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Old 08-05-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
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Balkan people are vibrant and kind.
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Old 11-21-2013, 04:47 AM
Pov
 
46 posts, read 78,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post

And the language. yeah, it's hard. I got lucky because it was spoken to me as I grew up. Way way way different than 'Ingles'. Way different than the Slavic language too as noted.
I was told that the hungarian is unique language( not part of slavic family) with unknown for sure origin.
I think this is great and if I was hungarian I would feel special.


Id like to say that there is difference between being rude and being reserved.Also a lot of EE and SE dont speak very well english.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:04 PM
 
4,449 posts, read 4,619,209 times
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Quote:
I was told that the hungarian is unique language( not part of slavic family) with unknown for sure origin.
I think this is great and if I was hungarian I would feel special.
Id like to say that there is difference between being rude and being reserved.Also a lot of EE and SE dont speak very well english.
Just some comments...
You know I think learning Magyar is 'hard' but probably as 'hard' as anyone feels it is when learning something compleetely new and forwign to what one is comfortably used to. Of curse it can be done and is done. And that's due to the 'drive' to learn a language. I'd think the biggest thing then in Mgayar is the vowel and consonant inflections that go on in one's mouth can be tough to perform. heheh..when you see or hear a 'gy' construction and you know English that'll get you. All I can say is one must do a little 'roll' in the mouth when saying that 'gy' sound that can be torture at first! But as we know practice makes perfect!..;-)...

And East Europeans as 'reserved'. 'Reserved' could imply noting the conditions. heheh check'em out in a football match between the locals......;-)....Context and environment is all. Just like in any culture. And I do admire those EE and SE's who speak English very well. Never forgot what one individual said to me when learning a langauge. When you do, it just makes you many more 'people' where you can then understand the way of some of the 'others' you come across to in life.
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Old 05-08-2014, 11:07 AM
 
399 posts, read 355,097 times
Reputation: 259
No one smiles in Bulgarian big cities. People need to learn to smile more.
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Munich, Bavaria, Germany
93 posts, read 99,699 times
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Default Austrians are unfriendly

It is interesting that an American Comes to this conclusion too!

I used to live next to the border to Austria in Southern Germany and believe me I unterstand everything they say because my bavarian dialect is closed to the austrian dialect. They don't like us and let us feel it in many ways. One of the crassest pumped my tyres. One of the crassest expectations I made when I was in Innsbruck, Austria at a gasoline Station. I was pumping my tyres and the guy behind me got upset because I was not quick enought to him, so he screamed at me that we (Germans) are all *******s and he would like to beat me up, the only Thing that keeps it from doing it is that it would be a criminal offence. He saw I was German on my licence plate.
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Old 06-22-2014, 11:55 PM
 
Location: classified
1,678 posts, read 3,739,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
the only eastern european country ive been to is hungary

hungarians are both unfriendly and rude

scandanavians are not overly friendly but they are certainly not rude

eastern europeans are more hardened than northern europeans IMO, i would exclude poles who tend to be nice
That's odd because I have been to Budapest and I found people there to be very friendly and/or helpful.
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Old 06-23-2014, 01:17 PM
 
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That's great to hear. Curious if you went to the 'countryside' as well. Lots of Magyars live in towns and /or villages. Another 'Hungary' is there as well. I'd think most if unfamiliar not only with Hungary but also 'Eastern Europe' tend to go to the big cities. That's fine but as others may know when you get away from the urban those countries show another side that really kind of makes you see how people live life another life from your own.
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Old 06-23-2014, 05:39 PM
 
545 posts, read 866,660 times
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From my own experience which is certainly flawed, Eastern Europeans don't have a common identity about this. Polish and Serbs are more extroverted than Northern Europeans but, for example, Estonians and Czech are quite similar.
But the way they are extroverted is different than Southern Europeans. They are more cold about showing their feelings, etc. but as warm with strangers, and more extroverted in private space and about their look.
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Slovakia
202 posts, read 224,690 times
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I would categorise it this way

Eastern Europeans - Russians and other European post-Soviet republics except for Baltic countries.
These people are usually warm, helpful, religiously nationalistic, racists and drunkards.

Baltic countries - Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia they seem to be more "colder", reserved. I have never met anyone from Baltic region so I can't judge.

Southern Europeans - Romania, Bulgaria, former Yugo countries, Albania very helpful people, religiously nationalistic (less perceptible in Romania). Many people of former Yugoslavia except for Slovenians tend to be quite aggressive and rude.
Althought I had heard plenty of bad things about Albanians, those I've met were alway "good" (maybe I am lucky), only one was drug/gun dealer, but the same goes to the Serbians or Bosnians.
But generally speaking southern Euorpeans are quite open and warm.

Central Euorpeans - Poland, Czech republic, Slovakia and Hungary,
Here we play to be Christians but (at least here in Slovakia) less than 20-30% are "true" Christians rest of us don't give a damn about religion especially younger generation doesn't even know how church looks like, Czechs are majorly atheistic. Poeple in central Europe (like everywhere else in former eastern bloc) are drunkards, but very helpful and open, racist and especially in capital cities rude.

This doesn't mean that former eastern bloc is full of rude people who love to be under influecne of alcohol but it's still very perceptible that many people rather drink than read a book here. Younger generation slowly changing the picture.
In general people here tend to be helpful and "door open" type
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:51 AM
 
26,788 posts, read 22,556,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetway View Post
I would categorise it this way

Eastern Europeans - Russians and other European post-Soviet republics except for Baltic countries.
These people are usually warm, helpful, religiously nationalistic, racists and drunkards.


When I think of a CERTAIN type of Russians, I'd be the biggest Russophobe here; I don't consider them "warm" or "helpful" in any way, but "religiously nationalistic" and "racists" - plenty. Hateful like hell as well.
On a flip side - the "other kind" of Russians - they are very warm and helpful; (I can totally understand Boxus when he said that he'd prefer to live somewhere in Ukraine than in Moscow.)
Siberia is probably the same in this respect comparably to Moscow.
Southern Slavs made a somewhat different impression on me; they reminded me of.. well, Caucasians somehow.
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