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Old 11-23-2016, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,498,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC_Sleuth View Post
Democratic voting counties are overwhelming urban, high-density environments with some suburbs mixed in. There's more people in 'em on a per-county basis, so naturally GDP will be higher. There are fewer of these counties in America than rural, more sparsely populated ones. It also doesn't mean there needs should necessarily be prioritized over rural, less populated counties. Somebody needs to do the farming and mining...

Also, according to polls most of the people higher up the income scale went for Trump. So, while blue urban counties that contribute more to GDP go democrat, the people who are making the most money in those blue counties tend to vote republican.
Which is no different than any other republican candidate. I think the difference is Trump ran a VERY different campaign and he has developed a new set of supporters (mostly the blue collar, working class but also a lot of extreme right wing and racist type groups). I think that's what people on the left are most upset about. Not that a republican won.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:28 PM
 
605 posts, read 423,216 times
Reputation: 1086
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I agree. I just seem to be defending the midwest a lot lately. A lot of people out here don't get why rural landlocked states are so worried about things that effect the coastal states much more. Terror, migration, etc. People just want to have their progressive laws and not be told by the conservative midwest/south what they can and can't do. I guess the same goes for people wanting guns etc. Both candidates were terrible choices and supporters of both are being pretty stupid. I personally thought Hillary was the lesser of the two evils, but lots of people think the other way.

Happy Thanksgiving!
Maybe Missouri and Kansas are different since they have a more right wing evangelical slant to their states compared with the rest of the country, but I think most Midwesterners and Americans in general were more concerned about bad trade deals that could cause their state to lose manufacturing jobs like the TTP than terrorism or migration which is why states like Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania turned red this year. The fact that Obama/Bill Clinton helped create TTP/NAFTA agreements probably did not help matters either for Hillary's campaign.
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Old 11-24-2016, 11:34 PM
 
132 posts, read 109,686 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I agree. I just seem to be defending the midwest a lot lately. A lot of people out here don't get why rural landlocked states are so worried about things that effect the coastal states much more. Terror, migration, etc. People just want to have their progressive laws and not be told by the conservative midwest/south what they can and can't do. I guess the same goes for people wanting guns etc. Both candidates were terrible choices and supporters of both are being pretty stupid. I personally thought Hillary was the lesser of the two evils, but lots of people think the other way.

Happy Thanksgiving!
I had to defend it endlessly when I lived in Philly, it's a fruitless endeavor. A very high percentage of east coast residents never leave the east coast corridor and it shows. These 'least coasters' view the midwest as the hill billy frontier of the wild west. Discussion on Chicago and their lack of knowledge about it was absolutely cringe worthy.

"I have heard Chicago is like Wilmington"

"Do you still ride horses for transportation out there?"

"I think intellectualism is unpopular in the midwest because you guys have to work in the fields so much."
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Old 11-25-2016, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,661 posts, read 1,770,490 times
Reputation: 2200
Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
I heard it to, but it's the opposite to me. A small town with a big city feel. No matter how many "big city" attractions there are, the people will be "country" to me. Not bad, but they like things slower pace/keeping to self
Quote:
Originally Posted by adebord View Post
I moved here from Philadelphia. Philly doesn't have much more, if anything going on. The only thing I miss is the direct europe flights.

Cities like NYC, LA, Miami are in a different league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartfordd View Post
I'm living in Northern France more exactly in Lille, I am a high school student in scientific section and I am interested in meteorology therefore I pretty like the central region of United State of America for his seasonnal climate and amazing weather phenomenon such like tornadoes, heavy downpour, thunderstorms etc.
I like cities like Philadelphia for urban life and I want to know the differences of city life between Philadelphia and Kansas City.
I'm probably going to echo what KC_Sleuth and kcmo have said, but as a native Kansas Citian now residing in Philadelphia, I think I can provide some additional perspective and nuance.

