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Old 10-06-2015, 07:06 PM
 
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Tour New York's Oldest Home, a Pastoral Oasis for 360 Years - House Calls - Curbed NY

This one in East Elmhurst is still lived in. Mid 1600s.
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY (Crown Heights/Weeksville)
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In Brooklyn, some of the oldest individual houses are in Flatbush.

Unique, but part of a museum (Weeksville Heritage Museum), are 3 houses built by black freemen during the Civil War that were rescued in the 1960's from a wrecking ball, moved alongside each other and preserved to period.

Least changed: For large apartment buildings, "handsome beyond compare.." see these 3 beauties in the Crown Heights North Historic District Built in the 1890's by architects Louis Seitz and Montrose Morris, their ornate exteriors are well preserved. I think they're still lived in today as apartments. From the street, the architectural detail is perfect, although some of the inside architecture is now gone.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/re...te/28scap.html

In Washington Heights, look around W. 160th - W. 162nd at Riverside Drive for several turn-of-century apartment buildings with a nice look.

Great expert resource for all of this: Municipal Arts Society (MAS).

Are you planning a film or something?

Last edited by BrightRabbit; 10-06-2015 at 07:47 PM..
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:55 PM
 
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the Dakota

constructed from 1880-1884

https://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/centr...nd-street/4930
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:18 PM
 
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Default Chinatown tenements

There are several tenements in central Chinatown that date from the 1840s, and were tenements during the 1863 draft riots. They are still residential buildings.
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:16 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlem resident View Post
There are a lot of old buildings in Harlem, and I lived most of my life in a building downtown built around 1910.
I'm guessing it was a 4-6 story walk up?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
Why do you exclude museums when that's exactly what most of the oldest surviving residences in the city have been converted to ? If they hadn't been they probably wouldn't be here anymore.

I think the place with the largest collection of colonial and federal houses is probably Staten Island.
I also know there is a house in Douglaston Queens that dates to the early 1700's…it's the Van Wyck House and still a residence as far as I know. Most of the old Dutch houses remaining in Brooklyn are museums.There are quite a few wood frame houses from the 1800's scattered here and there in upper Manhattan but they are only 150 years old.Miraculously Unscathed by Time, This Historic*Wooden UES Townhouse*Seeks Tenants | 6sqft

Does Gracie Mansion qualify under you strict guidelines ? It dates to about 1800 and is a museum but it is also still a residence.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelius_Van_Wyck_House

"The Cornelius Van Wyck House is an 18th-century Dutch Colonial home located on the shore of Little Neck Bay in the Douglaston section of Queens in New York City. This house overlooks Little Neck Bay and is well known for both its age and architecture, and especially for its original owners.[2] It was designated as a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The Cornelius Van Wyck House is considered to be the "most impressive architectural remnant of the early Dutch Culture" in New York.[2]"

There are probably a lot of really old house from the early 19th century in Brooklyn that have been totally bastardized and covered with aluminum siding so you would never know.
I'm excluding museums and the like because I'm curious about apartment buildings that still serve as apartment buildings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inquring81 View Post
There are several tenements in central Chinatown that date from the 1840s, and were tenements during the 1863 draft riots. They are still residential buildings.
I'd be interested to find out more!

I wonder if any of the original features in those buildings, and the other really old ones, remain aside from the building itself.
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:20 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,547,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightRabbit View Post
In Brooklyn, some of the oldest individual houses are in Flatbush.

Unique, but part of a museum (Weeksville Heritage Museum), are 3 houses built by black freemen during the Civil War that were rescued in the 1960's from a wrecking ball, moved alongside each other and preserved to period.

Least changed: For large apartment buildings, "handsome beyond compare.." see these 3 beauties in the Crown Heights North Historic District Built in the 1890's by architects Louis Seitz and Montrose Morris, their ornate exteriors are well preserved. I think they're still lived in today as apartments. From the street, the architectural detail is perfect, although some of the inside architecture is now gone.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/re...te/28scap.html

In Washington Heights, look around W. 160th - W. 162nd at Riverside Drive for several turn-of-century apartment buildings with a nice look.

Great expert resource for all of this: Municipal Arts Society (MAS).

Are you planning a film or something?
I've actually been to the Weeksville Houses, it was very interesting.

And no I'm not planning a film, I was just curious about this subjectt. Thanks for your input!
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Old 10-08-2015, 01:07 AM
 
18,236 posts, read 11,645,412 times
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Once again Google is your friend: The 20 Oldest Buildings in New York City - The Way Back Machine - Curbed NY

There are scores if not hundreds of residential buildings from the 1800's still standing and in use all over Manhattan and the rest of NYC. On Third Avenue and 83rd Street across from Food Emporium there is a building with a top date stone that reads 1863 or some such.

You also have commercial buildings (mostly low rise) all over the City (especially in Manhattan) that once were townhouses/brownstones but have been converted to retail throughout and or that on ground floor with offices above. All over Chelsea and lower mid-town especially 23rd Street to 34th Street from about Lexington going west you find a good number of such buildings. You have to look carefully and or search out the original CofO but they are there.

One way to determine a larger residential buildings age is to see which of the tenement laws it conforms to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Law_Tenement

This can be difficult from the street because the façades of a row of buildings hides interior air spaces.

Case in point right now Icon Properties is tearing down half a block along Second Avenue between 80th and 81st. For perhaps the first time in over a hundred years when those buildings went up you can see what things looked like behind the façade. New York
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Old 10-08-2015, 07:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,737 posts, read 39,610,543 times
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West Village has some early 19th century row houses. My guess is Brooklyn would as good for old residential housing stock as Manhattan, as more in Manhattan was demolished for new or denser housing stock. But as said, Lower East Side has a lot of old tenements left.
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Old 10-08-2015, 07:40 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,627,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Once again Google is your friend: The 20 Oldest Buildings in New York City - The Way Back Machine - Curbed NY

There are scores if not hundreds of residential buildings from the 1800's still standing and in use all over Manhattan and the rest of NYC. On Third Avenue and 83rd Street across from Food Emporium there is a building with a top date stone that reads 1863 or some such.

You also have commercial buildings (mostly low rise) all over the City (especially in Manhattan) that once were townhouses/brownstones but have been converted to retail throughout and or that on ground floor with offices above. All over Chelsea and lower mid-town especially 23rd Street to 34th Street from about Lexington going west you find a good number of such buildings. You have to look carefully and or search out the original CofO but they are there.

One way to determine a larger residential buildings age is to see which of the tenement laws it conforms to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Law_Tenement

This can be difficult from the street because the façades of a row of buildings hides interior air spaces.

Case in point right now Icon Properties is tearing down half a block along Second Avenue between 80th and 81st. For perhaps the first time in over a hundred years when those buildings went up you can see what things looked like behind the façade. New York

You're way off, there are thousands and thousands of buildings from the 1800's because that includes all the buildings put up in 1880s-1899. A huge number of the brownstones you see for a start, all the Victorians etc..

Early 1800/s and before - that's where its just "scores if not hundreds"
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Old 10-08-2015, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,129 posts, read 26,407,309 times
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The City built from South to North, so for old Manhattan homes, look at brownstones South of Canal Street.

Outlying boroughs were wooden farmhouses, long since destroyed by fire, termites or developers.


Oldest House in City, 1652:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyckoff_House
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