, walkie talkies and the like.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2009, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Way upstate NY - Where the snow flys
1,130 posts, read 1,486,973 times
Reputation: 1218
A hoop and holla story: I was cutting logs with the Amish last winter when I heard the girls yelling from the house (we were on the outskirts of a far field). Andy, the 12 year old boy turned to me and said the girls want to know if we're ready to eat. I said sounds good. He yelled back in Dutch 'ya we're ready'. The girls yelled again. Andy said 'they're making toasted cheese, soup and home made ice cream want to know if that's ok' I said sure. Andy yelled back to the girls and half an hour later one of them came walking a cross the field with a box filled with our lunch.
Hooping and hollering at work and what a life style - great.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Writing
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top