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Old 06-24-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
353 posts, read 820,744 times
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So The new iPad has 264 pixels per inch and the new MBP has 220 pixels per inch to make Apple call both Retina. A non-retina display is the MBA at 135 pixels per inch.

So somewhere between 135 ppi and 220 ppi is the borderline between "non-Retina" and "Retina".
Does anyone know the number and/or the approximate number range of that border?
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Old 06-24-2012, 08:25 PM
 
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Quote:
The screen is marketed by Apple as the "Retina display", based on the assertion that a display of approximately 300 ppi at a distance of 12 inches (305 mm) from one's eye, or 57 arcseconds per pixel[42] is the maximum amount of detail that the human retina can perceive.[43] With the iPhone expected to be used at a distance of about 12 inches from the eyes, a higher resolution would allegedly have no effect on the image's apparent quality as the maximum potential of the human eye has already been met.
This claim has been disputed. Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies, said in an interview with Wired magazine, that the claims by Jobs are something of an exaggeration: "It is reasonably close to being a perfect display, but Steve pushed it a little too far". Soneira stated that the resolution of the human retina is higher than claimed by Apple, working out to 477 ppi at 12 inches (305 mm) from the eyes, or 36 arcseconds per pixel.[44]
However, Phil Plait, author of Bad Astronomy, whose career includes a collaboration with NASA regarding the camera on the Hubble Space Telescope, responded to the criticism by stating that "if you have [better than 20/20] eyesight, then at one foot away the iPhone 4's pixels are resolved. The picture will look pixellated. If you have average eyesight, the picture will look just fine".[45][46]
Source:
iPhone 4 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


It's purely a marketing term, there is no "line" that makes it non retina vs retina, it's whatever apple says it is.
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Old 06-25-2012, 09:25 AM
 
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It probably depends on each individual as well. Some people have better vision than others so they'll notice pixelation on a screen that others don't.
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:32 AM
 
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At viewing distance which is holding it in your hands the numbers I've seen cited is between 250 to 300.
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:40 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kazyn View Post

It's purely a marketing term, there is no "line" that makes it non retina vs retina, it's whatever apple says it is.
It really depends on the viewing distance, if you were looking at a photo on the wall from couple of feet you're not going to see any difference between one printed at 150DPI or one printed at 300DPI. When you bring it up closer then you will see the difference, the closer it gets the more details that will emerge in the higher resolution image. As already mentioned you also have differences between each persons vision.

Technically speaking Apples claim is pretty accurate.
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:20 AM
 
2,182 posts, read 4,706,348 times
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Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
It really depends on the viewing distance, if you were looking at a photo on the wall from couple of feet you're not going to see any difference between one printed at 150DPI or one printed at 300DPI. When you bring it up closer then you will see the difference, the closer it gets the more details that will emerge in the higher resolution image. As already mentioned you also have differences between each persons vision.

Technically speaking Apples claim is pretty accurate.
Of course, but it's still a term coined by and used by apple, there is no hard line that says that one display is retina while the other isn't. If they think the display has high enough PPI, depending on the device (I say that because phones are usually held closer to your face, while laptops are much farther away), they will deem it a retina display.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:14 PM
 
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It's the first time I've heard the term but it's something I've researched a long time ago for print, there was a very lengthy and detailed article I can't seem to find on it.
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