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Old 01-05-2009, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 24,684,065 times
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I am wondering, because I am in zone 7a and planted some of these last summer (only about a foot tall). They thrived. Now they seem to be dying out (tips turning brown). They are stated to be cold hardy down to 0° and we have not been nowhere near that cold. We dropped to 13° twice this year so far and it was only for an hour or so. They are also water loving palms and its been a wet winter here.

Has anyone else ever noticed a "die out" of these during the first year? I am hoping they will come back healthy next spring, but I dont know.

I have had excellent success with other palms like the Windmill palm, Needle Palm and Sabal Birmingham palm for many years.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:14 AM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
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Tennesseestorm, since, as you'd stated, only the tips are brown, these seedlings should be alright.The area of any palm to watch,especially on any of the more tender species after being burnt/nipped by a frost/freeze, is the newest leaf in the center of the crown. If that spear remains green,and continues to unfurl once warmer weather stimulates spring growth,the palm itself should recover fine.

On the other hand, if, the center spear turns black,or easily pulls out,(especially after experiancing a bad freeze) the palm is most likely destined for the compost pile.

With palms, all growth starts in the crown and typically,once this is completely damaged, the palm is gone..its rare for them to regrow after such extensive damage

Since it sounds like your are seeing only wind burn, they should perk up once the weather warms.. at that time, give them a little slow release palm fertilizer to help them along..this should also encourage good establishment through the summer months..
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Old 01-06-2009, 01:40 PM
 
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As si33 stated, they should be fine. When they were younger, my Windmill Palms had brown tips during the Winter.

However, I did protect them for the first few Winters and you might want to do the same, at least to some extent.
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Old 01-06-2009, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 24,684,065 times
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Thanks for the replies. Well, more detail - its about 1/2 way down thats brown on these Sabal Minors. I probably should have protected them this first winter. Hopefully they will be OK.

Yes, I made a fool mistake of planting a Washingtonia here and it perished in December of that year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by si33 View Post
Tennesseestorm, since, as you'd stated, only the tips are brown, these seedlings should be alright.The area of any palm to watch,especially on any of the more tender species after being burnt/nipped by a frost/freeze, is the newest leaf in the center of the crown. If that spear remains green,and continues to unfurl once warmer weather stimulates spring growth,the palm itself should recover fine.

On the other hand, if, the center spear turns black,or easily pulls out,(especially after experiancing a bad freeze) the palm is most likely destined for the compost pile.

With palms, all growth starts in the crown and typically,once this is completely damaged, the palm is gone..its rare for them to regrow after such extensive damage

Since it sounds like your are seeing only wind burn, they should perk up once the weather warms.. at that time, give them a little slow release palm fertilizer to help them along..this should also encourage good establishment through the summer months..
Fortunately I have never had an issue with my Windmill palm during the few years I have had it. I have never even protected it, but it was already about 3 years old when I planted it.

The Sabals were even younger, so I should have protected them, even though its been nowhere near as cold as they have been stated to withstand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
As si33 stated, they should be fine. When they were younger, my Windmill Palms had brown tips during the Winter.

However, I did protect them for the first few Winters and you might want to do the same, at least to some extent.
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Old 01-07-2009, 08:41 AM
 
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I just like to be safe about it. I had to drive 3 hours each way to southern Virginia to purchase my Windmill Palms. Consequently I wanted to give them the best chance considering the PITA it was to procure them.

I want to try a Pindo Palm. Have you attempted that one?
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Old 01-07-2009, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 24,684,065 times
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Oh yes - having to drive that far, I would be careful too. Thankfully for me, there is a greenhouse 21 miles away that stocks Windmills if I ever needed another. Hopefully not, but I have thought about getting another for the lower lawn.

Never have tried a Pindo. I probably would not have any luck with that one, since its a zone 8a tree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I just like to be safe about it. I had to drive 3 hours each way to southern Virginia to purchase my Windmill Palms. Consequently I wanted to give them the best chance considering the PITA it was to procure them.

I want to try a Pindo Palm. Have you attempted that one?
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Old 01-07-2009, 09:42 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
2,035 posts, read 4,667,597 times
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Moth,..regarding Pindo palms,..they are neat,to say the least..and the fruit itself is edible though ive never tried one. As for growing them,they can be a little difficult in humid areas of the country. the pindo cross,( Butyagrus nabonnandii or mule palm) is supposed to take humid areas better than the actual species..There are also at least 3 other Butia species which have only reciently appeared in the trade..not sure on their adaptabillity though..

Still, there are a few,lesser known species worth looking into for cooler areas: Trithrinax campestris,the blue needle palm,is said to be adaptable to zone 7a..Brahea moorei or the Dwarf rock palm is an outstanding dwarf silvery blue grey palm for areas of zone 8a and warmer..The only drawback is that it's still hard to come by at the moment..Lastly,both species of Rhapis,or as they are most commonly known,Lady palms are adaptable to zone 8a under the right conditions..

As for obtaining newer or less common plants..i totally agree that it can be quite a journey getting what youd like to work with..dispite that, you and every other adventurous plant lover out there who aren't afraid of trying stuff which may or may not succeed in their area, are the pioneers or the gardening world, who also have the opportunity to introduce others to stuff they never knew could be grown locally..Really, it has been those people who thought outside of the Privets and junipers only box who have introduced many of the plants we grow today.
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Old 01-08-2009, 07:14 AM
 
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Thanks, both of you.
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