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Old 03-07-2012, 11:10 AM
 
665 posts, read 1,210,565 times
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nvia Systems, a battery startup backed by GM’s venture unit and other investors, says it’s made a breakthrough in lithium-ion technology that could dramatically cut the price of a 300-mile range electric vehicle.

Envia’s next-generation rechargeable battery has achieved the highest record energy density of 400 watt-hour/kilogram for a rechargeable lithium-ion cell. The industry standard for EV batteries is around 125 watt-hours/kilogram and costs upwards of $250 to $350 per kilowatt-hour to operate, Envia CEO Atul Kapadia told me in an interview. Envia has developed a battery that can deliver 2.5 times more energy than what’s currently in electric vehicles at a projected cost of $150 per kWh, Kapadia said.

The Electrochemical Power Systems Department at the Naval Surface Warefare Center tested the next-gen battery under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy – the same government agency that has provided $4 million in seed money to Envia.

California-based Envia was able to increase the energy density and slash the battery cost by tackling the components of a lithium-ion battery. A battery contains an anode on one side and a cathode on the other. An electrolyte, essentially the courier that moves ions between the electrodes when charging and discharging, sits in the middle.

Envia developed a low-cost cathode material using inexpensive materials including manganese. It also designed a silicon-carbon anode and a high-voltage electrolyte, Kapadia said. All of these innovations resulted in a 50 percent reduction in the cost of battery packs used in 300-mile range electric vehicles. The upshot? An electric vehicle for around $30,000 — a price that’s more closely in line with gasoline-powered cars and within reach of the average consumer.

Envia isn’t relying on economies of scale to reduce its manufacturing costs, Kapadia said. The $150 per kWh is achievable today, not once it becomes a large-scale manufacturer, he said. Instead, the company delivers its technology via partnerships with automakers. Kapadia wouldn’t give names, but he did say the company’s customers include automakers in Japan, Korea and the United States.

The components of the battery cell are being evaluated by various automakers — a process that can take several years. Kapadia says he expects the components of the battery to be commercialized in a couple of years.

Photo: Envia Systems


and
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
13,144 posts, read 21,664,490 times
Reputation: 14085
All we need now are instant charge batteries Quick Charge Battery Developments and we'll have something that can realistically replace the internal combustion engine.

It won't be long...
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:25 AM
 
28,785 posts, read 45,124,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptug101 View Post
nvia Systems, a battery startup backed by GM’s venture unit and other investors, says it’s made a breakthrough in lithium-ion technology that could dramatically cut the price of a 300-mile range electric vehicle.

Envia’s next-generation rechargeable battery has achieved the highest record energy density of 400 watt-hour/kilogram for a rechargeable lithium-ion cell. The industry standard for EV batteries is around 125 watt-hours/kilogram and costs upwards of $250 to $350 per kilowatt-hour to operate, Envia CEO Atul Kapadia told me in an interview. Envia has developed a battery that can deliver 2.5 times more energy than what’s currently in electric vehicles at a projected cost of $150 per kWh, Kapadia said.

The Electrochemical Power Systems Department at the Naval Surface Warefare Center tested the next-gen battery under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy – the same government agency that has provided $4 million in seed money to Envia.

California-based Envia was able to increase the energy density and slash the battery cost by tackling the components of a lithium-ion battery. A battery contains an anode on one side and a cathode on the other. An electrolyte, essentially the courier that moves ions between the electrodes when charging and discharging, sits in the middle.

Envia developed a low-cost cathode material using inexpensive materials including manganese. It also designed a silicon-carbon anode and a high-voltage electrolyte, Kapadia said. All of these innovations resulted in a 50 percent reduction in the cost of battery packs used in 300-mile range electric vehicles. The upshot? An electric vehicle for around $30,000 — a price that’s more closely in line with gasoline-powered cars and within reach of the average consumer.

Envia isn’t relying on economies of scale to reduce its manufacturing costs, Kapadia said. The $150 per kWh is achievable today, not once it becomes a large-scale manufacturer, he said. Instead, the company delivers its technology via partnerships with automakers. Kapadia wouldn’t give names, but he did say the company’s customers include automakers in Japan, Korea and the United States.

The components of the battery cell are being evaluated by various automakers — a process that can take several years. Kapadia says he expects the components of the battery to be commercialized in a couple of years.

Photo: Envia Systems


and
Where's the link? If I understand it correctly you are violating forums rules by not including the link to the quoted text...

And for anyone doing a Google search it's Envia Systems. The OP didn't even copy the article correctly.

I found where it may have originated: http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/inte...-by-half/13541
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Old 03-10-2012, 07:03 PM
 
12,918 posts, read 17,701,052 times
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The problem with quick charge is it requires tremendous amounts of power. There are charging stations that will do it in 30 minutes but that requires 480 V power, which none of us have in our homes. Do the math: If it takes a household charger 12 hours at 2 kw, to do that in 1/12 hour (5 minutes) would require 288 kw. For those five minutes, charging a vehicle will take as much power as 56 homes. Sure, it could be done, but enhanced electric service to the charging station would be required.
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Old 03-12-2012, 02:24 PM
 
3,244 posts, read 7,129,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
All we need now are instant charge batteries Quick Charge Battery Developments and we'll have something that can realistically replace the internal combustion engine.

It won't be long...
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Actually, what we need is a clean source to generate all the power to charge these batteries. Where do you think the power comes from?
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Old 03-12-2012, 08:46 PM
 
1,743 posts, read 2,076,743 times
Reputation: 953
Perhaps battery swapping stations are the answer. Would look sort of like those drive-in car washes. You pull in, the machine accesses a standardized hatch in your vehicle, removes the (almost) discharged battery and inserts a fully charged one. All for a small fee of course.

The used battery would be conveyed to a charging unit and then put back in inventory for the next customer.
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:02 PM
 
28,785 posts, read 45,124,290 times
Reputation: 37842
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuixoticHobbit View Post
Perhaps battery swapping stations are the answer. Would look sort of like those drive-in car washes. You pull in, the machine accesses a standardized hatch in your vehicle, removes the (almost) discharged battery and inserts a fully charged one. All for a small fee of course.

The used battery would be conveyed to a charging unit and then put back in inventory for the next customer.
Only with a guaranteed tow/on the road replacement at no cost if I get the one that's on it's last legs.
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:10 PM
 
1,743 posts, read 2,076,743 times
Reputation: 953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Only with a guaranteed tow/on the road replacement at no cost if I get the one that's on it's last legs.
Sure thing. But to prevent that situation batteries would be tested before/during recharging and returned for refurbishing/recycling if in poor condition
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Old 03-14-2012, 06:38 AM
 
28,785 posts, read 45,124,290 times
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Full-sized slot cars. No need for a battery on the interstate, just drop your leads and go. Be sure to wear your insulated boots if you have to get out of the vehicle.
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Old 03-16-2012, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
13,144 posts, read 21,664,490 times
Reputation: 14085
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Actually, what we need is a clean source to generate all the power to charge these batteries. Where do you think the power comes from?
The same place the engergy in fossil fuels originally came from:



Incidentally, nanotechnology may also hold the key to actually making solar power efficient.

The nanotech revolution in solar power | lightbucket

and that's just the beginning...
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