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Old 12-27-2007, 02:10 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
711 posts, read 1,692,441 times
Reputation: 350

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Just along the beach areas or many miles inland, too?
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Old 12-27-2007, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,727,471 times
Reputation: 2995
Check the following site: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/oh/hurricane..._flooding.html
http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/en_cfhtr.shtm (broken link)
http://www.wicomicocounty.org/e911/Mitigation%20Plan/Wicomico%20Hurricanes.doc (broken link)
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Old 12-27-2007, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
711 posts, read 1,692,441 times
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Thanks for the info!
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Old 12-31-2007, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Florida
278 posts, read 850,818 times
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I have seen my share of flooding in the inland areas through my years of growing up in Florida. It really depends on where a hurricane hits and what amount of storm surge you get along any of the multiple rivers or water inlets. I think all of Florida is considered a 'flood-plain' area...although there are areas it is less likely to occur.
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Old 01-06-2008, 10:00 AM
 
27 posts, read 102,881 times
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Well, the links above are probably your best bet, but just generally - the higher you are above sea level, the better. Florida is pretty flat, but some areas are still higher than others. We live about 10 minutes from the water but on a "hill" (it doesn't look like a hill here, just flat, but the land gently slopes up from the beach). We've never had (and never will, barring a massive tsunami) a problem with flooding.

Losing your roof is another story.
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Old 01-14-2008, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
10 posts, read 39,959 times
Reputation: 11
Does it flood in orlando, too? Any specific areas in Orlando I should avoid?
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Old 01-17-2008, 04:20 PM
 
7 posts, read 21,361 times
Reputation: 14
Default Hurricanes are filled with rain

Hurricanes generate a lot of rain. It will flood anywhere there is not good run off - in lakes, rivers and canals. AND heavy rains in ANY state would have the same problem if several inches of rain dropped in a short amount of time.
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Old 01-20-2008, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Florida/winter & Maine/Summer
1,174 posts, read 2,250,114 times
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The best insurance package in Florida includes Federal Flood Insurance. I live on an island, and even though I am not in the flood plain area, if a storm hits at the right time with a high tide, and a full moon, I would not want to take any chances. The coverage is very reasonable! We have not received the amount of rain that is normally generated from hurricanes in recent years. If 14 inches of rain fell, all bets are off.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
36 posts, read 134,028 times
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Default Flooding has various of forms

Flooding has various of forms, but in most cases in florida the water has to make it to the ocean or to another main water basin (Lake Okeechobee, Everglades, etc). So the property miles away may have more flooding problems because the water has to sit and slowly drain out of the area to the final destination. Look at Sunrico's links to fema to view the maps.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,739 posts, read 32,771,819 times
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I remember during hurricane Francis, there was so much rain in such a short period of time the ground was soaked. Deltona near me flooded.

You have to ask around if your moving here, if your buying make sure your not buying something in a flood zone and personally I would ask specifically how this property fared during the 2004 hurricane season, was there any flooding etc.
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