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Old 02-16-2013, 01:13 PM
 
3 posts, read 4,462 times
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Example: Mexico, Pulaski, Hannibal, Canton, Boonville, Clinton, Carthage-My Goodness, compare the counties & map the data: it is amazing-noticed Illinois has very similar names, McComb, Peru, Canton, Carthage, etc., Seems the children of the early colonists carried the village names with them, or the Land Speculators were hard at work. I believe, a large number of settlers came from Virginia, North Carolina, New York, & Pennsylvania. Brother fought brother in the Civil War.

Added note, Carthage, Missouri seems significant for some reason, what is known about this fine city?

Last edited by Joan Mina; 02-16-2013 at 01:15 PM.. Reason: question about a village.
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:46 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,599 posts, read 33,349,950 times
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Correct! Many settlers brought village and state names from whence they came.

Carthage was once the richest city in the country, has an impressive town hall, was the site of several Civil War battles and sits on the old Route 66. Nice place to visit, especially if you like maple trees and Precious Moments things.
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:47 PM
 
1,147 posts, read 1,215,168 times
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Cool fact, I did not know that.
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Old 02-16-2013, 07:06 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
694 posts, read 1,195,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Correct! Many settlers brought village and state names from whence they came.

Carthage was once the richest city in the country, ......
Could I get a source for this? Studied southwest Missouri history most of my life and never heard this before.
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:10 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,599 posts, read 33,349,950 times
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per c
Quote:
Originally Posted by SW Missouri Dave View Post
Could I get a source for this? Studied southwest Missouri history most of my life and never heard this before.
Actually, I should have said it was the richest town per capita by 1900 according to an achitectural survey prepared for the state Department of Natural Resources as reported in A Living History of the Ozarks by Phyllis Rossiter, first published July1992. By the way, it's a great book, even if a bit dated, that I highly recommend for anyone who lives here or is thinking about it.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
694 posts, read 1,195,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
per c

Actually, I should have said it was the richest town per capita by 1900 according to an achitectural survey prepared for the state Department of Natural Resources as reported in A Living History of the Ozarks by Phyllis Rossiter, first published July1992. ....
Too late. Once published on the net it has now become an official 'fact'.

Based on your background I would recommend you look online or buy a book covering the "Young Brothers Massacre". Most law enforcement officers killed in a single gunfight - and third most LEO's killed in a single event. People in Springfield drive by the little house where it happened every day and have no clue what happened there.

I recommend to those that have just moved here - and natives that have lived here for years. If you want to really 'see' Missouri, get off the highways and take the smaller back roads. Unless you are in a hurry. Then please stay on the highway, because I get tired of you tailgating me - and I am sure you are getting tired of that 'Sunday driver' enjoying the scenery and poking along in front of you.

PS - you can not call yourself a true 'Ozarkian' until you can tell your children or grand children the story about the lost Indian boy and why the signs that say "Watch out for Falling Rock".
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Old 03-03-2013, 04:25 AM
 
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Default Missouri

Tell me more, you must have knowledge of Moses Austin and his lead mine in Potosi, his exploits into Texas and Mexico.
Lead to me means ammunition, potash means explosives-that Port in New Orleans is a gateway, Big Trouble brewing around 1815-1830.
Those beautiful stone buildings required craftsmen, stone masons of great skills, and also required politicians with connecions to build the territory. What is your take on how the territory developed?
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:16 AM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,789 posts, read 26,082,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joan Mina View Post
Example: Mexico, Pulaski, Hannibal, Canton, Boonville, Clinton, Carthage-My Goodness, compare the counties & map the data: it is amazing-noticed Illinois has very similar names, McComb, Peru, Canton, Carthage, etc., Seems the children of the early colonists carried the village names with them, or the Land Speculators were hard at work. I believe, a large number of settlers came from Virginia, North Carolina, New York, & Pennsylvania. Brother fought brother in the Civil War.

Added note, Carthage, Missouri seems significant for some reason, what is known about this fine city?

The names with a classical and ancient reference are not specific to upstate NY - or to MO. They were poplar names for both places and people, from the Victorian era (mid 1800s) through out the early 1900s. Names with a classical Greek or Roman sound or historic basis, graced both people and places named at that time.

Neo-Classical influences were also found in architecture. The Civil War happened to fall smack dab in the height of the Victorian era.

Much of upstate NY would fall into that category. Schenectady, Albany, Utica, Rome and Syracuse are others can be found there.

There is an Albany and Rome in Georgia also and classically and ancient named cities also abound in Ohio - Athens and Antioch are but two.

Human beings also bore such names - from Tryphena to Penelope and Atticus and Homer, these names abounded.
Architecture was infused with Corinthian columns and laurel leaves an ancient Greek symbol of victory were embossed above many a Victorian era fireplace.

The entire United States is dotted with cities named Albany and Athens. There are cities of that name in Georgia.

They are not only names found in Upstate NY or Missouri, but in any region of the United States that came of age at that time.
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:03 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,599 posts, read 33,349,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SW Missouri Dave View Post
PS - you can not call yourself a true 'Ozarkian' until you can tell your children or grand children the story about the lost Indian boy and why the signs that say "Watch out for Falling Rock".
Hmmph! Told it to my children. Chief Rolling Boulder sends son Falling Rock out to search for new hunting grounds. Falling Rock never returns. Chief has signs posted throughout the land.

Bigger mystery. How do deer know they're supposed to cross at the signs?
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