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Old 05-02-2015, 10:46 AM
 
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So is there a location in Florida that can possibly grow both Citrus Fruit and Stone Fruit? I know there are modified stone fruit that require 200-300 hours of chilling - don't know much about them or their quality.

Thanks
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Old 05-02-2015, 10:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazal View Post
So is there a location in Florida that can possibly grow both Citrus Fruit and Stone Fruit? I know there are modified stone fruit that require 200-300 hours of chilling - don't know much about them or their quality.

Thanks
Florida and stone fruit Cir1159/MG374: Florida Peach and Nectarine Varieties

Of note, I couldn't grow anything in FL because of the constant battle with nematodes.

Citrus is getting more difficult to grow in FL because of citrus canker.
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Old 05-03-2015, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
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I live in Maryland and know nothing about citrus. But I can share what I have learned regarding growing peach, apple and pear trees.

First step is to shape the trees. If you drive by an orchard you will notice they all are shaped with an open center and wide branches that grow out, not up. There's a reason, you need the center open for air flow. Too accomplish this you need to put small weights on the branches of your young tree to make them parrell to the ground so they grow out and not up. I experimented with several ways to do this. If the tree is very young a clothes pin will be enough weight, just move it out as far as you need to get to parallel. If the branches are larger I was tying them with twine to a brick on the ground But this became a nightmare when mowing. So this year I found my solution. I took freezer zip lock bags and filled them with gravel. Then I took a piece of wire and punctured the bad above the zip lock and then use it to hang on the branches. I sure wish I had though to this sooner, with gravel it's easy to add or subtract weight.

As for spraying I learned that "half pedal fall" is the time when the fruit is most vulnerable to bugs. So after the bloom, and when half of the pedals are on the ground, you need to spray Any sooner and you will prevent the bees from doing their majic, too late and the fruit will grow to about golf ball sized but soon die and fall as they are filled with bugs that you can not see but they are there. So spray at half pedal fall, then every 2-3 weeks throughout the summer.
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Old 05-03-2015, 11:15 AM
 
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We live in South Central TX (northwest of San Antonio) and currently grow pomegranates, peaches, apricots, blackberries and plums. Winters here get pretty cold, snow is rare but freezes are common, so tropical plants don't fare too well. We do have a Meyer Lemon tree, but it's potted and lives indoors in winter. Summers are very hot and, during drought years, take lots of supplemental watering. South Texas is more conducive to citrus and tropical plants, but not peaches or apricots or plums because of the required chilling hours. And though we probably have enough chilling hours, it's too hot for cherries in the summer.
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Old 05-04-2015, 12:39 PM
 
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Yeah, it would be tough to grow such a wide variety of fruits in the same area. Apples and pineapples won't like the same climat.

We're in apple country here in Mass, there are 39 trees in our yard, and two peach trees. Grapes grow wild, as do blackberries. That's enough fruit for me and only the trees entail any work on my part, but not too much because they like it here, this used to be part of a much larger orchard.
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Old 05-06-2015, 07:49 AM
 
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North Carolina is great for growing fruits (and has ample cheap land and it rains enough your rarely water) but you may have to change your list a bit. Some of the best fruit trees to grow around here are figs, pomegranates, plums, pawpaws, persimmons, mulberries and peaches. There are also tons of non-tree fruits that do great here; blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, melons, blackberries, grapes, kiwi and many others.

Charlotte and Raleigh are also good places to find professional employment.
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Old 05-16-2015, 02:34 AM
 
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I live in north Texas (Dallas). Blackberries, plums, and strawberries will grow here. Ju-Jubes. Maybe watermelon. But not much else fruit-wise, unless you have a greenhouse. Too extreme a climate (too cold, then too dry and hot). And the soil isnt good. Think hot things, like peppers and tomatoes, and vegetables.

South Texas (Houston) would work for figs, citrus, blackberries, and a lot of other fruits.

Southern Louisiana is ideal for fruits (except for apples and the ones other posters have mentioned that need northeastern type weather). It's a subtropical climate with good, rich soil.
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