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Old 02-10-2014, 12:21 PM
 
175 posts, read 350,691 times
Reputation: 235

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What a disgusting government!
To have forced people to kill their girl babies....and yes, the gov. FORCED them-if not there were consequences... Now it has become easy/routine for family members to kill their girls-they even show you how to do it...sic.
I had heard that the law was a bit easier-oh no-I read it somewhere! But another nurse in the hospital where I worked said "don't believe a word you hear-the women in my (her) country are still forced to kill their girl babies. It is not going to change ever, even if the law changed because of the culture seeing a female child as lowly garbage for so many generations".
The movie that came out /finished in 2013 shows how infanticide/gendercide is done.
For those of you who go to China to see the beautiful country, let how they value baby girls stay right there at the front of your thoughts...!
The movie says it is worse now than ever...
You can order the documentary on iTunes. Truth be told, folks! More than ever.. Reality.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:00 PM
 
32,103 posts, read 33,010,060 times
Reputation: 14956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sasha's View Post
What a disgusting government!
To have forced people to kill their girl babies....and yes, the gov. FORCED them-if not there were consequences... Now it has become easy/routine for family members to kill their girls-they even show you how to do it...sic.
I had heard that the law was a bit easier-oh no-I read it somewhere! But another nurse in the hospital where I worked said "don't believe a word you hear-the women in my (her) country are still forced to kill their girl babies. It is not going to change ever, even if the law changed because of the culture seeing a female child as lowly garbage for so many generations".
The movie that came out /finished in 2013 shows how infanticide/gendercide is done.
For those of you who go to China to see the beautiful country, let how they value baby girls stay right there at the front of your thoughts...!
The movie says it is worse now than ever...
You can order the documentary on iTunes. Truth be told, folks! More than ever.. Reality.
Do you have a link?
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:20 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
Reputation: 7586
What? Chinese government forces people to kill baby girls? Family "routine"? What kind of BS is that.

Where the hell did you get that from? Why do people keep crapping on China when they have not stepped a foot into the country at all?
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Old 02-10-2014, 03:42 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,188,447 times
Reputation: 11619
OP, the fact that I study with 3 young adult Chinese women kinda disproves your theory of their government forces them to kill their baby girls. What's with the Sinophobia, geez
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:12 PM
 
201 posts, read 265,262 times
Reputation: 69
I don't think the Chinese government forces its people to kill baby girls, BUT let's not kid ourselves that female infanticide in China never happened either.
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Old 02-10-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,799,161 times
Reputation: 4125
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
I don't think the Chinese government forces its people to kill baby girls, BUT let's not kid ourselves that female infanticide in China never happened either.
Thankfully the government is starting to rethink it's policy on the one-child household.

The OP's flawed sources would lead you to believe the government kills baby girls but that is not the case. On the same token, female infanticide happens every day in many less developed corners of the world due to the belief that male children will provide income and prosperity while girls will carry burden and financial liability. It's a woefully outdated mentality by many of the less educated.
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Old 02-11-2014, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,780 posts, read 13,365,753 times
Reputation: 11309
They've relaxed the one child policy so that if one of the parents comes from a one-child household, they can have two children. Since most people came from two family households from the 80's on, this means that over the next few years, you'll see more children born.

I see just as many if not more little girls in my area as little boys, and the class I teach has more girls than boys. There's certainly still a deficit of women to men that will become more prevalent over the next couple decades, especially outside the cities in rural areas, where the gender preference is more palpable - these areas will be the most impacted by the gap. But the attitude that the Chinese don't value girls or women, or that they're a rare sight is profoundly stupid.
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Old 02-11-2014, 11:37 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
But the attitude that the Chinese don't value girls or women, or that they're a rare sight is profoundly stupid.
first no Chinese women change her name after getting married;
second in the cities very few women would quit their job to be stay-at-home mothers.

Chinese women probably enjoy a higher status than women in many western countries.
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,780 posts, read 13,365,753 times
Reputation: 11309
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
first no Chinese women change her name after getting married;
second in the cities very few women would quit their job to be stay-at-home mothers.

Chinese women probably enjoy a higher status than women in many western countries.
In Chinese culture, it's common for the grandparents to have a huge hand in raising the children; if not them, then it's split among aunts, uncles, etc. so that both parents can stay at their jobs. It's much more a community effort than you find in the West, and that shows on into adulthood in a lot of ways.

One of my female coworkers told me that she wanted to have children someday, but she would prefer them to be girls, because "girls are cute and sweet, but boys have too much energy." I've seen so many couples and grandparents here who dote on their children, whether they're boys or girls... it's hard for a lot of people to accept that people are people, no matter where in the world they're from!
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Old 02-11-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Spokane, WA
1,990 posts, read 2,151,505 times
Reputation: 2363
India likes to selective abort as well. Womens right to their bodies is all this is. What are you some sort of racist homphobic racist patriarchal republican?

CHINA:
Female infanticide

Female Infanticide in India and China

China's Infanticide Epidemic

Case Study: Female Infanticide

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Winkler, Theodor H. (2005). "Slaughtering Eve The Hidden Gendercide". Women in an Insecure World. Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces.

INDIA:
Trash Bin Babies: India's Female Infanticide Crisis

Case Study: Female Infanticide

Female Infanticide in India and China

Agnivesh, Swami; Rama Mani; Angelika Köster-Lossack (25 November 2005). "Missing: 50 million Indian girls". New York Times. Retrieved 30 December 2013.

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Cave-Browne, John (1857). Indian infanticide: its origin, progress, and suppression. W. H. Allen & Co.

DeLugan, Robin Maria (2013). "Exposing Gendercide in India and China (Davis, Brown, and Denier's It’s a Girl—the Three Deadliest Words in the World )". Current Anthropology (University of Chicago Press) 54 (5): 649–650.

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Hundal, Sunny (8 August 2013). "India's 60 million women that never were". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 30 December 2013.

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