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Old 11-22-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
32,650 posts, read 48,040,180 times
Reputation: 78427

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Today was plant watering day. The outside temperature was 10 degrees and water out of the faucet was icy cold.

For those who are beginning their indoor plant career, during winter, your plants are better off if you mix the water to get a room temperature water to put on the plants. Extreme cold might shock their roots. It's not worth taking the risk.

I put a few drops of Foliage Pro into the watering can every time I water. That appears to be the correct level of feeding. The plants look good, so they can't be too hungry.
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Old 11-22-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
10,420 posts, read 14,602,965 times
Reputation: 22025
If they stop growing I stop feeding. Since the temperature is lower by a good bit where the plants mostly are I cut back on water as well. I keep them dry during the winter months; I've had good luck doing this. Unless you're using lights your plants will usually be at least partially dormant.

There are, of course, exceptions so learn about each plant. For example, my miniature cattails are sitting on my front porch now. They require a hard freeze every year. Since it was -2 last night this won't be a problem.
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Old 11-22-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Pilot Point, TX
7,874 posts, read 14,179,752 times
Reputation: 4819
Not so much for potted plants, but in-ground plants need to be watered to prevent soil contraction. An icy cold pocket of air at the roots is a really mean thing to do to a little guy.
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Old 11-22-2013, 03:29 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 18,161,108 times
Reputation: 10355
I let the soil in my indoor plants get totally dry in between waterings. I don't feed them. I have house plants that are 15-20 years old.
A few times per winter I put the plants in the tub and turn on the shower.

From now until about April, everything outside is pretty much frozen solid.
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Old 12-07-2013, 09:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,817 posts, read 3,461,778 times
Reputation: 1252
I have some raspberries indoors because it is 30 all week. I thought it might be too cold. I put it under a light all night. Should I just leave it outside? It is about 2 ft tall.
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Old 12-08-2013, 11:14 AM
 
Location: NC
9,361 posts, read 14,107,382 times
Reputation: 20914
Let me drift into this discussion, if you will. I have some very large pots with somewhat fragile shrubs that I have put in the barn over the winter. As the soil dries out, how much water should I add? Enough to drain through? Leave alone? Two pots have regular soil and are about 14 inches diameter. This set of plants likes drained soil. The others are more 'tropical' and are in a potting mix. I have never overwintered them outside before.
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Old 12-08-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,794 posts, read 4,915,303 times
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luv4horses,
How cold is your barn? Tropical plants will die at 40 degrees.
THey don't go dormant, they are tropical.
Try to think of where the plant naturally grows, and what the winter
would be for them.
I can only guess that you have succulents and tropicals in potting mix.
If the barn will drop under 40 at any time during the winter, they will die.
If they aren't tropical, just stick your finger deep in the soil and if it isn't moist,
water it.
If the plant doesn't go dormant, it will slow down a bit if it is cooler where the plant
is located, but it still wants food and water in the winter.
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Old 12-09-2013, 12:51 PM
 
Location: NC
9,361 posts, read 14,107,382 times
Reputation: 20914
My barn is pretty cold, just protects from the wind and frost. These plants had been living their winters in a greenhouse, I believe. Originally I just bought them for the pots, but some online reading led me to give them a chance to overwinter. I have bougainvilla, elephant ear, clivia. There was no room in the house. My zone is only 7b.
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