U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-03-2021, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
8,827 posts, read 5,534,736 times
Reputation: 23454

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fountainrunner View Post
I never said I didn't want to ask family and friends. I already tried that.
Fair enough.

Do you have a local active neighborhood group on facebook? That's a good place to get a lot of recommendations around here.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-03-2021, 04:11 PM
 
Location: NYC
19,138 posts, read 12,234,739 times
Reputation: 23362
It's possible that Gen Z will get into these fields because a lot of Gen Z don't like to sit in school and get bored easily. So they may end up not pursuing a college degree and get into skilled labor. I see a lot of 20+ working at construction sites of high rise buildings where they pay anywhere from $40+/hr just to stand around and be available hands.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2021, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
68,247 posts, read 63,575,801 times
Reputation: 83986
I've used the big handyman franchise that I won't mention because I don't want it to look like advertising, but you can figure out the name of whom I'm talking about. I'm sure they must vary depending upon the owner and the workers, but the one in my area has worked out very well for me. I've had jobs done like new closet doors and drapery rods hung, light fixtures added or changed out, bathroom refresh, a dishwasher put in. The latter was done last summer. He showed up masked, we stayed away from each other, and he got the job done. Had to move a cabinet, too.

They were busy, but they got there within two weeks. I also like that it's time and material, I send them photos, they give me an estimate and every single time the final cost came in under the estimate they gave me via email.

Then I bought a new TV that I wanted wall-mounted, but that was not worth paying the higher first-hour charge that the franchise charges. My next-door neighbor works for the town public works, so I asked him, and he said, "Yeah, call Buddy who is the maintenance man at the apartment complex on a nearby road. He does stuff like that on the side." Well, Buddy was there the next day, my TV was up, and I've got Buddy's number for next time.

One of my brothers also does handyman type work as well as painting, and he worked right through the COVID shutdown. Nobody wanted him in their house for a while, but he was busy all summer and fall with exterior repairs and painting.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: //www.city-data.com/terms.html
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2021, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Austin
14,352 posts, read 8,338,001 times
Reputation: 16516
I've dealt with dozens of contractors over the years. it is a full time job for a homeowner to remodel. the homeowner has to make sure they are doing what s/he wants, even if a general contractor is involved.....even if an architect is involved. the homeowner needs to supervise every aspect of every job every day.

Last edited by texan2yankee; 03-03-2021 at 07:43 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2021, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Palm Harbor, FL
2,003 posts, read 907,634 times
Reputation: 4421
Due diligence is in order. No, I've never found anyone through CList, but have by going to the state's licensing board to find people qualified to do the work. Amazing that I often found "pros" with apprentice/journeymen licenses according to the state board site (some long expired), but they readily passed out cards saying they were general contractors. Nope, they weren't. CHECK their license/s.

It doesn't matter which site you use to find your pro. Make sure you cross reference them with the state board site... cuz all practitioners need to be licensed by their state for their speciality.

Good luck.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2021, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,240 posts, read 4,467,260 times
Reputation: 4275
Default Home buying? Use the Realtor

Use the two realtors and see who they source for no BS repairs. It's in their interest to close fast, and tolerating drug induced, scammy, money and run contractors isn't exactly in their interest. We sourced two years ago local contractors through the town hall, by-law, and the lawyer and realtor representing our sale.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2021, 06:31 AM
Status: "WE Can Do Better!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cary, NC
37,288 posts, read 64,721,023 times
Reputation: 37457
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Typical.Girl View Post
Due diligence is in order. No, I've never found anyone through CList, but have by going to the state's licensing board to find people qualified to do the work. Amazing that I often found "pros" with apprentice/journeymen licenses according to the state board site (some long expired), but they readily passed out cards saying they were general contractors. Nope, they weren't. CHECK their license/s.

It doesn't matter which site you use to find your pro. Make sure you cross reference them with the state board site... cuz all practitioners need to be licensed by their state for their speciality.

Good luck.
Actually, this varies widely depending on state and municipality.

I can be a GC tomorrow in NC without any license at all.
As long as the project is less than $30,000.

I can subcontract to licensees in Electrical, HVAC, and Plumbing. No problem.
Carpenters, siding, windows, flooring, painting, sheetrock, roofing, trim, landscaping, masonry? No licensing needed, as long as they stay below $30,000.

I don't know about other states, but that is all true in NC.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2021, 08:56 AM
 
874 posts, read 534,660 times
Reputation: 1154
I'd say it depends on where you are - locations where union thugs run the show and artificially limit the supply of construction labor will have that problem, locations where they're kept in check should not.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2021, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Palm Harbor, FL
2,003 posts, read 907,634 times
Reputation: 4421
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Actually, this varies widely depending on state and municipality.

I can be a GC tomorrow in NC without any license at all.
As long as the project is less than $30,000.

I can subcontract to licensees in Electrical, HVAC, and Plumbing. No problem.
Carpenters, siding, windows, flooring, painting, sheetrock, roofing, trim, landscaping, masonry? No licensing needed, as long as they stay below $30,000.

I don't know about other states, but that is all true in NC.
Good info, thx & wow, that's amazing. I'm surprised to hear this in NC... doesn't that state require leasing agents or property managers to be realtors first? I don't see why that's necessary if doing walk-throughs with potential tenants & making sure dates match on a lease. Seems like overkill.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2021, 01:23 PM
Status: "WE Can Do Better!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cary, NC
37,288 posts, read 64,721,023 times
Reputation: 37457
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Typical.Girl View Post
Good info, thx & wow, that's amazing. I'm surprised to hear this in NC... doesn't that state require leasing agents or property managers to be realtors first? I don't see why that's necessary if doing walk-throughs with potential tenants & making sure dates match on a lease. Seems like overkill.
Yes, property managers have to be licensed to represent clients.

Leasing agents, such as for apartment communities? No. Not if they are employees of a property owner. They can work as unlicensed sales reps.
Now, if I decide to use a property manager to handle renting an investment property, they must hold a current license.

Actually, sales agents for builders aren't required to be licensed, but most builders require them to hold licenses so they have some ethical and legal training.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top