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York and Lancaster Counties Rock Hill - Fort Mill - York - Tega Cay - Lancaster
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Old 10-29-2015, 06:28 AM
 
73 posts, read 85,727 times
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Good morning all. We are finally moving down from Ohio before Xmas. We are having a house built in Indian Land that will be done in Feb. it was a tough decision where to make our home( between Fort Mill and Indian Land). We have a third grader who was diagnosed with high functioning Autism this year. He has been pretty much mainstreamed in a catholic school system with 36 kids in a class all three grades. He is smart and only has sensory, coordination and social cues issues. We opted for a 504 plan this year because private catholic schools typically do not offer IEP plans. After researching Fort Mill I was finding lots of info that Fort Mill does not have the best resources for Special Ed. We have heard better scenarios with Indian Land. Are there any parents out there who could elaborate more on Indian Lands Special Ed programs? He is excited (right now) about the move but I know it will be tough on him moving mid year to a new school. Since being diagnosed, there has always been a parent home after school to help with his homework and stuff. That being said, once he is comfortable in his new environment we hope we can do without a IEP. Thanks in advance!!
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Old 11-07-2015, 04:54 PM
 
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Lol, I guess either we have nothing to worry about or a whole bunch.
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Old 02-03-2016, 01:50 AM
 
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My experience has been not good at Indian land special Ed. I am looking at pulling my kid out into a private school in the fall.
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Old 02-03-2016, 06:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddo10 View Post
My experience has been not good at Indian land special Ed. I am looking at pulling my kid out into a private school in the fall.
Can you private message me and elaborate a little more, and what private schools were you thinking. We are new and its hard to navigate the area and what private schools are close to Indian Land...
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Old 02-05-2016, 07:08 AM
 
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In terms of FM my neighbor who has a special needs son says she hasn't had any issues with the school and they've been very accommodating. I think that it depends on what the issue is. For children that only have mild issues and can be mainstreamed in the classroom it doesn't sound like a problem, the issue seems to be with kids that can't be mainstreamed or are borderline.

We've had some behavioral issues with our son and his school (in Fort Mill) has been super accommodating even though he hadn't received a diagnosis yet. We finally have an official diagnosis that we're bringing to the school to discuss a 504 plan, but at this point it would just be to formalize the plan that's already in place and get a plan in place for when they have to take standardized tests, which will be the area in school where he'll have issues for the rest of his academic years.
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Old 02-05-2016, 12:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCCoqui View Post
In terms of FM my neighbor who has a special needs son says she hasn't had any issues with the school and they've been very accommodating. I think that it depends on what the issue is. For children that only have mild issues and can be mainstreamed in the classroom it doesn't sound like a problem, the issue seems to be with kids that can't be mainstreamed or are borderline.

We've had some behavioral issues with our son and his school (in Fort Mill) has been super accommodating even though he hadn't received a diagnosis yet. We finally have an official diagnosis that we're bringing to the school to discuss a 504 plan, but at this point it would just be to formalize the plan that's already in place and get a plan in place for when they have to take standardized tests, which will be the area in school where he'll have issues for the rest of his academic years.
Thank you SCCOQUI....
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Old 02-10-2016, 07:24 PM
 
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about Fort Mill
http://nebula.wsimg.com/2442c87a9452...&alloworigin=1
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Old 02-11-2016, 05:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Beckye2 View Post
Thanks for the read Beckye2.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckye2 View Post

Thanks for this info.
I found from what I've heard the initial evaluation issue is not just a FMSD issue but a general issue across many school districts throughout. They fail to want to open up regarding paying for the evaluation and the onus ends up on the parents to pursue it. We knew that this would be a problem so instead of having years of back and forth with the school district we ended up paying for our son's evaluations out of pocket.

From the parents that I've spoken with, which we are all parents with kids in that same school that's listed in the complaint -- Sugar Creek Elementary -- none of us have had issues in working with the school and teachers in getting a plan in place for our kids.

My son has a very similar diagnosis as what the child in the complaint has, ADHD with Dysgraphia with mild anxiety and depression mixed in. He also has some issues that will require OT (inability to tie shoes and issues with fine motor skills are classic symptoms of dysgraphia).

The teachers have made accommodations for him, even before the complete diagnosis. The Psychiatrist and education specialist that evaluated our son said that for that diagnosis children do not qualify for an IEP since it's not considered a learning disability. Accommodations are made for using the computer to write things out, longer time allotment for test taking and my son was given a headset to block out noise and distractions when it's reading or writing time. The next step will be to put a formal 504 plan in place but they're already doing what he needs for him. Our focus will be getting it on the record for next school year.

