U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Sacramento
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-06-2020, 06:19 PM
 
Location: SoCal
18,144 posts, read 8,604,233 times
Reputation: 14941

Advertisements

My mom’s house 1300 sqft, older, but doesn’t repel small because it’s one level.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 02-06-2020 at 07:18 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-06-2020, 06:23 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,843 posts, read 26,632,783 times
Reputation: 9430
Better question is why do you need so much space? Our 1,100 sq foot with two 6 yo's seems like the perfect size, right now at least. I spend a lot of time cleaning it, can't imagine cleaning a house double the size. American's are so wasteful in general it seems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2020, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
9,115 posts, read 9,099,884 times
Reputation: 8024
Why does anyone care what size house others want to live in, big or small?
Some folks like living in beehives, others like some elbow room - particularly for raising families.
To each his own.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2020, 07:05 PM
 
1,146 posts, read 359,403 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
Why does anyone care what size house others want to live in, big or small?
Some folks like living in beehives, others like some elbow room - particularly for raising families.
To each his own.
Why do you care about why others care?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2020, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Riverside Ca
20,909 posts, read 23,315,778 times
Reputation: 32243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixxalot View Post
So I notice looking at older homes how tiny they were built! Like under 1500 square feet. Why? How the heck did people raise families in such places?
Because they didn’t need huge entertainment rooms, Giant tv, pools, 6 bedrooms. Kids bunked two to a room sometimes three. Dad worked, mom was at home. Families maybe had one car. Two if they were rich. Along with a TV. But they also didn’t have 1600 channels full of entertainment
People all over the world raise families in small dwellings

Truthfully Giant homes are a waste. Granted I have 2300 square ft house but that’s about as big as I need it. In fact it’s actually about as big as I would want it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2020, 07:30 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
84,475 posts, read 77,659,990 times
Reputation: 85652
After the Depression, people were happy to have ANY home, even an apartment. The Levittown prototype for suburban living was like a dream come true for many families, and the typical home was under 1000 sq. ft. for a family of 4 or 5.





Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2020, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
9,115 posts, read 9,099,884 times
Reputation: 8024
Quote:
Originally Posted by happygrrrl View Post
Why do you care about why others care?
Brilliant!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2020, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
5,583 posts, read 5,758,432 times
Reputation: 19776
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixxalot View Post
So I notice looking at older homes how tiny they were built! Like under 1500 square feet. Why? How the heck did people raise families in such places?
I grew up in a 3 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom house like that built in 1951 on a slab in Phoenix.

The 3 boys shared a bedroom with bunk beds and the 2 girls had the other bedroom. We had one 40 gal water heater. We learned how to share.

Our living room had one 19 inch monochrome TV with a rabbit ear antenna. There were 4 channels. We had one AM radio and one telephone with a long cord.

We spent most of the time being feral children riding bikes, exploring, playing games, and solving our own problems. Our "Google" was a trip to the public library or reading the World Book Encyclopedia.

We had one car that dad drove to work. Mom spent the day cleaning and cooking. We walked or rode bikes everywhere.

There were few processed foods beyond Campbell soups and a McDonalds hamburger was a very rare treat. Almost nobody was fat.

In summer we went barefoot. We had no AC, just a swampbox cooler.

By todays standards, we would be called poor but we didn't know that.

Modern Americans work way too hard to buy a lot of stuff that they really don't need.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2020, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,859 posts, read 88,742,993 times
Reputation: 46698
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixxalot View Post
So I notice looking at older homes how tiny they were built! Like under 1500 square feet. Why? How the heck did people raise families in such places?
Kids were nor spoiled brats like they are now: they shared bedrooms, sometimes even 3 kids in a bedroom and they or I should say we were not used to the modern day living like today. Our first home when I was a kid was 2 bedrooms, one bath and the bath was located between the 2 bedrooms. We were perfectly satisfied. Then we moved to our 2nd home: eventually we had 4 kids there with only 2 bedrooms and a glassed in porch used as the third. We did have a huge living area, a nice kitchen, large dining room and big back yard. But we still had only 1 bath.

When hubby and I were married our first home had 4 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths and only 1 small eating area which was in the kitchen. We did just fine even though the biggest bedroom was about 11 by 12. We moved just before we had our third child. Never did we feel we were missing anything. Life was just different and so many people didn't even own their homes. We felt lucky that being only in our mid 20s we could buy something cause I was a stay at home mom and we lived on 1 salary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2020, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,859 posts, read 88,742,993 times
Reputation: 46698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
It really depends on which older homes you're looking at. Some were large and spacious, with hallways so wide, they could qualify as an additional room or parlor.

It sounds like you've been looking at homes for lower working-class people, i.e. the "affordable housing" of their day. The new "affordable housing" built today isn't any different: kitchens as a small corner "station" in the combo living/dining room, cramped bedrooms. The size of a home in any era depends on what market/demographic niche they're aimed at.
Oh my goodness no, those homes were not built or occupied by working class families by any means. You obviously were not growing up at that time or lived in a different world. My dad was an electrical engineer with the city of L.A. eventually he got 2 masters degrees and was a retired naval officer at the end o WW2: certainly not working class. The same with most of my friends. All of us, or most of us came from well educated families for those days and lived in a middle income part of Los Angeles. Only a few had large homes. Most of us shared a bedroom with our siblings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Sacramento
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top