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Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
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Old 12-12-2007, 09:23 PM
 
Location: North Raleigh
8 posts, read 41,937 times
Reputation: 15

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I want to clarify my comment above. I meant if you added the 100k to the 450k... not improving the house 100k.

There are a lot of nice homes out there for 500-550k. I wouldn't update any house 100k unless it's inside the beltline and you get it for a song. You can find homes that are close to restuarants and shopping, but it depends on where you want to live and how far from downtown Raleigh you want to be.
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Old 12-12-2007, 09:29 PM
 
3,155 posts, read 10,756,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiR View Post

I wonder what will be next? The Jetson's house???

Vicki
I personally hope something like this is next:
http://livemodern.com/mkd

Or possibly underground pods.... so much cooler in the summer.
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Old 12-13-2007, 04:25 AM
 
551 posts, read 1,875,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDXmom View Post
I personally hope something like this is next:
http://livemodern.com/mkd

Or possibly underground pods.... so much cooler in the summer.
Like hobbits.
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Old 12-13-2007, 06:15 AM
 
4,897 posts, read 18,490,627 times
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i am guessing wake forest might have what you are looking for. mature trees, downtown area, the buildings, etc.
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Old 12-13-2007, 08:58 AM
 
34 posts, read 133,407 times
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If the OP is after a house with good architectural bones and cites DC's Georgetown as an example of the type of neighborhood desired, both architecturally and otherwise, I doubt that the subdivisions that predominate in the Triangle will satisfy, with the possible exception of providing larger lots.

Durham's Trinity Park does seem a more sensible suggestion; in Raleigh, I recommend the historic Oakwood neighborhood (http://www.historicoakwood.org/), which is the oldest section of the city and is directly adjacent to downtown. While it may be lacking in terms of a business district (although downtown itself could have some options), the overall "feel" of the neighborhood and its structures, as well as the makeup of its residents, is probably closer to that of Georgetown than many places in the Triangle (still QUITE different...but everything is relative). Oakwood could stretch your budget a bit, but if you keep your eyes peeled, something doable could become available. Lot size would be the one sacrifice you would probably have to make here.

I don't know whether I'm allowed to post this (let me say sorry in advance if it's verboten!), but I find the property search engine at Prudential Carolinas to be very useful for locating homes with the "bones" it sounds like you enjoy, in that you can search for homes built PRIOR TO a given year (and there's a broad range to choose from), not just AFTER, as is more typical of realtor sites.

Good luck with your search! As others have indicated, the Triangle could be a challenge in terms of meeting all of the needs you noted, but perhaps not an impossible one.
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Old 12-13-2007, 09:15 AM
 
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If you're looking for larger lots, though not necessarily the best convenience, then the spread-out area of Wake County north of 540 (west and east of Rte 50/Creedmoor Rd, up to Falls Lake) is very beautiful. The western neighborhoods get close to the airport noise zone, but even those neighborhoods are at the zone's outer edge (and let's face it, it's RDU, not OHare or even Newark). Wake Forest is really further from the central RTP area and quite far from the unique stuff Chapel Hill and Durham has to offer, but it's still beautiful.

For somewhat smaller lots on average: in Durham, I'd consider the Forest Hills area (near Forest Hills Park)--well located, very walkable, mature trees. It's more a mix of homes (i.e., some are so-so), but still a pretty area. Trinity Park and Club Blvd area in Durham also have a good mix of centrality/walkability with pretty neighborhoods.
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