I read the information in that complaint and I agree that the school dropped the ball in testing, but they were already giving the child accommodations even before the official diagnosis. As you know, testing is not cheap and this is why they push back.

I know it's hard as a parent to see our children struggle, but I wouldn't have waited so long for the school to get off it's haunches to do the evaluation. I asked the school psychiatrist for a list of doctors that they would recommend and asked local friends and family for places as well and settled on one that was highly recommended by everyone. The school never offered up that the district would pay for the evaluation since I'm sure they get many parents looking for the same thing.

I actually switched our insurance carrier when we had open enrollment at work so that we made sure that the health insurance we had would be accepted by the evaluation center. Child and Family Development in Pinevelle. They only take Aetna, which we didn't have.

Anyway, as to the OPs question. It sounds like they have a child with a formal diagnosis already and aren't looking for the school district to have them evaluated. Once you have a formal medical evaluation, from all the parents I've spoken to the school seems to be pretty open about setting up a plan for the child and granting needed accommodations.
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Old 02-11-2016, 06:28 PM
 
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actually that was the second complaint against FMSD this year to find child find violations and notes specifically issues at Sugar Creek with using response to intervention instead of a 504/IEP.

Under federal law schools are legally required to test when notified of a suspected disability under section 504. In the case sited the district was giving the child meds and legally was required to have a 504 on file. If they suspect the child might need an IEP they are to do testing according to federal law The Child Find Mandate: What Does It Mean to You? - Wrightslaw

Dysgraphia a specific learning disability and is recognized by the state of South Carolina. There was a specific letter sent by John Payne from the SCDE http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/File/n...S-Dyslexia.pdf and Micheal Yudin at the US Dept of Education http://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/gui...ia-10-2015.pdf addressing this to the schools plus I have a letter personally for the former head school psychologist stating dysgraphia is a specific learning disability that requires specific treatment.

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD and dysgraphia, you need accommodations then they can give you a 504 without doing a psych ed eval- feel free to look it up Protecting Students With Disabilities

ADHD qualifies for an IEP under OHI if a child needs specialized instruction or related services.

The statement you made " Accommodations are made for using the computer to write things out, longer time allotment for test taking and my son was given a headset to block out noise and distractions when it's reading or writing time. The next step will be to put a formal 504 plan in place but they're already doing what he needs for him. Our focus will be getting it on the record for next school year" is very troubling, since in both the Jan 8, 2016 and Feb 9, 2016 rulings similar things were said to the parents and the interventions were presented as "informal" or "pre" 504 plans. This is a blatant violation of OCR guidelines and SCDE regulations. THe SCDE addressed this practice as concerning in the letter of resolution sent on Jan 8, 2016 http://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/gui...-07rtimemo.pdf.

I think you might want to do some research- if your child has functional life skill issues such as "inability to tie shoes and issues with fine motor skills are classic symptoms of dysgraphia" which require an OT according to the federal register and IDEA, he qualifies for an IEP. From the SCDE ruling issues in Jan 2016:

Section 614(b)(2)(A) of IDEA and the final regulations at 34 C.F.R. § 300.304(b) state that in conducting an evaluation, the public agency must use a variety of assessment tools and strategies to gather relevant functional, developmental, and academic information. Therefore, the IDEA and the regulations clearly establish that the determination about whether a child is a child with a disability is not limited to information about the child's academic performance. 34 CFR § 300.lOl(c) states that each State must ensure that a FAPE is available to any individual child with a disability who needs special education and related services, even though the child has not failed or been retained in a course or grade, and is advancing from grade to grade



It is important to note that in determining whether a child has a disability -- whether an SLD or any of the other disability categories identified in 34 CFR §300.8 -- the IDEA requires the use of a variety of assessment tools and strategies to gather relevant functional, developmental, and academic information about the child, and prohibits the use of any single measure or assessment as the sole criterion for determining whether a child is a child with a disability and for determining an appropriate educational program for the child. 34 CFR §300.304(b)( l ) and (2). Therefore, it would
be inconsistent with the IDEA for a child, regardless of whether the child is gifted, to be found ineligible for special education and related services under the SLD category solely because the child scored above a particular cut score established by State policy.

The United States Department of Education, OSEP Policy Memo, December 20, 2013. Functional is a term that means "routine activities of everyday living." In other words, the education of students includes not only academics, but also instruction, if needed, in behavior, occupational therapy, or physical therapy, if the student needs this instruction to access the general education curriculum. Commentary in the Federal Register, page 46661.



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