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Old 05-05-2009, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,797 posts, read 28,255,217 times
Reputation: 8831

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Twice now I have heard this expression and I find it unusual.

Someone describes himself as being from 'away'. Yet when questioned closer, they were born and raised within 10 miles, and have lived here for 25 years or more.

The other day a fellow came to our home, looking to see if we needed any rototilling done. When I got to talking to him, he said that he was also from 'away'. He grew up in Old Town, graduated from Old Town Highschool, but once he was married they decided to move 'away'. So they moved to Argyle, and they have lived here for 30 years.

Old Town and Argyle border each other. When he made his big move, he did not move hundreds of miles away, he only moved a few miles.

He stayed within the same county, his children attend the same schools that he attended as a child.

This is the second time that an Argyle resident has told me that he is from 'away'. The previous guy was also raised in Old Town and crossed the town line into Argyle.

I think that in most places, if you settle in an area within 50 miles of your hometown you would still be considered a local.

What exactly is 'away'?

If I cross the street have I gone 'away'?

Obviously crossing a town line is 'away'. So I am curious.

Thanks
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Old 05-05-2009, 08:36 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,140 posts, read 21,999,212 times
Reputation: 16210
I also ran into that when I was living in Aroostook County. Prime example was when one of our little band of friends was going to move "away." Everybody was all upset we would see him anymore and how he was moving away. When I asked the obvious question of where he was moving to, it was to Presque Isle from Caribou. 12 miles. I couldn't believe it and even got up and walked away telling everybody there were frigging crazy to carry on like he was moving across the Country.

I wish I had an answer for you, but in 20 years I never did figure out exactly where "away" was. It could be a few miles, it could be 1/2 around the world, made no difference that I could see. I am anxious to see other comments on this as well.
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Old 05-05-2009, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
4,053 posts, read 3,230,741 times
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As a non-Mainer (but frequent visitor), I've always thought of "from away" as meaning someone [1] visiting Maine, or [2] living in Maine, but not born in Maine.

I did some searching, and according to the Quoddy Loop Downeast/Maritime Lexicon.....

Quote:
from away (adverb) [See Flatlander]

If you can't claim that at least three generations of your ancestors lived here--or if your ancestors are from here, but you've moved away and then returned--then you're from away. If you've moved here--even if from the next community--then you're from away.
The "here" in that definition seems to be the greater Passamaquoddy Bay area (as taken from the Quoddy Loop homepage) and therefore "from away" - at least according to this one definition - is meant to include part of Maine and part of Canada.

However, according to the Wicked Good Guide to Mainah English:

Quote:
From Away

adj., People who are not native Mainah's.
(Mainah's should be Mainahs, but the definition is one that fits my experiences with this phrase)
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Old 05-05-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: God's Country, Maine
2,052 posts, read 2,862,696 times
Reputation: 1269
Application to Live in Maine
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Old 05-05-2009, 11:35 AM
 
Location: God's Country, Maine
2,052 posts, read 2,862,696 times
Reputation: 1269
Upon moving to any town in Maine, the residents will immediately approach you to determine your ancestral heritage. This age old ritual is not so much to make you feel welcome, but to help the residents determine your classification. Thus, the indoctrination to Maine culture begins.

In order to be a "Mainer" (pl. "Mainerds,") or "Maniac," you have to meet ONE and ONLY ONE qualification (no EXCEPTIONS) to claim the "prestigious" classification of being a Mainer.

YOU NEED TO BE BORN IN THE STATE OF MAINE !!!!


It does not matter how long you have lived in the state, how long your family has lived in the state, nor does it matter that your ancestors came over on the Mayflower in 1620 (that matters most in Massachusetts). The ability to drive in massive amounts of snow and ice proves nothing, except that you are not a threat to society and may own a 4-wheel drive.

If you were not born in the state, you will forever be referred to as a person "FROM AWAY."
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Old 05-05-2009, 11:39 AM
 
Location: God's Country, Maine
2,052 posts, read 2,862,696 times
Reputation: 1269
YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you can name all four seasons, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if they are Tourist, Foliage, Ski and Mud.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you own flannel shirts, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if you wear one with a tie.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you know the back roads, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if you drive them to avoid the toll booth.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you own a pick-up truck, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if the truck is 4-wheel drive,
has a gun rack, a plow on the front and a dog in the back.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you attend church suppers, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if that's considered a night out on the town.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you live in a white cape, but YOU'RE
REALLY FROM MAINE if there is a picket fence
around the house, a garden in the back, a woodpile somewhere, and
some appliances on the front lawn.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you say "Ames-es", but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if you do all your shopping there.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you read the Union Leader, but YOU'RE
REALLY FROM MAINE if you believe it.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you know everyone in town, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if they're all related to you.

YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you go to the dump on saturday, but
YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if you leave with more than what
you brought.
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Old 05-05-2009, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,239 posts, read 8,023,046 times
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Most Maine towns have a strong sense of community, but if you don't have two or three generations in the local graveyard you are "from away". When I moved to this town 26 years ago I went to the town office for something and the first selectman was shaking his finger at a citizen and telling him he shouldn't have anything to say about the issue because he was a newcomer in town. He had been here 25 years.

All that said, newcomers are welcome. You can be included as much as you would like. You can hold office in town. If you stray from what is expected you will be politely told that it is not done that way here. You can be a "real Mainer" even if you are from away and not a native.
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Old 05-05-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,661 posts, read 7,684,734 times
Reputation: 4671
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmyankee View Post
YOU'RE FROM MAINE if you can name all four seasons, but YOU'RE REALLY FROM MAINE if they are Tourist, Foliage, Ski and Mud.

You're really from Maine if you know there are not four seasons. Bonus points if you can name all five starting with the current season.
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Old 05-05-2009, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,239 posts, read 8,023,046 times
Reputation: 4258
There are two versions of that:

Spring, summer, fall, winter and Mud Time.

Spring, summer, almost winter, winter, winter nearly over
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Old 05-05-2009, 01:55 PM
 
669 posts, read 1,123,440 times
Reputation: 704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post

You're really from Maine if you know there are not four seasons. Bonus points if you can name all five starting with the current season.
I would say the current season wouldn't count because it's only lately that we've had one....but here goes...

fishing season
bird season
deer season
ice fishing season

moose season has been around almost long enough to count
turkey season needs another 10 years under it's belt before it's not "from away"
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