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Old 01-30-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,396 posts, read 59,890,532 times
Reputation: 54044

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I work on our cars in the alley.
Oh, I bet your neighbors love you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
It pains me to admit that when I am adequately funded I will buy a pre-packaged Ikea room or two
I'm going for a kitchen.

Quote:
(who travels with a tape measure, I know)
I have a purse-sized one. You never know when you're going to need to measure something, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
Now where I live currently, for some reason everyone goes to Starbucks
There are no Starbucks in Chicago? LOL

Quote:
why for the sake of vibrancy would you drive 15 minutes to Starbucks or downtown to read a paper in a vibrant setting
Why would anyone drive anywhere to read the paper? I find this rather ridiculous.

Stay home and save money!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
Space is kind of like a pickup truck... people can do without much of it as long as they have a friend that lets them borrow theirs from time to time. I have friends and siblings that are very happy with their small apartments, yet they'll all be watching the Superbowl at my house, and when old friends are in town they know they always have a comfortable place to stay for their whole family so they go out of their way to visit.
You've got that right! Among my in-laws, I'm the only one with a yard. Guess who gets to host the Fourth of July and Labor Day picnics, while the aunts and uncles and cousins and brothers-in-law brag about their urban lifestyles?
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,109,839 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Oh, I bet your neighbors love you!
Nobody has garages so it's not seen as out of the ordinary. It's also not the type of neighborhood where this would be frowned on.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,917 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Oh, I bet your neighbors love you!


I'm going for a kitchen.


I have a purse-sized one. You never know when you're going to need to measure something, right?


There are no Starbucks in Chicago? LOL


Why would anyone drive anywhere to read the paper? I find this rather ridiculous.

Stay home and save money!


You've got that right! Among my in-laws, I'm the only one with a yard. Guess who gets to host the Fourth of July and Labor Day picnics, while the aunts and uncles and cousins and brothers-in-law brag about their urban lifestyles?
My point being people go to Starbucks to get on their computers, don't even get anything. My other point with Chicago was it didnt take the name "starbucks," for a place to have a crowd. Where I stayed in particular had one Starbucks along a 12 block stretch, many other places along those blocks weren't empty to say the least.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,890,482 times
Reputation: 4691
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Really, you can live quite comfortably at 500sf/person and maybe throw in an addition 100sf/pet.

A family of 4 with a couple of cats and a dog could live quite well in a 2300sf house (indeed, this would be considered luxurious in Manhattan). Anything more than that is unneeded luxury or ostentatious display of wealth.

Debate.
Luxuries are, by definition, "unneeded." That's what separates them from necessities. Nonetheless, "luxury" and "ostentation" are two very different things. My parents, brother, and I grew up in a 4,700 square foot home, which was appropriately sized relative to its 3/4-acre lot, an example of "tasteful custom construction" built right before the ill-fated McMansion era. We certainly didn't "need" all that space, but because there was a semi-open floorplan that emphasized larger functional rooms over compartmentalized clutter, we used almost all of it on a regular basis. In addition, the decoration scheme was very understated--lots of neutral tones, few accessories or knickknacks--that gave it a pleasingly understated look. Granted, after that my dad's new girlfriend (a so-called "interior designer") got her grubby paws on the place, she transformed it into a gross, opulent mess, as if her "handiwork" were taken straight out of an allegorical Nouveau riche playbook.

Either way, it's very possible to live in a large space without heaping on the schmaltz.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:59 AM
 
2,145 posts, read 1,590,181 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
Luxuries are, by definition, "unneeded." That's what separates them from necessities. Nonetheless, "luxury" and "ostentation" are two very different things. My parents, brother, and I grew up in a 4,700 square foot home, which was appropriately sized relative to its 3/4-acre lot, an example of "tasteful custom construction" built right before the ill-fated McMansion era. We certainly didn't "need" all that space, but because there was a semi-open floorplan that emphasized larger functional rooms over compartmentalized clutter, we used almost all of it on a regular basis. In addition, the decoration scheme was very understated--lots of neutral tones, few accessories or knickknacks--that gave it a pleasingly understated look. Granted, after that my dad's new girlfriend (a so-called "interior designer") got her grubby paws on the place, she transformed it into a gross, opulent mess, as if her "handiwork" were taken straight out of an allegorical Nouveau riche playbook.

Either way, it's very possible to live in a large space without heaping on the schmaltz.
So big is ok as long as its just a vast area of unadorned drywall painted in a muted color? I've seen warehouses that sound more homey than that.
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,890,482 times
Reputation: 4691
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
So big is ok as long as its just a vast area of unadorned drywall painted in a muted color? I've seen warehouses that sound more homey than that.
(1) That's not at all what it looked like.
(2) This is a rule that applies to dwellings of any size, as far as opulence (and in my personal opinion, taste) goes.

While the decoration scheme isn't exact, the interior pictures found at this link do a decent job approximating the decoration scale of my childhood home.

http://blogdesign-blogs.blogspot.com...main-line.html

Main differences: our living rooms were carpeted and the downstairs kitchen/hallways were part marble and part tile.
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I work on our cars in the alley. A garage would be nice, but not essential. I probably spend less than 10 days a year under the hood. I don't do major repairs. I've never had one, so I guess I don't miss it. Luckily our winters are so flukey, it can be 20 one day and 50 the next.
.
I was thinking about this last night. When we lived in Champaign-Urbana, IL, it seemed like every dwelling had some sort of off-street parking where one could work on a car, if one so desired. Sometimes that was a driveway. I can't remember living anywhere there that didn't have someplace off the street for the cars. Apt. complexes had parking lots and/or garages.
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:49 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I was thinking about this last night. When we lived in Champaign-Urbana, IL, it seemed like every dwelling had some sort of off-street parking where one could work on a car, if one so desired. Sometimes that was a driveway. I can't remember living anywhere there that didn't have someplace off the street for the cars. Apt. complexes had parking lots and/or garages.
I would have thought that's not uncommon in Pittsburgh with all the rowhouses. Here, most have driveways but a few streets on one block, maybe half of the attached houses have no off-street parking. Probably a few other spots in town with the same situation as well as those that live in apartments above stores in the center of town (one can rent a municipal spot for $25/month*) but probably not allowed to work on your car there).

*not sure of the exact amount
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:13 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,109,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I was thinking about this last night. When we lived in Champaign-Urbana, IL, it seemed like every dwelling had some sort of off-street parking where one could work on a car, if one so desired. Sometimes that was a driveway. I can't remember living anywhere there that didn't have someplace off the street for the cars. Apt. complexes had parking lots and/or garages.
I guess it ain't as Urban(a) as you thought!

Some have created driveways in their backyards on my street. I haven't seen the need as we have ample public parking. It just isn't an issue.

The 1880-1920 rowhouses don't have parking, because most didn't have cars. The "deluxe" rowhome areas starting about 1925 had tiny unconnected garages and driveways in the rear (usually at basement level). Some postwar rowhomes (mine) did have driveways but only the fancier ones had garages. Mine is basic.
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Old 02-04-2013, 07:36 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
Reputation: 14811
someone working on their car (if changing tires count) on the street:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=2533+...FvQkf5LPVYyWwQ

Not that it's legal, but I doubt anyone cares if done quickly. Residents don't have any place off street, I'd assume.
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