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Old 09-06-2014, 08:43 PM
 
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Good interview.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEtDLBGGQeQ
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Old 09-06-2014, 08:49 PM
 
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Be sure to check out the comments section on youtube.
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Old 09-06-2014, 09:55 PM
 
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Mostly right on.

He mentioned Tichitt and the Nok..also the Djenne-Djenno is one of the most ancient urbanized areas of west Africa. It could also be mentioned that the peopling of the Sahel and forest regions took place very gradually from the Lake Chad area, so there is a massive potential for archeology there. Little is known about the Sao civilization and its precursors.

He might be correct about literacy coming with Arabs, although is should be noted that there were ideographic writing systems such as Nsibidi, Adrinka and others, and I have seen it claimed that there was limited use of Tifinagh.

Academia could start to repair Africa's past immediately and cheaply. Everyone who takes an African history class has read the Epic of Sundiata, which, until relatively recently was part of the oral tradition of the griots. The other great stories of the griots could also be put to paper. There is real potential for someone to be West Africa's Livy, if they cared to do so.

Also, there are massive numbers of ancient books in libraries in Timbuktu, Gao, Djenne. A lot of those books concern Islam, but a number would be histories written in Ajami. I believe people are translating them now, but more work could be done.

A good piece on Djenne-Djenno:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9LkpJdll9A

Last edited by cachibatches; 09-06-2014 at 10:07 PM..
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cachibatches View Post

He might be correct about literacy coming with Arabs, although is should be noted that there were ideographic writing systems such as Nsibidi, Adrinka and others, and I have seen it claimed that there was limited use of Tifinagh.
I'm thinking that one of the reasons for there being less known about many parts of pre-colonial sub-saharan Africa is because many people didn't develop their own writing that would allow them to record events in their history as it was happening. Then historians could later use these writings as records. Also it doesn't seem like there were many structures that were built by west,central and southern Africans that would help to add to the presence of their civilizations. Great Zimbabwe is one of the few structures left like this.
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:18 PM
 
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A profile on the ruins of Great Zimbabwe.





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hk0-cCggHbQ
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I'm thinking that one of the reasons for there being less known about many parts of pre-colonial sub-saharan Africa is because many people didn't develop their own writing that would allow them to record events in their history as it was happening. Then historians could later use these writings as records. Also it doesn't seem like there were many structures that were built by west,central and southern Africans that would help to add to the presence of their civilizations. Great Zimbabwe is one of the few structures left like this.

But a lot of the information might still be there in the oral tradition, which is why I wish that someone was interesting in recording it.

I have heard it said that Nsibidi could record fairly complex ideas, although I suppose there just aren't a lot of records to study.

New structures are being discovered all of the time. There are some stone ruins at Loropeni, parts of the walls of Benin still stand, the massive moat of Sungbo's Eredu, I believe there are some stone ruins in Cameroon, etc.
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Old 09-06-2014, 11:39 PM
 
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I think it's good to see some knowledgeable open minded Europeans trying to clear up Africa's history. But ultimately it's gonna require that African historians and archaeologist start putting together the facts of their own history and then presenting it to the world through books and lectures etc. Whose telling us European history? European historians are.
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I think it's good to see some knowledgeable open minded Europeans trying to clear up Africa's history. But ultimately it's gonna require that African historians and archaeologist start putting together the facts of their own history and then presenting it to the world through books and lectures etc. Whose telling us European history? European historians are.
You make such a great point. Africans shouldn't be solely relying on European scholars to tell their history.
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Southwest Michigan/Miami Beach Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I think it's good to see some knowledgeable open minded Europeans trying to clear up Africa's history. But ultimately it's gonna require that African historians and archaeologist start putting together the facts of their own history and then presenting it to the world through books and lectures etc. Whose telling us European history? European historians are.

Great post great thread. Thanks for the video!
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Old 03-27-2019, 04:29 PM
 
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The archeology of many precolonial cities was similar to early Mesopotamian settlements. The ruins of Old Kano City in Nigeria are a good example:











Then there was the more advanced architecture of the Ashanti capital Kumasi:









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