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Old 01-06-2014, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
35,954 posts, read 35,979,701 times
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Interesting article about the increasing age of home caregiver workers.

Here's a taste of it:

"As demand for senior services provided by nurses' aides, home health aides and other such workers grows with the aging of baby boomers, so are those professions' employment of other seniors. Around the country, senior service agencies are seeing a burgeoning share of older workers. About one-third of Home Instead's 65,000 caregivers are over 60. Visiting Angels, another in-home care provider, says about 30 percent of its workers are over 50. And at least one network, Seniors Helping Seniors, is built entirely on the model of hiring older caregivers."

Growing number of seniors caring for other seniors

Are you surprised by this?
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Old 01-06-2014, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
3,007 posts, read 2,495,983 times
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I am not surprised at all, and it makes sense to me, I would rather have someone over 50 caring for me than someone 20.

I have many medical problems myself but I am still going to be the defacto caregiver for my husband as his Parkinson's gets worse over time and I wish I could find somewhere to get nurses aide training, without the getting a license, on the job training etc. Something that would help me in lifting, turning, helping up after falls, that sort of thing, but I am not in shape to take a nurses aide course and they only have them with full licencing and on the job training.
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Old 01-06-2014, 09:39 AM
Status: "Enjoying the winter" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
34,098 posts, read 62,011,758 times
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Yes, that makes sense. Several of the workers at the adult family home where a relative is cared for are in their early 60s. The people they are caring for are 85-95.
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Old 01-06-2014, 10:45 AM
 
341 posts, read 660,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
I am not surprised at all, and it makes sense to me, I would rather have someone over 50 caring for me than someone 20.

I have many medical problems myself but I am still going to be the defacto caregiver for my husband as his Parkinson's gets worse over time and I wish I could find somewhere to get nurses aide training, without the getting a license, on the job training etc. Something that would help me in lifting, turning, helping up after falls, that sort of thing, but I am not in shape to take a nurses aide course and they only have them with full licencing and on the job training.
Many years ago my mother had a stroke and was in a rehab facility temporarily. She lost total usage of one leg and most usage of one arm. The physical therapists were wonderful in teaching the family how to handle her, including transfers to and from wheel chairs, bathing, etc.

All the tips they gave us were invaluable and made it possible for my dad (with visits from myself and my sister) to stay at home.

Perhaps a few visits from a physical therapist trained in this would be an easier way to get that help.
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Old 01-06-2014, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,082,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Interesting article about the increasing age of home caregiver workers.

Here's a taste of it:

"As demand for senior services provided by nurses' aides, home health aides and other such workers grows with the aging of baby boomers, so are those professions' employment of other seniors. Around the country, senior service agencies are seeing a burgeoning share of older workers. About one-third of Home Instead's 65,000 caregivers are over 60. Visiting Angels, another in-home care provider, says about 30 percent of its workers are over 50. And at least one network, Seniors Helping Seniors, is built entirely on the model of hiring older caregivers."

Growing number of seniors caring for other seniors

Are you surprised by this?
Older caregivers raises a lot of questions. Mainly, strength. Can an older caregiver lift and bathe the patient? What about the risk of falling while attending to the patient, putting both in harm? We have an elder friend with severe arthritis, he can barely move though he's on his feet and still drives. It takes three strong adults to get him in and out of any house or building. Getting the patient to the doctor, in and out of a vehicle, etc...just not good.

The other risk is the caregiver having a stroke or other episode on the job, forgetting when the last meds were (or giving them twice, etc). Leaving the stove on high while rushing to give aid in another room (something that could more likely happen with elder workers). I'm not saying all elder caregivers are going to do these things, it's just all in the risk pool. I can see elder caregivers as companions, though, as they'd have a lot more in common with an elder patient.
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Old 01-06-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,092 posts, read 14,005,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Seniors Caring For Other Seniors

Are you surprised by this?
Not a bit, because it doesn't just pertain to paid caretakers.

If a senior is 80+ or 90+ and has children ... those children are seniors.
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Old 01-06-2014, 03:48 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
27,116 posts, read 45,215,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Interesting article about the increasing age of home caregiver workers.
...

Growing number of seniors caring for other seniors

Are you surprised by this?
No surprise to me, and I'm preparing for it.

I follow senior co-ops pretty closely, and appreciate the USDA report 15 yrs ago that seniors living cooperatively are able to remain 'independent' 10+ yrs longer than those living on their own, in apartments and homes.

Of course all is very individually applicable and we all need to find our own place that fits 'just right'. I keep a 'caretaker' apartment available in my home. It can be used for a 'senior-buddy / caregiver', or by someone I need to hire.

I hope to be part of a 'senior village' of some type by age 80 - 85 +. Mine will be an engaged community / resident owned, not the typical 'Cruise - Ship' Senior living center operated by a 'for-profit'.

Quote:
If a senior is 80+ or 90+ and has children ... those children are seniors.
Ha... just spoke to my mom last night and she was discussing how her kids are now getting 'Senior Discounts'. I assured her she is still 39.. she made sure grandkids NEVER called her Grandma

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 01-06-2014 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 01-07-2014, 12:32 AM
 
1,778 posts, read 2,113,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
No surprise to me, and I'm preparing for it.

I follow senior co-ops pretty closely, and appreciate the USDA report 15 yrs ago that seniors living cooperatively are able to remain 'independent' 10+ yrs longer than those living on their own, in apartments and homes.
You want any help scoping out locations?

As a trial balloon, I would think you'd want to consider omitting the Northeast. Taxes will eat you alive, and the nanny staters will figure out a way to get into your bidness. Every new regulation justifies a new department, requiring patronage staffing by a new host of public sector "workers". As for the incidental paid helpers - you'll have job seekers lining up. Not for the work, necessarily - but to fall on the snow-covered pathways, or to trip while assisting a resident - for the opportunity to sue you.

I lived in CT for 18 years. I know how "the system" works and I know whereof I speak.

Interesting factoid: Virginia has 2.25 x the population of CT. Virginia is home to the majority of the legal staff for the federal bureaucracy and its satellites. Despite that, Virginia has roughly the same number of lawyers as CT has. The per capita ratio of lawyers to civilians is similarly over-weighted in the other Northeast states (including New Jersey). The exceptions are Maine and Vermont.

The surplus Northeast lawyers are looking to sue people and complicate things, because they bill by the hour.

I want in on the action, please keep us abreast of what's afoot! Also, best to you!
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Old 01-07-2014, 03:03 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
27,116 posts, read 45,215,007 times
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I only do TAX FREE states and NH is not on my radar. I also prefer NON-freezer tax free states, so SD and WY have lower preference. BUT... I did just request an application from WY Senior Pioneer Home. $1400 / month living 'independent' in Thermopolis Hot Springs Park!!!

I'm all over that!

I will be concentrating on WA and TX as they each have good senior care systems / governance and recognize homecare as a viable 'supported' option. (some residents will undoubtedly be 'state pay', others private. My BIL has built 4 and starting on #5. We'll see how things progress.

At the moment it doesn't move me too far forward on the project having to work PT in Thailand to get affordable healthcare for an ill DS. I have a few options in the works, but will probably not be able to pursue completion till I'm 'of-SS/ medicare age' That is quite a ways out, since I 'retired' pre age 50. The USA has pulled the 5 very nice HSA options I had planned to use when I retired.
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Old 01-07-2014, 07:28 AM
 
11,181 posts, read 10,421,671 times
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When my grandmother was 85 years old she was caring for seniors ten years younger than her. . . she was quite the gal!
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