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Old 12-28-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,332,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryFisher View Post
Because many of them care about stupid things like "diversity", "nightlife" etc. I never understood why some people, especially people on here care about things like but each to their own.

However, I'm 21 and couldn't care less about these things. Most people also stick with their own kinds anyway.
I love getting drunk and hooking up with random Hispanic women!

No, seriously though, that sounds kinda fun to me (and I'm 31 and white as snow)!
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,603,348 times
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You mostly answered your own question.

A better question would be, why did the U.S. start building suburbs in the first place? Dense cities came before them. I see it just as a natural retraction for something that was funded and fueled by the government, white flight, etc.

It's more about liberal social attitude, big cities are generally better about having open minded and diversity of views.

Also, jobs, esp white collar jobs are often only found in big cities, especially as they become more specialized. With more people going to college, it's no surprise that people want a payoff from their investment. I'm sure some go to big cities because the wages and job availability of where they are from aren't that great.

Intellectual pursuits are generally easier in big cities, and I find that I can relate to more people there and have deeper or more open minded conversations. People are often more current in what is going on in the world and are less likely to let things like tradition and religion get in the way of things.

Pedestrian friendly, honestly, it's much healthier walking and taking public transit than driving everywhere. A great benefit if you ask me.

More people are environmentally friendly also, living in a city cuts down on carbon footprints and such.

Also, as an introvert, I feel like I can be more private in a large city and not see the same people every day, even if I like the people, I don't necessarily want to see the same people all the time, cliche, but I like every day to be a new adventure. People mind their business in big cities, but if you feel like you want to hang out, you have that option also.

Last edited by grapico; 12-28-2012 at 10:55 AM..
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Old 12-28-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,332,888 times
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^It's all about wanting what you don't have (i.e. "the grass is always greener" effect). The few people I've met from dense NE cities like NYC seem to want to live in or retire in vast open spaces like deserts, and hate the notion of living in a dense urban environment. I can't tell if it's an age thing or just the "grass is always greener" effect. All of my family who were originally from the City of Chicago have moved out to the suburbs in search of lots and lots of open land.....none of them want to be crowded in anymore. Besides, once people have mobile children, parks and open space is a huge amenity for those families and suburbs suit them very well much of the time.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:13 PM
 
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Thing is too that some cities are so dull and boring even if they have a lot of population.

I know a city with 28,000 population (mostly because it used to be a city with 50,000 population but split into two cities) that has as much as a city with 75,000 population, but then I know cities with 70,000 population that feel as dull as a town with 20,000 population.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:52 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,652,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southseeker View Post
I really don't have a whole lot to add. The OP pretty much answered their own question. As a young person myself, the reason why I'd prefer a big city is for pretty much all the reasons you listed. For me, jobs and diversity are really major factors as to what city I eventually choose to move to. I grew up getting a long with people from all different backgrounds, so it would be somewhat of a culture shock for me to go to a city that wasn't really diverse at all. Also, yes, I have to be in a place where I'm entertained! Not just bars and clubs, but legitimately, I can find things to do outside of eating and going to the movies.

As for as the liberal vs conservative thing, I dunno it's fair to say every young person is a liberal. Yet, I do think it's fair to say that young people are generally more open minded, and generally want the same things. A good example would be my sister. She is very conservative, but she too would rather live in a bigger city, because she'd rather meet people from all walks of life, have more things to do, and better jobs.
Many young people find suburbs are just filled with box stores and homes and lack of night clubs ,bars and restaurants.

Also some young people don't want to live in house for some reason but above store.
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Old 12-28-2012, 02:22 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,906,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Many young people find suburbs are just filled with box stores and homes and lack of night clubs ,bars and restaurants.

Also some young people don't want to live in house for some reason but above store.
Don't mistake suburbs with suburban cities. Costa Mesa, Irvine, Chula Vista, Newport Beach, Carlsbad, and other cities are very suburban but have a lot going on for the youth.
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Old 12-28-2012, 04:08 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,209,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Thing is too that some cities are so dull and boring even if they have a lot of population.

I know a city with 28,000 population (mostly because it used to be a city with 50,000 population but split into two cities) that has as much as a city with 75,000 population, but then I know cities with 70,000 population that feel as dull as a town with 20,000 population.
Can you really call a town with less than 100,000 people a "city"?

I'm pretty sure you can ask a lot of people on this forum, and they will definately tell you that 75,000 isn't really a lot. Here in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, 75,000 people is practically nothing.... but a suburb.
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Old 12-28-2012, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Louisiana
494 posts, read 1,454,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Can you really call a town with less than 100,000 people a "city"?

I'm pretty sure you can ask a lot of people on this forum, and they will definately tell you that 75,000 isn't really a lot. Here in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, 75,000 people is practically nothing.... but a suburb.

Have to agree, I don't consider a place with less than 100,00 people a city at all. A town or suburb, maybe, but definitely not the type of city I have in mind. That's not to diminish the places that thecity listed, but when I say big cities. I mean places likes Dallas, NY, Seattle, San Fransisco, Atlanta, etc.
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Old 12-28-2012, 06:27 PM
 
56,807 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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What if the city with less than 100,000 people is more dense than bigger cities and offers some urban amenities?
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Old 12-28-2012, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
892 posts, read 1,851,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stockwiz View Post
I like feeling like a fly on the wall. I don't like living in towns small enough where everybody gets to know each other, I prefer the anonymous feel. I get exhausted saying 'hi' and waving at every single person who walks by, I want to be left alone except within my social circle to be honest. I suppose that's that "off putting" thing the above poster described.

That's not exactly what I meant. I wasn't talking about really small towns, but more about mid-sized cities like Albuquerque, SLC, Boise, Milwaukee, Lincoln, etc. Places that are big enough where you still won't stop to wave hello to everyone you see. However, I get a much friendlier vibe from people in the smaller cities than I did visiting places like LA, SD, Chicago, and even to some extent here in Phoenix. I don't expect everyone to say hello and try to engage me in conversation, but the really big cities are just a bit too detached for my liking. I have a feeling I would think the same about NYC, but I have never had any desire to go and don't expect to ever do so in the future, so I guess I will never know I think some of this may have to do with regional differences as well; I find that Denver has a similar vibe to some smaller cities I mentioned though it is larger in population. Perhaps the Western US is just more laid back and friendly so that contributes to my observations, but I do feel city size is part of it as LA is in the West but I still get an off-putting vibe from people there.
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