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Old 08-13-2008, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Greater PDX
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I wonder what City Data posters think is the most urban "feeling" suburb in the US? I'm not referring to major cities near other major cities (like Fort Worth or St Paul) but true suburbs. A couple nominees:

Bellevue, WA: yes there are a lot of subdivisions of houses, but is there a suburb with a downtown skyline to match it?

Addison, TX: the Tollway corridor doesn't feel like any suburb in the traditional sense.
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Old 08-13-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Location: moving again
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Bethesda, MD seems like the most Urban suburb of DC imo. Everything about it seems urban to me
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Old 08-13-2008, 10:41 PM
 
Location: outer boroughs, NYC
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If you count Hudson County, NJ as a suburb, then I think it would be that, hands down. But Hudson County includes Jersey City, which is more of a city-near-a-city. The rest of the county (Hoboken, Weehawken, etc), follows a similar development pattern. Bayonne is more suburban, so that may count.

Also Cambridge, MA - but once again, is that a "suburb?" Sort of.

If you just include no-doubt suburbs, two that come to mind are White Plains, NY and Evanston, IL.
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Old 08-13-2008, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Greater PDX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neonwattagelimit View Post
Also Cambridge, MA - but once again, is that a "suburb?" Sort of.
Good call on Cambridge...I totally spaced on it. But Mass Ave is probably the most urban surface street I've ever been on in a suburb.
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I think the vast majority of "inner ring" suburbs are quite urban. The only way one would know you had left Denver and entered say, Englewood, would be to see a sign informing you of same. Also, Aurora, CO is very urban. I had a job interview once at the health dept there - had to go through a metal detector.
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Depends what you mean by "urban" and "suburban." In fact, I'd say the vast majority of the Los Angeles metro area could be described as an "urban suburb."
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:24 PM
 
Location: outer boroughs, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Depends what you mean by "urban" and "suburban." In fact, I'd say the vast majority of the Los Angeles metro area could be described as an "urban suburb."
Good point. Much of LA is like one giant inner-ring suburb.
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Old 08-14-2008, 01:08 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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Union City, New Jersey has to rank up there - the most densely populated city in the U.S. About 53,000 per square mile.

Union City, New Jersey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-14-2008, 03:28 AM
 
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Uh, most of Northern and Southern New Jersey (Newark, Jersey City, Patterson, Union City, Camden, etc.), Yonkers, New York, most of the area around Los Angeles, and so on.
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Old 08-14-2008, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
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Cambridge, Somerville, Brookline--Massachusetts
Hamtramck, Highland Park---Michigan
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