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Old 06-29-2015, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,625 posts, read 88,346,994 times
Reputation: 46465

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I have read both sides: some, with a lot more experience than me have said: no rocks. Even on CD, Nick says no rocks. I have a couple of books on container planting and they say, either no rocks or not necessary. I didn't use them this time around, but my garden, other than my herbs isn't worth much this year. So I have no idea what is right. I am learning I think and will approach things differently next year.
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Old 06-30-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,778 posts, read 4,110,658 times
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nmnita,
When we know better, we do better.
All I have to say is you don't buy a nice plant from a nursery and get rocks
in the bottom of the pot. And when you buy the gorgeous plant, and its happy and blooming
the nursery that grew it did something right. No ricks, all rich well draining soil, right?
Just saying.
Oh, and for people who are obsessed with raising the PWT, perched water table, just do the
pot in the pot method, put the pot with the plant you have into a slightly bigger pot, and use
the exact same soil for both, and put soil in the larger pot too.
No PWT at all.
Easy Peasy. LOL
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Old 06-30-2015, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Central IL
16,789 posts, read 9,983,411 times
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This may be a bit off-topic but I'm contemplating growing boysenberries in containers and one source said they really like to spread so to put some kind of screen over the holes in the bottom so they don't take root! Anyone ever had this concern?
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Old 06-30-2015, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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You can used wadded up aluminum foil balls, instead of rocks.

Rocks are placed in the bottom of pots to help with drainage. At least that's what I always heard.
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Old 06-30-2015, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,040,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
This may be a bit off-topic but I'm contemplating growing boysenberries in containers and one source said they really like to spread so to put some kind of screen over the holes in the bottom so they don't take root! Anyone ever had this concern?
I once had to have a "non invasive" bamboo. I planted it in the pot with screen all around it. In no time flat I had bamboo all over the place. That's why I don't believe there is a non invasive kind. The roots managed to get out of the drainage holes and the fine screening around it.
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Old 06-30-2015, 08:40 PM
 
48,509 posts, read 86,683,370 times
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My wife always puts stones in bottom of pot over drain hole to make sure it drains well overtime. In time your likely to have to repot because its a pot with fixed soil in it. Sometimes increasing the pot size by if it likes bound roots or whatever.
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Old 06-30-2015, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
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Adding small rocks to the bottom of the pot doesn't hurt and in many cases aids in drainage and aeration.
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Old 07-02-2015, 10:41 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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I thought the stone in the bottom of the pot is simply to keep the soil from falling out of the drainage hole, while still allowing drainage.
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Old 07-03-2015, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,524 posts, read 13,597,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I do a great deal of container gardening. For really large pots I flatten old nursery pots, milk jugs, anything plastic and then cover with either landscape fabric or coco mats so I don't lose any soil but I still have good drainage and plenty room for root development.

I have so many containers I don't want to waste good soil just to fill up a huge pot. I also put peanuts in plastic grocery bags, tie the handles together and stick them in the bottom on big pots.. This way I don't have to deal with loose peanuts when I empty the containers. What a mess that can be. Unless you have high winds I doubt you need weight in any container.
never heard of doing that, does it drain well though.
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