(BTW, Hartfordd, when I was in grade school, I maintained a pen-pal relationship with a boy who lived in the Paris suburb of St.-Denis for a while. I think that led to my choosing French as my foreign language in high school (more Americans take Spanish than French where they take a foreign language for reasons that should be obvious). The letters stopped after I included a photo of myself in one of the ones I sent. I'm African-American. I have no idea how well the National Front's doing in Paris' northern suburbs, which I hear are pretty working-class.)

Back to the topic: I frequently draw parallels between my native and adopted states and cities, and I also consider myself an evangelist for my real hometown in my adopted one, especially since I've gone back to KC and have seen just how lively it's become. (I bought a T-shirt on my most recent visit that reads, "I lived in Kansas City BEFORE it was cool.")

KC has always been a very pleasant place to live. The knock on it when I was growing up there was, "It's a nice place to live, but I wouldn't want to visit there." That's definitely no longer the case.

Philadelphia likewise had a historical reputation for being rather boring, as reflected in a one-liner from native son W.C. Fields: "I went to Philadelphia on a Sunday, but it was closed." (The epitaph he wanted on his grave - "On the whole, I'd rather be in Philadelphia" - also reflects this). And in the 33 years since I moved to Philly, it too has gotten a lot livelier and more interesting. You never saw sidewalks packed with people going to shops and restaurants after about 6 p.m. in the 1980s. Since the late 1990s, that's the normal state of affairs around here. Likewise, Westport - the oldest part of Kansas City - was much sleepier in the 1970s than it is now, and again, the sidewalks are thronged with revelers - or were on the weekend nights I've visited.

I also say of my adopted home town that it's "a small town masquerading as a big city." For a city of 1.5 million (that's the core city population, which is only about 750,000 fewer than the population of metropolitan Kansas City), it has a strong everyone-knows-everyone-else quality about it, and local newscasters pass for Celebrities. Were I a native Philadelphian, I wouldn't look down my nose at KC, and none of the Philly natives who know me make that mistake.

The ones I know who have been to both KC and StL far prefer KC, btw.

What Philly has that KC doesn't:
--real rapid transit
--a bigger industrial legacy (which is not to say that KC doesn't have industry; anyone who's been through Fairfax or the Blue River Valley should know otherwise)
--a longer history, including its role as the nation's birthplace
--a more diverse culinary scene (but KC's made great strides in that department)
--about 4 million more residents in the metropolitan area

What KC has that Phiily doesn't:
--ease of getting around, albeit it's drive-everywhere outside a very small part of the city (this is perhaps the biggest obstacle to my returning there, as I'm definitely a subway junkie. Love the streetcar, which seems just right for KC, though, as I wrote in that column in 435).
--much, much, MUCH better barbecue
--more greenery, better distributed throughout the city (Philly's largely resides in its parks)
--Midwestern glad-to-meet-you friendliness

I'd rate them even on:
--charming small-town suburbs surrounding them
--municipal inferiority complexes, though I'd say KC has pretty much gotten over its. Philly's still working its way through the issue; having NYC for a next-door neighbor doesn't help, although we love stories about New Yorkers relocating to Philly in search of a lively city they can afford to live in

By the way, someone mentioned Lawrence above? Midwestern college towns are way cool, and Lawrence is no exception to that rule. And were it not for KU's presence, its county would probably be part of the KC metro area now, as the city's only a half hour from downtown Kansas City. (For many years, Leavenworth County, home to the first city in Kansas, wasn't either thanks to the Army base and Federal penitentiary there.)

BTW, KC_Sleuth, how old are you? You're the first person in quite a while that I've heard use the phrase "Nelson Art Gallery" to refer to the city's preeminent art museum. That's what I called it growing up, even though its full technical name has always been "The William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art-Mary Atkins Museum of Fine Arts" and its management and publicity materials now call it the "Nelson-Atkins," correcting a serious historical slight.

For anyone who cares: I cut my teeth in my profession working at the newspaper Nelson founded.
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Old 11-25-2016, 06:19 AM
 
990 posts, read 878,033 times
Reputation: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post

BTW, KC_Sleuth, how old are you? You're the first person in quite a while that I've heard use the phrase "Nelson Art Gallery" to refer to the city's preeminent art museum. That's what I called it growing up, even though its full technical name has always been "The William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art-Mary Atkins Museum of Fine Arts" and its management and publicity materials now call it the "Nelson-Atkins," correcting a serious historical slight.

