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Old 09-22-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,411 posts, read 79,618,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Here are 10 good recommendations.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/ways-...ctions-3522648

I've been fortunate for some time..
used to get them, but haven't had one in maybe, 30 years or more.

AS for Cranberry juice I have heard this for years and the same about water. I do drink a good amount of water, but not nearly as much as suggested and we drink cranberry juice sometimes but certainly not on a regular basis. I am also guilty and have always been of not using the bathroom as often as I should. I will hold it for hours. No, I know it is a really bad habit, but at almost 82, I doubt I will be breaking the habit in the next few years. I also take baths, not showers. I have always loved my bath and as long as I can get in and out of the tub it will be bath for me.

Last edited by nmnita; 09-22-2018 at 12:36 PM..
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Old 09-22-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,411 posts, read 79,618,227 times
Reputation: 38727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harpaint View Post
My husband (78yo) had a UTI and the Dr. told me that in the elderly, it is equal among men and women getting UTIs. She thinks it is because of fluid restriction for fear of incontinence in both genders.
good point. We have noticed,recently more of our male friends seem to be getting them.
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Old 09-22-2018, 12:26 PM
 
18,989 posts, read 6,213,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
cipto is an antibiotic.
Yes it is and a class that does cause a lot of damage which my friend dealt with, the MD gave her the strongest type abx and she had no clue of the class it belongs in.

https://www.webmd.com/brain/news/201...nolone-warning

We've had a lot of discussions here on this class of abx drugs.

Good to keep the water moving for good kidney health.
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Old 09-22-2018, 12:29 PM
 
18,989 posts, read 6,213,032 times
Reputation: 12777
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
used to get them, but haven't had one in maybe, 30 years or more.
Same here, as I said above I had about 3 or so in my younger life and back then one of the drugs they gave us was a sulfa drug and I remember the urine turned reddish. And if the UTI was really bad, penicillin was given. All this drug history makes me realize more about my age and where all the medicine has come to. Wonder if sulfa drugs are still prescribed, very Cheap class of drugs.

Ah, just occurred to me, I've been taking MSM for many yrs and it's a sulphur support, could be helping in this UTI area too.
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Old 09-22-2018, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,566 posts, read 26,190,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Same here, as I said above I had about 3 or so in my younger life and back then one of the drugs they gave us was a sulfa drug and I remember the urine turned reddish. And if the UTI was really bad, penicillin was given. All this drug history makes me realize more about my age and where all the medicine has come to. Wonder if sulfa drugs are still prescribed, very Cheap class of drugs.

Ah, just occurred to me, I've been taking MSM for many yrs and it's a sulphur support, could be helping in this UTI area too.
Yes, sulfonamides are still prescribed for UTIs. Septra and Bactrim contain sulfamethoxazole. The choice of antibiotic depends on the bacteria causing the infection, not how bad the symptoms are, and penicillin usually does not cover them these days.

Sulfonamides do not cause the urine to turn orange. That would be due to a bladder analgesic called pyridium, often prescribed to help with symptoms while the antibiotic treats the infection.
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Old 09-22-2018, 04:33 PM
 
18,989 posts, read 6,213,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Yes, sulfonamides are still prescribed for UTIs. Septra and Bactrim contain sulfamethoxazole. The choice of antibiotic depends on the bacteria causing the infection, not how bad the symptoms are, and penicillin usually does not cover them these days.

Sulfonamides do not cause the urine to turn orange. That would be due to a bladder analgesic called pyridium, often prescribed to help with symptoms while the antibiotic treats the infection.
Well in the old days, I was given one kinda reddish tablet and my urine came out a reddish or orangish color ..and how does a doctor know which bacteria is causing the problem, wouldn't they have to do a urine work to find that...and they never did that in my cases. Just gave the sulfa drug and it went to work. Just goes to show how much I know about the drug world.
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,566 posts, read 26,190,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Well in the old days, I was given one kinda reddish tablet and my urine came out a reddish or orangish color ..and how does a doctor know which bacteria is causing the problem, wouldn't they have to do a urine work to find that...and they never did that in my cases. Just gave the sulfa drug and it went to work. Just goes to show how much I know about the drug world.
The reddish tablet contained an orange dye that soothes the irritated bladder lining. It does not treat the infection at all.

https://www.medicinenet.com/phenazop...pyridine-oral?

