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Old 11-30-2013, 08:22 PM
 
Location: S.W.PA
1,361 posts, read 2,573,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamiznluv View Post
Very true and there's also Acadia National Park in Maine also.
I think the OP is looking for dense deciduous forests. Lots of Pine/spruce in Maine and NH which is what gives those forests their density. There are some old growth hardwood forest preserves all around the NE, but as has been noted the density isn't there. The mid-south states- Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri- all have hardwood forests but they're are similar to those in the NE. I'll re-cast my vote for the SE coastal states (in the US anyway).
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Old 12-01-2013, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,906 posts, read 12,700,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo6 View Post
I think the OP is looking for dense deciduous forests. Lots of Pine/spruce in Maine and NH which is what gives those forests their density. There are some old growth hardwood forest preserves all around the NE, but as has been noted the density isn't there. The mid-south states- Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri- all have hardwood forests but they're are similar to those in the NE. I'll re-cast my vote for the SE coastal states (in the US anyway).
Yes they do have some forest that have a fair share of Pine and spruce. But they also have forest thick with hardwood.

I had a chance to talk to a man that sold firewood in Maine several years ago. I also used to sell firewood in PA. Much of our PA forest would only yield 15 to 20 cords per acre. The man I talked to claimed that they would get twice that amount out of their forest. He could have been pulling my leg; but he sounded serious.

I am a retired trucker and spent many miles on the roads in ME and NH. I always felt they had thicker forest. There is probably a state forest service that keeps track of how many board feet are in given acre?
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Old 12-02-2013, 10:51 AM
 
1,176 posts, read 2,149,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circa81 View Post
So you guys are saying aside from the southeast, what I'm looking for doesn't exist in the US?
Do conifers count as "leafy green?"
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Old 12-02-2013, 04:31 PM
 
875 posts, read 1,267,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Fork Fantast View Post
You're up against the logistics of nature here. With deciduous trees you usually get a big crown and a wide root net, which means nothing much grows underneath except for shrubs, so dense forests with deciduous trees becomes a relative concept. Oak woods and beech woods in Europe would come closest to your description, but the older and thicker the trees, the more space between them. Now for conifer trees, that's different. You can have wonderfully dense forests with thick trunks, such as the pine forests n the Northwest mountains, but they won't be leafy! Are you looking for a place to live with dense forest, or something like a picture for a school project?
Great explanation. OP: the density that you are looking for is likely to be found in what is called a boreal forest. In a deciduous forest, the trees compete for light, so they don't grow too close to one another or one will outshade the other. I think that your best bet lies in lowland transition forests. Atlantic white cedar swamps can be very dense and have hardwoods (swamp maple, gum, etc) mixed in to give it a more leafy look. There are also boreal forest lowlands that have birch mixed in that won't compete with the conifers, but will add the leafy look. Birch bark is very white, so it contrasts heavily with the conifer bark.

I tried to copy and insert a few images but had difficulty. Google Atlantic white cedar swamp, boreal forest, boreal swamp, or lowland boreal forest and see what comes up.
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Old 12-02-2013, 05:25 PM
 
173 posts, read 242,017 times
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OP here, I found what I what I was looking for. Thanks guys.
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