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Old 03-31-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: WI
3,819 posts, read 8,886,942 times
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we recently moved from WI to SC, myself driving a 26' uhaul and my wife driving our suv pulling our boat ( with dog in her ride ). The driving wasn't too bad, but with the larger/longer rigs it is more difficult to just pull in somewhere to get gas or food ( or even a hotel at last minute ).

One thing to look into: we also had to deal with my wife's car. Uhaul wanted nearly 500 for a trailer for us to haul it down here. Instead I paid 650 for a transport to deliver the car for us. I wanted to keep the uhaul truck's hitch open in case something happened to our tow vehicle and I needed to pull the boat; plus spending the extra 150 was worth not having to deal with it.

And who knows, if you dont have to haul your car down, then do you still need that same size truck for moving your furniture?
Just some food for thought.
Good luck
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Old 03-31-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 23,102,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ap0110 View Post
I'm planning an interstate move - California to Texas - and am contemplating the cheapest option, which would be renting a 14 foot truck and towing my car. I also have a cat who, I guess, would be my passenger.

I'll be honest. The whole prospect TERRIFIES me. I don't drive trucks, much less vans, much less moving vans towing cars. I've also never driven 3-4 days with my cat.

Have any of you done this? What was your experience? What should I watch out for? Any advice for first-timers?

Thanks!
It seems that most of the advice given has been regarding your cat, which is great! I'd like to talk about the mechanics of the trip - driving a truck and towing a car.


First of all, a 14' UHaul is not that big a truck, nor is the wheelbase terribly long. Just remember to take wide corners (so you don't run up on all the curbs) and get used to looking in your mirrors. Take it slow until you get a good feel for the truck. Also, remember that you cannot just pull into any old parking lot and turn around!

Second, towing your car: If it's a front-wheel drive car, I'd recommend renting a car DOLLY instead of car trailer. You drive your front wheels up on the dolly, and the back tires of your vehicle roll just as if you were actually driving it. I recommend a dolly because it is lighter, and doesn't have the car sitting up as high. It's just easier to tow. *Remember though, don't get yourself into a parking lot where you have to try to back up. If you're not experienced doing that, it'd be a nightmare.


I hope that's at least moderately helpful. Holler if you have any more questions.
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Old 03-31-2009, 11:48 AM
 
Location: WI
3,819 posts, read 8,886,942 times
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[quote=Omaha Rocks;8124252] Also, remember that you cannot just pull into any old parking lot and turn around!

*Remember though, don't get yourself into a parking lot where you have to try to back up. If you're not experienced doing that, it'd be a nightmare.
quote]

those are solid reminders to anyone who has never pulled a trailer. doesn't matter of it's a dolly, or a boat, or a camper--it takes time to learn the different capabilities when driving down the road ( including stopping distance ), plus the above mentioned cornering and backing up. Even changing lanes or passing others--you have to remember you have something behind that you are responsible for.

Not trying to make it scarier then it is; in fact my wife ( who's previous experience with our boat was at launches only ) had no issues pulling it the 1000 miles here. Were there some nervous times? you bet. But we made it unscathed.

of course as we tell the story of our first out-of-state move, it does seem to sound like Chevy Chase in "Vacation"...
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Old 03-31-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,532 posts, read 2,339,678 times
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Oh, the joys of moving! I have done that a few times! Look at it this way, you will probably have some kind of funny stories to tell!

I think the cats are better off in a sturdy carrier, for the most part. I had one that actually liked to ride in cars, and would put his paws on the window and look out, but that is rare!!

One of my memories from moving with pets took place in the summer with the a/c broke in my car and two large dogs! I was sweating to death, thinking things couldn't get much worse, until - - - - one of the dogs barfed on me!!! So, I proceeded to make the people at the rest areas day much more eventful as I tried to wrestle two dogs that weighed as much as I did, clean barf off of myself, and try to drench myself and the dogs from the drinking fountain so we could manage another 100 miles!!

Good luck in your travels!!
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Old 04-01-2009, 01:04 PM
 
27 posts, read 190,536 times
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[quote=dsh1127;8125658]It seems that most of the advice given has been regarding your cat, which is great! I'd like to talk about the mechanics of the trip - driving a truck and towing a car.
quote]

I was one who chimed in about travelling with my cat , but I do have an anecdote to offer as far as driving a panel truck.