For anyone who cares: I cut my teeth in my profession working at the newspaper Nelson founded.
37. I have lived in KC for 10 years now (to the month, actually). I know it's called the Nelson-Atkins, and I don't mean any slight...but I just abbreviate it "The Nelson". It's quicker to say. Back east where I'm from we shorten the names of everything. Also, the old-timers where I am from convert place names to the possessive: so if I were to speak true old-school Buffalo, it would be "Nelson's Art Gallery".

Last edited by KC_Sleuth; 11-25-2016 at 06:31 AM..
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Old 11-25-2016, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
5,498 posts, read 5,158,157 times
Reputation: 3267
MarketStEl - nice comparo of KC and Philly. Really an informative read for someone like myself - my wife and I just moved in to Grandview about 3 1/2 months ago - we're really KC "babies." Our minds are open sponges for KC information. For myself, since I love history, I love all of the KC...wait for it...history. Really good read - thanks!
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Old 11-25-2016, 02:07 PM
 
132 posts, read 109,686 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
I'd rate them even on:
--charming small-town suburbs surrounding them
--municipal inferiority complexes, though I'd say KC has pretty much gotten over its. Philly's still working its way through the issue; having NYC for a next-door neighbor doesn't help, although we love stories about New Yorkers relocating to Philly in search of a lively city they can afford to live in
lol, totally forgot about this. Philadelphia has a disproportionately large inferiority complex that seems to center around it's sports teams.

-Direct flights to Europe are great though. I can't stress this enough if you have to travel for work.
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Old 11-25-2016, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,661 posts, read 1,770,490 times
Reputation: 2200
Quote:
Originally Posted by adebord View Post
lol, totally forgot about this. Philadelphia has a disproportionately large inferiority complex that seems to center around it's sports teams.

-Direct flights to Europe are great though. I can't stress this enough if you have to travel for work.
If the focus is on the sports teams, Philly will never get over it, for most of the time, even when they're great, they disappoint, with occasional exceptions, mainly the Phillies of late. Of which speaking: Let's not forget who the Phillies beat to win their first-ever World Series title in 1980 (it happened to be that team's first World Series ever as well, after a half-decade in which it owned the American League West only to be mowed down in the league championship series by the (ahem) New York Yankees three years running. I had to experience the anguish at 1,300 miles' remove, from a series of college dorm rooms in Cambridge, Mass.)

BTW, some friends of mine who hailed from Philly swiped the banner that had hung over Broad Street, brought it back up to Boston, and unfurled it in front of my apartment building for me to see when I got home from my job the day after the victory parade. Talk about rubbing it in.

Speaking of sports teams, though, pick up the December 435 when it comes out. I know the Star's been there before, but I thought I'd drop in on a little piece of Kansas City plunked down in deepest South Philly.

As for "direct flights from Europe": the "do we really need to rebuild KCI?" thread is over there ----> Having now flown into KCI post-9/11 when I returned for my 40th high school reunion (Pem-Day '76) in September, I want to add my vote to the "Yes" column. The drive-to-your-gate concept was revolutionary and remains very convenient, but the terminals aren't deep enough from entrance to jetway to accommodate the post-9/11 security theater stuff, and that stuff in turn means that once you're past security, unless you fly certain airlines (coughSouthwestcough), kiss any amenities goodbye while you wait for your flight.
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Old 11-26-2016, 08:10 AM
 
976 posts, read 1,118,660 times
Reputation: 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I'm probably going to echo what KC_Sleuth and kcmo have said, but as a native Kansas Citian now residing in Philadelphia, I think I can provide some additional perspective and nuance.

