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Old 02-28-2016, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Dothan AL
1,450 posts, read 876,291 times
Reputation: 991

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I have been trying to figure this our for a friend of my sister who became disabled as teenager. She collects SSDI under her father's social security. She has never worked, was disabled before she was 22, never married, lives in her parent's home, both who are now deceased. She is retirement age at 66 years.

I am not up on this and the net always leads me to the basic simple questions; it does not understand I am looking for 'adult dependent children', or survivor, who are now close to retirement age.
Found this:


"This conversion to retiree status applies to anyone who receives any type of SSDI

benefit. This includes Disability Insurance Beneficiaries (DIB), Childhood Disability
Beneficiaries (CDB), also known as Disabled Adult Children (DAC), Disabled
Widow(er) Beneficiaries (DWB), and disabled surviving divorced spouse beneficia-
ries. All the same guidelines apply to all retirees after they reach full retirement age,
regardless of how their original claim was classified. In SSA terms a DAC is either an
auxiliary or survivor beneficiary, and a Disabled Widow(er) a survivor beneficiary;
however, at FRA they are all retirees for SSA program purposes"

Now, is this saying if someone was disabled in childhood, has no work history, receives SSDI under a deceased parent's social security claim, SS number, she would, at age 66, given she is born in 1951, would continue to receive the benefit as a retirement income?
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:05 AM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,232 posts, read 8,395,972 times
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I'm no expert, but based on info at these 2 SSA webpages regarding Survivor's Benefits, it appears the adult child, in this case, would receive 75% of the father's benefit as an "disabled adult child Survivor" benefit. (not 100% like a spouse would)

https://www.socialsecurity.gov/plann...nyourown4.html

"And your child can get benefits at any age if he or she was disabled before age 22 and remains disabled"

https://www.socialsecurity.gov/plann...nyourown5.html

"These are examples of monthly benefit payments:
Widow or widower, full retirement age or older --100 percent of your benefit amount;
Widow or widower, age 60 to full retirement age -- 71 to 99 percent of your basic amount;
Disabled widow or widower, age 50 through 59 -- 71 percent;
Widow or widower, any age, caring for a child under age 16 -- 75 percent.
A child under age 18 (19 if still in elementary or secondary school) or disabled -- 75 percent.

Of course you should call or visit SSA to confirm.
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:16 PM
 
632 posts, read 403,194 times
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yes.
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Old 02-29-2016, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Dothan AL
1,450 posts, read 876,291 times
Reputation: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky3vicky View Post
yes.
Yes, they will transition to SAA same as one who is receiving disability under their own social security number?
I know it is 75 % and that is not the question, the question is does the adult child over age 66 continue to coverage? SSA or stay on SSDI?
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Old 03-01-2016, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,538 posts, read 43,992,643 times
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She does NOT stay on SSDI. She receives Social Security benefits, instead.
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Old 03-01-2016, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,943,598 times
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Well, it says they're all FRA for retirement purposes. I don't know what FRA means. But, it seems to read, that once they are eligible for retirement benefits, their disability benefits end.

Just go talk to someone at the Social Security office.
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Dothan AL
1,450 posts, read 876,291 times
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FRA means full retirement age. I have told her the transition to SSA is what happens at age 66. If that is not enough for her, then she will have to make the call. The waiting on the phone is a bit much for me, and she is able to do this.

I wish to thank you all for the help.
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,943,598 times
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My understanding is that the transition from social security disability to social security retirement is at age 62, because they can force the recipient to convert to early retirement benefits. You should check this out.

Can SSI force someone to apply for early retirement benefits? | Disability Secrets
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Dothan AL
1,450 posts, read 876,291 times
Reputation: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
My understanding is that the transition from social security disability to social security retirement is at age 62, because they can force the recipient to convert to early retirement benefits. You should check this out.

Can SSI force someone to apply for early retirement benefits? | Disability Secrets

I have done this thoughtfully. What you are looking at is for those applying for social security at age 62, not someone who has been on social security disability as a dependent since childhood.

Her concern is, "What happens when I am 66" because she as never worked? From my searches, it seems all those on SSDI, whether under one's own social security, or as a dependent, transition is automatic at full retirement age.

At this point, there is no longer any CDR because at that age, one is not expected to be able to work due to age. She as been worried about the CDR for years, even though Social Security has assured her that her condition will not deem her fit for work.

I hear from her on this insecurity a few times every year.
Thanks
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,943,598 times
Reputation: 35219
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDocKat View Post
I have done this thoughtfully. What you are looking at is for those applying for social security at age 62, not someone who has been on social security disability as a dependent since childhood.

Her concern is, "What happens when I am 66" because she as never worked? From my searches, it seems all those on SSDI, whether under one's own social security, or as a dependent, transition is automatic at full retirement age.

At this point, there is no longer any CDR because at that age, one is not expected to be able to work due to age. She as been worried about the CDR for years, even though Social Security has assured her that her condition will not deem her fit for work.

I hear from her on this insecurity a few times every year.
Thanks
What is CDR? It's annoying that you expect people to know what these things mean.

For people who don't qualify for social security disability, they go on SSI. I believe it's the same for those who go on social security retirement. SSI is for those who don't have enough work credits.
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