U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Can the smaller places hold their own?
Yes 27 69.23%
No 12 30.77%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-26-2013, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,804 posts, read 9,088,175 times
Reputation: 8121

Advertisements

Can the smaller cities hold their own in terms of amenities against the larger cities. My cut off for small to large is anything above or below the 5 million mark. Basically if it's below 5 million (CSA) then it's in the smaller camp, if it's larger then it's in the big city camp.

Amenities list:
- Parks
- Shopping (Yeah feel free to talk about Barney's, Nordstrom, so on, whatever floats your boat I suppose)
- Amphitheaters/concert venues
- Sports
- Sports venues
- Airports
- Restaurants (the variety, the total number, the atmosphere)
- Amusement parks/Water parks/boardwalks/piers
- Zoos
- Museums
- Colleges (Sports related only/sports stadiums)
- Art scene
- Hotels
- Casinos
- Outdoors stuff (hiking, biking, swimming)
- Festivals (film, music, cultural)
- Neighborhoods (high rise, mansion, quiet peaceful)
- Nightlife
- Alcohol scene

We're staying away from politics, weather/climate, cost of living, or any sort of discussion on economy. Just strictly on what the cities have or don't have.

Now you can compare them as a collective group against each other or split them up and match them with their counterparts, well I'll provide the counterpart list if anyone cares.

Some matches:
- Denver versus Dallas
- Minneapolis versus Philadelphia
- Tampa versus Houston
- Seattle versus Boston
- Cleveland versus Detroit
- San Diego versus Miami
- Phoenix versus Atlanta

Larger places:
- Boston: 7,991,371
- Philadelphia: 7,129,428
- Dallas: 7,095,411
- Miami: 6,375,434
- Houston: 6,371,677
- Atlanta: 6,092,295
- Detroit: 5,311,449

Smaller places:
- Seattle: 4,399,332
- Tampa: 4,376,239
- Phoenix: 4,329,534
- Minneapolis: 3,759,978
- Cleveland: 3,497,711
- Denver: 3,214,218
- San Diego: 3,177,063

Let's keep it 100 and keep it to only the stuff I'm asking for in this thread. No more and no less. If there are any other amenities I missed upon, feel free to add. Otherwise, the credentials of the thread are pretty straightforward.

PICTURES ARE WELCOME!

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 09-26-2013 at 11:43 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-27-2013, 03:08 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,978 posts, read 4,109,015 times
Reputation: 3340
San Diego is considered small? Anyone from SoCal would know that separating SD from the LA/OC region is silly. It's basically connected with nearly continual urban development between the two. It's an hour drive from anywhere in OC to SD for crying out loud...

Seattle, I would argue, packs the strongest punch of all the small cities. Not long at all till it joins the ranks.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,804 posts, read 9,088,175 times
Reputation: 8121
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
San Diego is considered small?
Oh yeah. Zero doubt in my mind.

Outside the United States for some examples, our 3 millions feel like 1.5's, this entire country along with Australia and Canada are a mess on the world when it comes to lack of density aside from a small less than handful of cities. Then you have some cities that have okay densities (maybe like 11,000-15,000 citywide) but they're so crime ridden and filled with so much "undesirable" areas that border looking like Chernobyl post-nuclear disaster that it just makes one sad. You think "3 million" makes you feel 3 million? What a laugh to the Valencias and Lyons of the world. Megacities are big cities, hypercities are really big cities, supercities are in a class of their own. From 5-10 million, medium sized. Smaller than 5 million, pretty damn small, all in my opinion. San Diego feels like a resort for families more than it feels like a city, coming from someone that truly loves the living hell out of the place.

That's okay, cute places get all the love in the world anyway. LOL. People love cute, it sells postcards.

By the way, why don't you do more than just state Seattle packs the strongest punch. Maybe you didn't get the thread, I'm not talking GDP or climate or that nonsense. Just amenities. Tell me, does Seattle have an NBA or NHL? So, tell me again, how's it so far clear cut victory for Seattle? Let's also get into the quirks of each and every single one of these 14 cities. Let's take inventory of all the W's, Ritz Carlton's, Mandarin's, everything to debunk these preconceived declarations of victory.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 09-27-2013 at 05:02 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Austell, Georgia
2,173 posts, read 3,261,734 times
Reputation: 2111
If you take out Philadelphia and Boston the smaller metros could easily hold their own. None compare to the density, history, transit, and proximity to other great cities. That gives Boston and Philadelphia the edge. The other cities don't have much that seperate them from the smaller metros IMHO. Seattle, Phoenix, Minneapolis and Denver can easily hold their own against the likes of Miami, Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 06:43 AM
 
542 posts, read 1,486,788 times
Reputation: 907
this is a very bizarre question the way it's worded. pls consider revising
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 07:36 AM
 
11,332 posts, read 14,084,726 times
Reputation: 6894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_show View Post
this is a very bizarre question the way it's worded. pls consider revising
I'm with you, I'm not following.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,798,733 times
Reputation: 4315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATUMRE75 View Post
If you take out Philadelphia and Boston the smaller metros could easily hold their own. None compare to the density, history, transit, and proximity to other great cities. That gives Boston and Philadelphia the edge. The other cities don't have much that seperate them from the smaller metros IMHO. Seattle, Phoenix, Minneapolis and Denver can easily hold their own against the likes of Miami, Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas.
This is my take as well. Boston and Philly are a SOLID tier above, and not just in terms of population, but amenities that you only start to see in the most global of U.S. cities. However, the amenities available in Dallas, Houston, Atlanta or Miami can mostly be found in places like Seattle, Minneapolis, Denver, Phoenix, etc. I won't say they're equal, on average (some places like Seattle might even have MORE amenities than those cities), but they're certainly not like twice as great as their smaller counterparts. In other words, at least with this list of cities, you start to see diminishing returns on quality or amenities once you get past the 2.0-2.5 million mark (depending on whether a city is the epicenter of a larger region, like the four smaller metros noted above are). If there were a chart you'd see a curve that was rising from left to right at slower and slower levels for each level of population.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 08:24 AM
 
1,636 posts, read 2,337,630 times
Reputation: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATUMRE75 View Post
If you take out Philadelphia and Boston the smaller metros could easily hold their own. None compare to the density, history, transit, and proximity to other great cities. That gives Boston and Philadelphia the edge. The other cities don't have much that seperate them from the smaller metros IMHO. Seattle, Phoenix, Minneapolis and Denver can easily hold their own against the likes of Miami, Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas.
^Couldn't have said it better myself. Boston and Philly are holding it down for the "larger" cities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 08:28 AM
 
Location: NJ
414 posts, read 472,887 times
Reputation: 128
philly is kinda ratchet tho
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,390 posts, read 25,595,297 times
Reputation: 5762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Code Lyoko View Post
Oh yeah. Zero doubt in my mind.

Outside the United States for some examples, our 3 millions feel like 1.5's, this entire country along with Australia and Canada are a mess on the world when it comes to lack of density aside from a small less than handful of cities. Then you have some cities that have okay densities (maybe like 11,000-15,000 citywide) but they're so crime ridden and filled with so much "undesirable" areas that border looking like Chernobyl post-nuclear disaster that it just makes one sad. You think "3 million" makes you feel 3 million? What a laugh to the Valencias and Lyons of the world. .
Haha, yes, if I want a rough feel of how big somewhere feels (the city parts) in the U.S. vs Europe I usually double or triple the European cities population against most American cities. Lyon easily feels bigger than all the cities on that list outside Philly and Boston, which are about even. Actually, Lyon might be a bit more developed infrastructure wise to tell the truth.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top