(BTW, Hartfordd, when I was in grade school, I maintained a pen-pal relationship with a boy who lived in the Paris suburb of St.-Denis for a while. I think that led to my choosing French as my foreign language in high school (more Americans take Spanish than French where they take a foreign language for reasons that should be obvious). The letters stopped after I included a photo of myself in one of the ones I sent. I'm African-American. I have no idea how well the National Front's doing in Paris' northern suburbs, which I hear are pretty working-class.)

Back to the topic: I frequently draw parallels between my native and adopted states and cities, and I also consider myself an evangelist for my real hometown in my adopted one, especially since I've gone back to KC and have seen just how lively it's become. (I bought a T-shirt on my most recent visit that reads, "I lived in Kansas City BEFORE it was cool.")

KC has always been a very pleasant place to live. The knock on it when I was growing up there was, "It's a nice place to live, but I wouldn't want to visit there." That's definitely no longer the case.

Philadelphia likewise had a historical reputation for being rather boring, as reflected in a one-liner from native son W.C. Fields: "I went to Philadelphia on a Sunday, but it was closed." (The epitaph he wanted on his grave - "On the whole, I'd rather be in Philadelphia" - also reflects this). And in the 33 years since I moved to Philly, it too has gotten a lot livelier and more interesting. You never saw sidewalks packed with people going to shops and restaurants after about 6 p.m. in the 1980s. Since the late 1990s, that's the normal state of affairs around here. Likewise, Westport - the oldest part of Kansas City - was much sleepier in the 1970s than it is now, and again, the sidewalks are thronged with revelers - or were on the weekend nights I've visited.

I also say of my adopted home town that it's "a small town masquerading as a big city." For a city of 1.5 million (that's the core city population, which is only about 750,000 fewer than the population of metropolitan Kansas City), it has a strong everyone-knows-everyone-else quality about it, and local newscasters pass for Celebrities. Were I a native Philadelphian, I wouldn't look down my nose at KC, and none of the Philly natives who know me make that mistake.

The ones I know who have been to both KC and StL far prefer KC, btw.

What Philly has that KC doesn't:
--real rapid transit
--a bigger industrial legacy (which is not to say that KC doesn't have industry; anyone who's been through Fairfax or the Blue River Valley should know otherwise)
--a longer history, including its role as the nation's birthplace
--a more diverse culinary scene (but KC's made great strides in that department)
--about 4 million more residents in the metropolitan area

What KC has that Phiily doesn't:
--ease of getting around, albeit it's drive-everywhere outside a very small part of the city (this is perhaps the biggest obstacle to my returning there, as I'm definitely a subway junkie. Love the streetcar, which seems just right for KC, though, as I wrote in that column in 435).
--much, much, MUCH better barbecue
--more greenery, better distributed throughout the city (Philly's largely resides in its parks)
--Midwestern glad-to-meet-you friendliness

I'd rate them even on:
--charming small-town suburbs surrounding them
--municipal inferiority complexes, though I'd say KC has pretty much gotten over its. Philly's still working its way through the issue; having NYC for a next-door neighbor doesn't help, although we love stories about New Yorkers relocating to Philly in search of a lively city they can afford to live in

By the way, someone mentioned Lawrence above? Midwestern college towns are way cool, and Lawrence is no exception to that rule. And were it not for KU's presence, its county would probably be part of the KC metro area now, as the city's only a half hour from downtown Kansas City. (For many years, Leavenworth County, home to the first city in Kansas, wasn't either thanks to the Army base and Federal penitentiary there.)

BTW, KC_Sleuth, how old are you? You're the first person in quite a while that I've heard use the phrase "Nelson Art Gallery" to refer to the city's preeminent art museum. That's what I called it growing up, even though its full technical name has always been "The William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art-Mary Atkins Museum of Fine Arts" and its management and publicity materials now call it the "Nelson-Atkins," correcting a serious historical slight.

For anyone who cares: I cut my teeth in my profession working at the newspaper Nelson founded.
Thank's you very much for all of the informations, it's interessant.
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Old 11-27-2016, 10:02 AM
 
4 posts, read 3,277 times
Reputation: 12
I felt it was much more racist than most other big cities I have visited in the US.
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