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Old 04-13-2019, 04:48 AM
 
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I know that Venus has some of the most hostile environments in the Solar System, with surface temperatures in excess of 400C (800F) and pressures 90 times greater than on Earth’s surface, but I still feel that the place has been neglected for far too long.

Beyond the issues mentioned above, I think that another reason it’s not garnering much attention is because of its location. Venus is the second planet from the Sun, which makes it less interesting to future human colonization. The Moon and Mars can also serve as great stops towards any manned mission targeting the outer reaches of the Solar System. Venus value is therefore sadly mitigated. Does this play any role?

I would really love for there to be a new mission to Venus, preferably one that involves sending another set of rovers to it, like the Venera’s of the 70’s.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:20 AM
Status: "Enjoying life..." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Sure. Venus it's a very interesting planet. But where is the money? Why explore a
planet where clouds are made of sulfuric acid, its surface is so hot it would melt lead, and its winds constantly hit hurricane-force speeds?
The Russians tried, but no robots can survive there for longer than 2 hrs. We don't have the right technology here, yet. Such expedition is still too expensive for such short exploration.

However, NASA and Russians Roscosmos are partnering to bring together scientists to discuss a new type of Venus mission: a lander that could survive the planet's deadly surface for not just days, but months, sending back crucial scientific knowledge about the hellish world.
It wouldn't be before 2026, if even.
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Old 04-13-2019, 05:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
However, NASA and Russians Roscosmos are partnering to bring together scientists to discuss a new type of Venus mission: a lander that could survive the planet's deadly surface for not just days, but months, sending back crucial scientific knowledge about the hellish world.
It wouldn't be before 2026, if even.
I like that idea. I remember reading some "pie in the sky" idea of sending people and they would live in a balloon high in the Venus atmosphere, where the pressure wouldn't crush them. I rather see some sort of lander that is capable of surviving months, that would be awesome!
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Old 04-14-2019, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
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Venus would have absolutely been the perfect opportunity for colonization if not for its lethal atmosphere. But current technologies do not allow us to remove the 90 atm surface pressure not reduce the 900 degree F (480 C) temperatures caused by its thick atomsphere. Unless and until we can invent something to subduct, siphon, and/or store MASSIVE quantities of CO2 with minimal, remote-controlled equipmemt on a global scale with minimal cost, Venus will continue to be 100% useless for any human exploration, let alone habitation. Even the tallest mountains on Venus are still apparently 40 atm and scorching hot (assuming we could even land exactly on top safetly without crashing into the side). That's a real bummer to realize considering Venus is Earth's twin planet.

I too agree that Venus gets so little attention. Probably because of the aforementioned. As far as we know, other than Earth, only Venus, Titan, and Mars have a rocky surface with any meaningful atmosphere. Which makes them special in a sense. I think the moon and Mars are more valuable for our time and money. The moon only because it is so gosh darn close relative to everything else. Maybe our best bet is artificial gravity space station.
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Old 04-15-2019, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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Venus would be an opportunity for a new type of planetary exploration: deploying a pair of aerostats to explore the habitable part of the atmosphere, possibly in combination with scanning equipment to view the ground below from close range.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:00 PM
 
2,959 posts, read 1,122,120 times
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Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
Venus would be an opportunity for a new type of planetary exploration: deploying a pair of aerostats to explore the habitable part of the atmosphere, possibly in combination with scanning equipment to view the ground below from close range.
Yeah, I’m interested in it not just because of its surface, but also the atmosphere.
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