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Old 06-20-2008, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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I think they are something like a crumpet but to know for sure we need to find an English person who has had both.

I think its funny in our foods how we label something like English Muffins, or French toast or French frys when they are entirely American.

Can you think of more examples?

Anyone from England or France can tell us what French toast is called in France or if you have it at all?
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:01 AM
 
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That's like when I was in Banff and asked them do I ask for bacon or Canadian Bacon
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prinny View Post
That's like when I was in Banff and asked them do I ask for bacon or Canadian Bacon
LOL, exactly.

When I was in the UK and had a bacon sandwich, it wasn't anything like they have here. The bacon looked MORE like Canadian Bacon but I' guessing they don't call it that.
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:08 AM
 
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These people will look at you like you're crazy too! I always ask questions too! It embaresses my husband but I want to know EVERYTHING including every last detail about what I'm eating!
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Sheffield, England
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I'm from England and to me a muffin is a muffin. I wasn't aware there were different varieties.

As for french toast, I regularly go to France and have never seen it there. The only time I've ever seen it on a menu was when I went to New York.
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC (Charlotte 'burb)
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Dont even think about asking where to get Buffalo wings in Western New York. They are "wings" or "chicken wings."
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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French toast comes from the french pain perdu, or lost bread.
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boycew02 View Post
I'm from England and to me a muffin is a muffin. I wasn't aware there were different varieties.

As for french toast, I regularly go to France and have never seen it there. The only time I've ever seen it on a menu was when I went to New York.
An English Muffin is almost like a scone but more bready, hard to explain, its savory, not sweet. You can actually make a pizza on them if you want. Toast them and put jam and butter on them.
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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English muffins are delicious with butter on them. Toasted nice and crisp.

Here's a picture.


http://images.jupiterimages.com/comm...4/23236463.jpg

They don't remind me of scones at all, all the scones I've encountered have been much more crumbly and heavy and cakey.
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Old 06-20-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC (Charlotte 'burb)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsey_Mcfarren View Post
An English Muffin is almost like a scone but more bready, hard to explain, its savory, not sweet. You can actually make a pizza on them if you want. Toast them and put jam and butter on them.
Yes, they are full of nooks and crannies Products
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