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Old 03-08-2007, 11:30 PM
 
3,155 posts, read 7,036,639 times
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I've read a few post about funny NC expressions. Recently while cleaning out some file cabinets I ran across a little booklet my Mom gave me in the late 80s or early 90s: The Dictionary of The Queen's English. It was published by NC Travel and Tourism Division. The following section of words are definitions of old English words and phrases still used in NC today. (So blame the British for these funny sayings. )

arn = iron
arter= after
ast = asked
ball= bullet
barn = born
bile= boil (a fav of my grandmother. She biled potatoes.)
blowed = blown and blew
chainy = china (rhymns with rainy)
cheer = chair
claphat = hasty
cowcumber = cucumber
drap = drop
fit = fought
fitten = fit ... This food isn't fitten to eat.
flang = flung
git = get
hit = it
hoigh = high (pronoucned hoy). There was a hoigh tide today.
ill-convenient = inconvenient
jine= join (rhymns w/ pine)
learn = teach
mought = might
nary = not any
obleege = oblige
oisland=island (pronounced oy-land)
peart = for feeling well. Another Granny fav.
pizen = poison
recken = for believe
salet = salad
slue = for many
smidgen = a bit
tee-toncey = tiny
toide = tide

So the next time you can't understand a local, blame the British.
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Old 03-09-2007, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
1,518 posts, read 3,849,633 times
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Funny I had that same book, but sold it many years ago at a yard sale. Maybe your mom bought it from me ;-) I always wish I kept that :-)
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Old 03-09-2007, 06:27 PM
 
3,155 posts, read 7,036,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DebbieF View Post
Funny I had that same book, but sold it many years ago at a yard sale. Maybe your mom bought it from me ;-) I always wish I kept that :-)
Debbie, my mom is the Queen of yard sales... so it could very well have been her.
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Old 03-10-2007, 08:18 AM
 
95 posts, read 193,341 times
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That's funny. My grandpa used a lot of those sayings. He was born in Oklahoma, raised in Texas. His ancestors were from NC. They left abt 1830. It shows you how stuff like that can stick for generations.
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Old 04-05-2009, 02:40 AM
 
Location: England
2,138 posts, read 1,699,883 times
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That's strange, I live in West Sussex & I have'nt heard any of those words used in my part of England.
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Old 04-05-2009, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,545 posts, read 2,788,187 times
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stranger is that you're on the Raleigh, NC forum replying to a 2-year-old thread
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Old 04-05-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
671 posts, read 1,741,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDXmom View Post
I've read a few post about funny NC expressions. Recently while cleaning out some file cabinets I ran across a little booklet my Mom gave me in the late 80s or early 90s: The Dictionary of The Queen's English. It was published by NC Travel and Tourism Division. The following section of words are definitions of old English words and phrases still used in NC today. (So blame the British for these funny sayings. )

arn = iron
arter= after
ast = asked
ball= bullet
barn = born
bile= boil (a fav of my grandmother. She biled potatoes.)
blowed = blown and blew
chainy = china (rhymns with rainy)
cheer = chair
claphat = hasty
cowcumber = cucumber
drap = drop
fit = fought
fitten = fit ... This food isn't fitten to eat.
flang = flung
git = get
hit = it
hoigh = high (pronoucned hoy). There was a hoigh tide today.
ill-convenient = inconvenient
jine= join (rhymns w/ pine)
learn = teach
mought = might
nary = not any
obleege = oblige
oisland=island (pronounced oy-land)
peart = for feeling well. Another Granny fav.
pizen = poison
recken = for believe
salet = salad
slue = for many
smidgen = a bit
tee-toncey = tiny
toide = tide

So the next time you can't understand a local, blame the British.
Well I'm British and I havent heard any of these! If it's the Queen's English it's not the current queen, maybe Queen Elizabeth I .
It looks more like an NC dialect of English
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Old 04-05-2009, 03:28 PM
 
931 posts, read 1,801,089 times
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I watched a show on PBS regarding this same subject...The different dialects of NC and how the people that are native to the coast, specifically the smaller islands still talk with the same dialect that the settlers used. I don't think it was referring to the current Queen. It was pretty interesting.
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
16 posts, read 36,406 times
Reputation: 19
This short and fun read has a chapter on the myth of ancient vestigial forms of English surviving in isolated places:
Amazon.com: Language Myths: Laurie Bauer, Peter Trudgill: Books

It's a good book all around, and appeals to non-specialists.
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Old 04-06-2009, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
8,178 posts, read 10,803,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarnerMama View Post
I watched a show on PBS regarding this same subject...The different dialects of NC and how the people that are native to the coast, specifically the smaller islands still talk with the same dialect that the settlers used. I don't think it was referring to the current Queen. It was pretty interesting.
None of those terms are "NC English"--they refer to Ocracoke, an isolated island that was known, for many years, for its bizarre dialect that, legend had it, was the closest surviving dialect to Elizebethan English still around (I believe that's been mostly debunked). And, in the past 20 years or so, Ocracoke has had a lot more access to the mainland and I doubt any but the oldest residents even talk like that. Still, there are some interesting terminologies and accents! There is a book Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks, written a few years ago, all about the Ocracoke dialect.

But again, ONLY on Ocracoke or the OuterBanks would you find people talking like that (and much less so now)--it is NOT a "general NC accent".
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