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Old 04-19-2015, 11:40 AM
 
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Curious if people might have suggestions for an interesting, evergreen flowering, shrub that can form an informal hedge, say around 6' or so high.

My leading idea is Abelia Grandiflora -- but I already have two of these in another part of the yard and so for the sake of variety I might choose something else if I can think of it and if it is something available at my local nurseries. Sunset lists these as partial-evergreen, but they've been evergreen in my gardening zone.

Next on my list is wax leaf or Japanese privet, but again, I already have some of these, and I'm hoping for something with more flowers.

I also considered a few types of Viburninum, but I think these look too common and institutional (at least around Seattle).

Other ideas? So far, I'm leaning towards Abelia...

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Old 04-19-2015, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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I'm on the east coast, but I'll give it a try. In the PNW, it seems rhodies may do well. These are evergreen, and there are some cultivars that may be interesting. How about Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Oregon Blue? This may be native to your area, and it is both blue and kind of weepy. Apparently it responds well to trimming.
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Old 04-20-2015, 10:51 AM
 
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the DWARF forms of English laurel ("otto luyken" for example) are nice (good foliage and flowers) and don't require lots of trimming for a number of years. various forms and cultivars of pieris ("lily of the valley shrub", "shrub Andromeda") are wonderful all-season performers and generally grow fairly dense----many have brilliant red or maroon new foliage (like photinia) but don't grow as tall and as fast as photinia many evergreen azaleas are also reasonably dense and slow growing and have nice spring flowers.

if you're in the PNW (on the west side of the cascades) then the native garrya elleptica ("silk tassle") might be worth considering for a taller hedge and the native (and naturally fairly dense) evergreen huckleberry (vaccinium ovatum) might be worth looking at as smaller (3-4') hedge type plant. would also suggest various forms of camellia japonica as they are also generally dense plants that would make a good flowering screen.

hope this helps.
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Old 04-25-2015, 02:08 PM
 
195 posts, read 190,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I'm on the east coast, but I'll give it a try. In the PNW, it seems rhodies may do well. These are evergreen, and there are some cultivars that may be interesting. How about Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Oregon Blue? This may be native to your area, and it is both blue and kind of weepy. Apparently it responds well to trimming.
Thank you, but not a big fan of rhodies -- and I've never seen these used as a hedge, or only in something much less formal than I want.

Looking for something that has smaller and more delicate flowers, and that would take more to some hedge type trimming.

Last edited by GRF206; 04-25-2015 at 02:16 PM..
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Old 04-25-2015, 02:15 PM
 
195 posts, read 190,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
the DWARF forms of English laurel ("otto luyken" for example) are nice (good foliage and flowers) and don't require lots of trimming for a number of years. various forms and cultivars of pieris ("lily of the valley shrub", "shrub Andromeda") are wonderful all-season performers and generally grow fairly dense----many have brilliant red or maroon new foliage (like photinia) but don't grow as tall and as fast as photinia many evergreen azaleas are also reasonably dense and slow growing and have nice spring flowers.

if you're in the PNW (on the west side of the cascades) then the native garrya elleptica ("silk tassle") might be worth considering for a taller hedge and the native (and naturally fairly dense) evergreen huckleberry (vaccinium ovatum) might be worth looking at as smaller (3-4') hedge type plant. would also suggest various forms of camellia japonica as they are also generally dense plants that would make a good flowering screen.

hope this helps.
I suppose I should not have said "informal" hedge. The more I think about it, I'd like the option of making it fairly formal.

Some variety of laurel might work -- the Portugal Laurel is my favorite in this family.

After reading about it just now though, I was reminded that it is a relative of the cherry.

This spot had a cherry tree 15-20 years ago, that was very sick. My former mother in law, who was a garden store owner, suggested that it had a disease that was common to cherry trees and related plants, and that the disease might be in the soil. I removed that tree 15 years ago, though some of the roots are probably still deep in the soil. I wonder, if that disease, could still be in the soil 15 years later?
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Old 04-25-2015, 09:10 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Red tipped photinia? Grows fast, it has bright red young leaves in Spring, and beautiful white, fragrant flowers that attract butterflies.
Red tipped photinia - Google Search
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Old 04-25-2015, 09:18 PM
 
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deciduous cherries (in the PNW) often get a variety of diseases on foliage and stems---the evergreen cherries (aka "cherry laurels") don't seem to be so susceptible and therefore might be just fine. again, I would suggest the "dwarf" forms of English laurel like "otto luyken" which are naturally more compact and finer textured than the typical form and look more like the Portugal laurel. I would also still suggest you look at the taller pieris varieties that are fine textured, many have excellent colored (red/maroon) new foliage and would likely make a good medium (6' or so) hedge (I have one that's at least 8' tall and wide). another flowering evergreen with good hedge potential is escallonia rubra and cultivars.
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Old 04-27-2015, 10:10 PM
 
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Juniper? They come in a variety of sizes for shade or sun.
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Old 04-28-2015, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,065,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FW transplant View Post
Juniper? They come in a variety of sizes for shade or sun.
Junipers for the shade? I've never heard that
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Old 04-29-2015, 01:20 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,656 posts, read 8,096,443 times
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Laurel or cypress? Could use Yew as well, though it's highly poisonous.
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