Ideally, it is better to culture the bacteria to confirm that an infection is present (other conditions can cause the same symptoms, including some STDs) and test various antibiotics to see which ones will work against the bacteria in the urine.

https://labtestsonline.org/tests/urine-culture

Treating without doing a culture is fine if the treatment works.

Anyone with frequent UTIs should probably have a culture each time, to see whether it is a new infection or a relapse of a previous one.
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Old 09-22-2018, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
1,831 posts, read 2,421,535 times
Reputation: 3098
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Well in the old days, I was given one kinda reddish tablet and my urine came out a reddish or orangish color ..and how does a doctor know which bacteria is causing the problem, wouldn't they have to do a urine work to find that...and they never did that in my cases. Just gave the sulfa drug and it went to work. Just goes to show how much I know about the drug world.

As Suzy said, the reddish-orange urine was due to pyridium, a urinary analgesic that treats the symptoms of a uti, but not the uti itself. Typically, we treat the infections empirically (i.e. we use antibiotics or sulfonamides that treat most uti's) either while a urine culture is pending, or without a culture. If the symptoms persist, or if the patient keeps getting uti's, we will usually do a culture and sensitivity test which determines the specific organism that is causing the uti and tells us which antibiotics will be effective against that organism. A lot of health care providers use sulfa drugs for initial therapy, but I tend not to, because of potentially serious side effects they might cause. Besides sulfonamides, the most common drugs we use for uti's are ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin and its derivatives and tetracycline derivatives. We also use ampicillin and amoxicillin, cephalosporins like cephalexin, and levofloxacin.
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Old 09-22-2018, 08:40 PM
 
18,989 posts, read 6,213,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vrexy View Post
As Suzy said, the reddish-orange urine was due to pyridium, a urinary analgesic that treats the symptoms of a uti, but not the uti itself. Typically, we treat the infections empirically (i.e. we use antibiotics or sulfonamides that treat most uti's) either while a urine culture is pending, or without a culture. If the symptoms persist, or if the patient keeps getting uti's, we will usually do a culture and sensitivity test which determines the specific organism that is causing the uti and tells us which antibiotics will be effective against that organism. A lot of health care providers use sulfa drugs for initial therapy, but I tend not to, because of potentially serious side effects they might cause. Besides sulfonamides, the most common drugs we use for uti's are ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin and its derivatives and tetracycline derivatives. We also use ampicillin and amoxicillin, cephalosporins like cephalexin, and levofloxacin.
Yes, I read suzy's info. Are you a doctor also? I'm glad I have not had to take abx drugs for any of this stuff and as I have said have not had UTI in over 30 yrs or so. I would refuse Cipro etc.
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Old 09-22-2018, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
1,831 posts, read 2,421,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Yes, I read suzy's info. Are you a doctor also? I'm glad I have not had to take abx drugs for any of this stuff and as I have said have not had UTI in over 30 yrs or so. I would refuse Cipro etc.
No, I am a not a doctor. I am nurse practitioner who is married to a family practice/internal medicine doctor. He is one of the top rated MD's in the country - based on recommendations by other physicians. He's one of the doctors who other doctors say they would send their family members to and that they choose as one of the best. Based on the comments you have posted, I think you would like him. He's very open minded and one who truly listens to his patients and respects their feelings and opinions, as do I. He is not at all opposed to alternative medicine, and neither am I, but we both think that all options should be considered and taken into account. You can't take good care of someone if you aren't willing to listen to them and respect them.

Why do you say you would refuse Cipro? What if you had an infection of some sort and a culture that says that Cipro was the best treatment? Would you still refuse to take it? If so, why?
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