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Harrisburg area Cumberland, Dauphin, and Perry Counties
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Old 01-26-2015, 02:41 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 10,384,804 times
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Fedgov presence in the area is related not only to state capital status but also to logistics. http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnr...anicsburg.html is in the metro and DLA Distribution Susquehanna is literally immediately adjacent in the northern tip of York County (an important detail to a Fed, as that means it is in the Washington DC pay locality not the "rest of US" Locality Pay Area Definitions ) Carlisle Barracks Command is icing on the cake, with key tenant US Army War College
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Old 01-26-2015, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Kittanning
4,656 posts, read 7,948,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaq View Post
Many cities in PA, such as Philly, Pit, Allentown, Bethlehem are going through downtown revilalizations. a lot of new upscale apartments being build downtown, etc. why isn't the same thing happening in harrisburg?
Harrisburg has a very busy and active downtown, or at least it seemed so the few times I visited. There are also some hip urban neighborhoods surrounding downtown Harrisburg.

I wouldn't put Allentown on your list as an example of urban revitalization, and I would certainly rank Allentown below Harrisburg in terms of vibrant downtowns. Harrisburg has one of the most vibrant downtowns in the state, among cities smaller than Philly and Pgh. Downtown Allentown is dead, and their idea of progress is demolishing blocks of historic urban architecture for some ugly modern buildings.
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Old 01-27-2015, 05:52 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,496 posts, read 19,376,482 times
Reputation: 15444
Quote:
Originally Posted by blauskies View Post
Backwards and behind the times, just look at the current PA license plates, terrible design and color and we all thought "You've Got a Friend in Pennsylvania" themed license plates was the end of it. All coming out of Harrisburg.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with Pennsylvania's current license plates. It has a distinctive color scheme, and it's easily readable from a distance. When you see it on a car, you know exactly where it's from, which is the point of a license plate.

The worst license plate designs are the busy ones that use graphics for the sake of using graphics. Texas ended up changing to a plain white license plate with black lettering after the police in Texas realized that they were difficult to read with all mountain ridges and fluffy white clouds plastered all over them. Ohio recently changed their license plates because the design-by-committee approach of their previous ones made them look hideous.

Pennsylvania, New York, Illinois and California do it right: They have simple designs with distinctive color schemes, and they're easy to read. It's a license plate, not a ****ing billboard or travel brochure. By the way, here's what my license plate looks like:



Ah, look at the peaches, the pretty tree and the rolling meadows. Too bad nobody can tell what the hell they are from more than six feet away, or even read "Peach State" from that distance, for that matter.

By the way, what the hell does a license plate design have to do with the lack of revitalization in the city of Harrisburg?
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:46 PM
 
1,271 posts, read 2,290,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
There's absolutely nothing wrong with Pennsylvania's current license plates. It has a distinctive color scheme, and it's easily readable from a distance. When you see it on a car, you know exactly where it's from, which is the point of a license plate.

The worst license plate designs are the busy ones that use graphics for the sake of using graphics. Texas ended up changing to a plain white license plate with black lettering after the police in Texas realized that they were difficult to read with all mountain ridges and fluffy white clouds plastered all over them. Ohio recently changed their license plates because the design-by-committee approach of their previous ones made them look hideous.

Pennsylvania, New York, Illinois and California do it right: They have simple designs with distinctive color schemes, and they're easy to read. It's a license plate, not a ****ing billboard or travel brochure. By the way, here's what my license plate looks like:



Ah, look at the peaches, the pretty tree and the rolling meadows. Too bad nobody can tell what the hell they are from more than six feet away, or even read "Peach State" from that distance, for that matter.

By the way, what the hell does a license plate design have to do with the lack of revitalization in the city of Harrisburg?
PA's current plate is ugly and bland with Penn Dot colors that do not go along with much of anything, along with the previous version which was even worse. Not just PA but other states need to remove the URL like it's that hard to find? visitPA.com, like if that's not advertising?

Since all decisions come out of Harrisburg, the license plates as well it's all relevant to the backwards and behind the times thinking that exists there.

To make matter's worse, all special fund plates are now adorned with the same ugly color scheme. The new Gettysburg plate is tacky, when they could have done it better as a stand alone special interest plate.



The only one they have not touched yet is the Railroad plate, which I am guessing will soon be changed as well.

Other states have no problems with visibility, though I find many to be overly tacky as well some are done right.

Georgia has changed their plates like 3 times in the past 10 years, still cannot get it right either, they should have just well enough alone with Georgia on my mind
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Old 01-27-2015, 02:08 PM
 
Location: West York
121 posts, read 212,289 times
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IDK, I think the blue, white, and yellow scheme is distinctly PA. When I see a vehicle with those colors I know its from PA immediately. I have no problems with it.
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Old 01-27-2015, 03:00 PM
 
1,271 posts, read 2,290,496 times
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Well there is more to it, the color scheme and design and actually a historical Chilean flag

Historical Flags of Chile

Or a classy 70's Sport style sweatband:

Navy Blue White Yellow Striped Sports Headband Navy Blue White Yellow Striped Sports Headband : , Quality Sport Headbands made with terry cloth. Colorful headband & striped headband

Not sure what they were thinking, Penn Dot colors I heard but the latest website image shows Green and Blue with a little Yellow.

I have relatives that work for the state in Harrisburg, the stories I heard on how things are run makes things in the dysfunctional corporate world I'm use to seem like nothing.
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:58 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 10,384,804 times
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It's better than the pale yellow "puke tag" from NJ. And, Harrisburg is worlds better than Trenton too.
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Old 01-29-2015, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,521 posts, read 8,488,036 times
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A decent chunk of Harrisburg's revitalization, at least in terms of new restaurants and other attractions, occurred in the last decade, before it occurred in many other similar-sized cities in the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic region.

For whatever it is worth, if I ever lived in the Harrisburg area again (lived in the area from June 2000 to March 2008), I'd probably choose to live in midtown Harrisburg, not far from Forster Street (either side) around 2nd or 3rd Streets.
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:39 AM
 
3,050 posts, read 2,856,252 times
Reputation: 3959
Therr are signs of Harrisburg revitalizing, slowly but surely. Something to remember is that the cities mentioned in the OP only began revitalizing in the last 15 years or so. It takes a little while for that sort of trend to reach less populated and more conservative areas.
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Old 02-24-2015, 09:22 PM
 
28 posts, read 32,251 times
Reputation: 57
You think Harrisburg is bad? Spend 5 minutes in "downtown" Lebanon. It makes Harrisburg look like freaking Times Square.
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