I used to work for an office furniture company and they used panel trucks, similar to a U-Haul, for their deliveries. Whenever I'm pulling into traffic and I see one coming down the road - and I think about jetting out in front of them cause I don't want to get 'stuck' behind them - I hear my dispatcher's voice saying "We can GO as fast as everyone else - we just can't STOP as fast". I usually sit and wait patiently for the truck to pass.

Just remember that not everyone will have that little voice in their head, and they *will* pull out in front of you - even tho you're 10x bigger than they are. While you can only make so many allowances for the stupidity of other drivers, I'd be especially vigilant when driving thru towns and such. Safe travel to you..
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
322 posts, read 786,665 times
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I'm enjoying this thread and finding it informative. I am going to move from Fairbanks, Alaska to Austin, Texas and I have FIVE kitties coming in the car with me. You might want to see my thread on the "cats" forum about the long distance move with cats. I've also gotten good tips there.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:09 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,675,284 times
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I recommend that you have a crade for traveling witht eh cat and one of those largter foldup crates for teh motel rooms tat is l;arge enough for a liiter box ;water and food.Gte the trnquilzers from your vet . Have a bag with water;papertowels and ziplock bags just in case the cat throws up. get a harness/lease for the cat and take it out of the crate for water very once in awhile.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,081 posts, read 12,936,118 times
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Are you sure you can tow a car with a 14 ft rental truck? My daughter rented a U-Haul truck and a car trailer and the smallest truck they would let her tow with was a 26 footer.

Itís not a good idea to let the cat ride in the towed vehicle. It gets hot back there, and if you crack the windows hoping to let fresh air in, all you will do is fill the vehicle up with exhaust from the truck.

Letting her ride without being in a carrier or cage is also a bad idea. Itís just about impossible to prevent a cat from bolting out the door if she isnít contained in a carrier.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:48 AM
 
325 posts, read 1,025,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
Are you sure you can tow a car with a 14 ft rental truck? My daughter rented a U-Haul truck and a car trailer and the smallest truck they would let her tow with was a 26 footer.

Itís not a good idea to let the cat ride in the towed vehicle. It gets hot back there, and if you crack the windows hoping to let fresh air in, all you will do is fill the vehicle up with exhaust from the truck.

Letting her ride without being in a carrier or cage is also a bad idea. Itís just about impossible to prevent a cat from bolting out the door if she isnít contained in a carrier.

Oh, yes I agree! The safest and most comfortable place for the kitty will be in the cab of the moving truck with you , safely in a carrier. We recently moved with 4 cats!
It would not be good for kitty to ride in the towed vehicle, and riding free in the cab of the moving van is risky, because he/she is already stressed and could bolt at one of your stops.
My babies did pretty good. I don't know if your cat will cry or not, but one of mine did. Then when it finally quit crying, I stopped to check on it and it started all over again! Once he/she settles down, let him/her be.

Good luck to you.
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Old 04-09-2009, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Farmington Valley, CT
502 posts, read 1,205,301 times
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Please ask your vet or ASPCA on the proper way to treat your cat during a move and do NOT put your cat up on the roof of your car. Please avoid "drugging" your cat; but rather, take it on gradually longer car rides to get used to traveling. The cat will probably not eat, drink, or use litterbox until out of the car. We stopped at rest areas and put a drinking straw into some bottled water, capped the top of the straw with finger to create "eyedropper" effect, and put in kittys mouth at rest stop to hydrate her a little. (since she was too frightened to drink). If you can get a small pen instead of the carrier, the cat will get more fresh air and not feel so boxed in. We have a minivan type car, and use a dog pen in the back, elevated, with the door facing the front so I can reach back and pet and console her if she starts crying. She cried a little at first, but then "meditated" the rest of the way, although panting sometimes from stress, she did beautifully for 18+ hours. Let air circulate around pen, and raise up enough so kitty can see out. Mine actually took an interest in passing cars/trucks from time to time. Also play soothing music if you can. I don't especially like Enya, but it seemed to calm my cat.

Best Wishes
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