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Old 09-25-2007, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
5,234 posts, read 8,287,265 times
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Is the topography/terrain pretty much the same throughout Iowa? Or are some parts of the state more farmland/cornfields and others more green with trees/hills, etc?
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Old 09-25-2007, 08:46 AM
 
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"The rolling hills of Iowa."

Most people assume that Iowa is flat. But it's extremely hilly. The farm fields just go with the flow. There is a ton of farmland of course, but it's not just flat and dry like you might think in Nebraska or Kansas. Iowa has tons of trees as well. It's a very green state.

As for all throughout...hopefully others can advise but every part of Iowa I've traveled through has been like that.
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Old 09-25-2007, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Iowa City/Dubuque, IA
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Dubuque is very different from other parts of the state in that it has many steep (San-Francisco-type) hills and valleys. There is also a "wall" of 200 foot-high bluffs along the Mississippi River. The city's downtown sits below the bluffs on a large, flat plain, and most neighborhoods are on top of the bluffs. There are a dozen or more ravines that connect the two areas. The hills are unusual for Iowa and the Midwest, but most locals don't notice them, and many of them have excellent views of the river or the downtown.
The city is very "green" and even has large areas of forest (mostly in the ravines) that seperate out the neighborhoods.

As a general rule, the further west one goes in Iowa (but even in Dubuque County), the flatter the land will be, and the fewer trees you'll encounter.

(P.S.: As an example of how steep some of Dubuque's terrain is, there are 2 ski resorts in the area, one is Sundown Mountain just west of the city, and the other is Chestnut Mountain Resort in neighboring Jo Daviess County, Illinois).
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:08 AM
 
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Default falcon271

Iowa has many different terrains. NE Iowa, especially Decorah I believe is the most beautiful part of the state. Most of Iowa has gentle rolling hills, but I have been to SE Iowa around Mt. Pleasant and that is pretty flat. The Loess (sp) Hills area (W,SW) has lots of hills and a pleasant view while driving. If you want to drive through flat farm lands, drive through Nebraska and Kansas. I think Kansas is the flattest that I have ever seen. Iowa is a great place to live IF you can find a decent paying job. I'm looking for a move myself. I have been here since 1971. Time for a change.
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Old 09-25-2007, 10:08 PM
 
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To be disgustingly general, Eastern Iowa has alot of lovely hills, some bluffs, et. cetera. Western Iowa is flat and more featureless.
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Old 09-26-2007, 12:48 PM
 
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western iowa



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Old 09-27-2007, 06:38 PM
 
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Ah, the Loess Hills.
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Old 09-30-2007, 09:48 PM
 
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While Iowa's topography is basically Midwestern (no large bodies of water, no mountains, deserts, etc), there really is some diversity. Northwestern Iowa is flat.....probably the flatest prairie I've ever seen. Excellent farmland is found there and unless you count those along rivers and other streams, there aren't any trees older than 100 or so years of age.

Central and southern Iowa (highway 30 is an approximate dividing line) consists mostly of rolling hills interspersed with flatter farmland. This time of year, it is realy beautiful as the leaves are turing.

Northeast Iowa (the only part I'v never really visited supposedl very hilly with lots of caves etc. along the Mississipi.
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Old 10-01-2007, 12:16 AM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon271 View Post
Iowa has many different terrains. NE Iowa, especially Decorah I believe is the most beautiful part of the state. Most of Iowa has gentle rolling hills, but I have been to SE Iowa around Mt. Pleasant and that is pretty flat. The Loess (sp) Hills area (W,SW) has lots of hills and a pleasant view while driving. If you want to drive through flat farm lands, drive through Nebraska and Kansas. I think Kansas is the flattest that I have ever seen. Iowa is a great place to live IF you can find a decent paying job. I'm looking for a move myself. I have been here since 1971. Time for a change.
Kansas has the Flint Hills. Visit the Konza Prairie Preserve south of Manhattan, KS!

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Old 10-01-2007, 01:05 AM
 
Location: FL
1,318 posts, read 5,474,273 times
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Talking Kansas!!!

THANK YOU Plains10!!!
WHY do people think Kansas is flat?
IGNORANCE!!!!!!!!!
It's got THE FLINT HILLS AND THE RED HILLS !!!!!!!! (Also The Chautauqua Hills & The Smoky Hills but I haven't been to those...)
Open your eyes and your minds people!!!
FLORIDA is FLAT!!!!!!!!!!
KANSAS is NOT!!!!!!!
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