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Old 12-22-2015, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Long Island
32,616 posts, read 13,758,081 times
Reputation: 6914

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I want my state to be able to capture rain water and sell it to other states. We get a lot of rain. Maybe we could have a water pipeline.

These states are the wettest based on average precipitation per year:

Hawaii
Louisiana
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Tennessee
Georgia
Arkansas
Connecticut and NC (tie)
South Carolina

Rainiest States in the US - Current Results

There is no population explosion. Populations are decreasing.
Assuming it could be accomplished it still does not address the wastefulness of agriculture and other industries. Population has exceeded what can be supported in many areas without major reform in water use.

Water beneath the ground and above are really one and the same, rainfall needs to replenish the acquifers. Anytime we try to improve on nature it doesn't turn out well.
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:16 AM
 
44,248 posts, read 17,643,401 times
Reputation: 18644
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMotorsport64 View Post
The problems facing the Desert SW & California isn't a lack of water, its misuse of water appropriation. I.e., in Arizona about 70% of that water goes into agriculture, a lot of the agriculture is then exported out of the U.S. California has the same problem.
The problem with these places are people who move there, but want to live a lifestyle that is incompatible with the environment. That is the issue.

If people want to live in the desert, they are going to have to give up the green lawns, and everything else that you would otherwise never see in those places.
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Long Island
32,616 posts, read 13,758,081 times
Reputation: 6914
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
Massive agra factories and bottled water companies are wasting most of it. Regardless, we should be working on less expensive ways to desalinize sea water.
Australia installed desalinization plants in just about every territory about 5 years ago and now they sit idle at quite a cost.

Nocookies | The Australian

Last edited by Goodnight; 12-22-2015 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:41 AM
 
7,040 posts, read 4,028,555 times
Reputation: 6164
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
The problem with these places are people who move there, but want to live a lifestyle that is incompatible with the environment. That is the issue.

If people want to live in the desert, they are going to have to give up the green lawns, and everything else that you would otherwise never see in those places.
You're still oversimplifying it. Water use for lawns is a drop in the bucket. Water exists in these places, Phoenix exists at the confluence of three different rivers that were damned for Ranching and big AG. The area was a riparian habitat and still is in small locations where the rivers still trickle like the San Pedro or Gila. Western water policy is more extensive than simply cutting back on things like Lawns.

You ignore both facts and the post, stopping lawns in Phoenix, for example, would amount to a 5% reduction in water supplies for AZ at most, switching to drip irrigation alone would easily surpass that figure.

There is more to the desert than the dirt and since most desert cities are located in valleys up against large mountains with snow fall, the water supplies are derived from snow melt. It isn't incompatible. I do agree that people should conserve, but with heat islands and the need for shade, there is no problem with drought tolerant plants used.

The Sonoran Desert is home to various natural grasses that are drought tolerant. It is home to various tree species that are used.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:39 AM
 
44,248 posts, read 17,643,401 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMotorsport64 View Post
You're still oversimplifying it.
Nope. You simply don't care to address it.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:41 AM
 
11,617 posts, read 5,894,308 times
Reputation: 1694
I didn't read this thread, but I do know that oil is thicker than water.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:42 AM
 
7,040 posts, read 4,028,555 times
Reputation: 6164
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
Nope. You simply don't care to address it.
It was addressed try reading.

By your logic because electricity doesn't occur naturally where you live and is imported via a grid that you will simply have to do without it.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:46 AM
 
16,665 posts, read 9,042,516 times
Reputation: 6736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Bottled water is a drop in the bucket, so to speak. Agriculture is the big drain. Hard to grow crops that people need to eat without water. Then add the crops grown for alternative fuels and feeding livestock, and any drought has a huge effect.
We need agriculture to feed humans. Is the answer discouraging population growth or finding better ways to get clean drinking water?
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:51 AM
 
29,549 posts, read 16,302,340 times
Reputation: 13709
Water should be privatized and priced in accordance with supply and demand. That would eliminate much of the frivolous usage or wasting on unprofitable ventures.
Price controls create shortages.

Also, what impact does the ethanol mandate have on water usage? It's past time to end that scam.
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Old 12-22-2015, 12:35 PM
 
Location: DC
6,502 posts, read 6,419,176 times
Reputation: 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
how much per gallon would desalination cost if one were forced to use windmills? likely a lot more than your quoted price above.
Nope. Swing and a miss by the t-bagger team.
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