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Old 05-16-2008, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh--Home of the 6 time Super Bowl Champions!
11,309 posts, read 10,958,429 times
Reputation: 4913

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Quote:
Originally Posted by scongress1234 View Post
Whatever skills you have, unless they are extremely unique or viable, it will take time to get hired in any industry, including nursing and education.
I disagree with you on this part of your post I guarantee if I rolled into town tomorrow, by Monday afternoon I would have a job as an RN at one of your hospitals It would take less than an hour for them to check my references and license.
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Old 05-17-2008, 11:55 AM
 
746 posts, read 3,415,232 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texanwannabe View Post
I disagree with you on this part of your post I guarantee if I rolled into town tomorrow, by Monday afternoon I would have a job as an RN at one of your hospitals It would take less than an hour for them to check my references and license.
Even if that is the case, the rolling in over the week-end and landing a decent-paying job Monday isn't going to happen for 95% of folks that are tranfering to a city without a job waiting for them. Conventional wisdom says that the higher-paying the job, the longer it will take to land one in a new area devoid of personal contacts. This gentleman's 2 month ongoing job search illustrates that. Austin may have a relatively hot job market, but that needs to be qualified. It leans heavily towards service-orientated, lower-paying jobs, from hospitality on down, and is mostly non-union, without the high-paying manufacturing or industry-based jobs in many northern cities. There also is great competition for the minority that pay well, and many are underemployed in the city due to the same. A hot job market means nothing if one struggles to find a job paying over 40K, while a plethora of 13 an hour jobs give the city the tag of a hot job market. You have to ask, "hot for who?", to put things in perspective. Austin also lacks a traditional financial sector, compared to most cities its' size. Few large corporate headquarters, banking clearinghouses, or financial firms, with the emphasis on hospitality and entertainment.
While some may pick at a few details here, the overaching fact is that Austin has a great lack of jobs over 40K, and gets pegged as a hot job market because of its large number of hospitality, customer service, and other low paying jobs, including government related, that is also reflected in the until recently, low prices for homes in the metro. If money was rolling in, the houses would bear far more, far earlier, than they have. The main point is that a hot job market must be qualified. One making 50 K with full benefits at a UAW plant in Detroit would be far better off than one eaking by with a 13 an hour IRS or call-center job in Austin. Just a matter of perspective is all....

Last edited by scongress1234; 05-17-2008 at 12:07 PM..
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Old 05-17-2008, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh--Home of the 6 time Super Bowl Champions!
11,309 posts, read 10,958,429 times
Reputation: 4913
Quote:
Originally Posted by scongress1234 View Post
Whatever skills you have, unless they are extremely unique or viable, it will take time to get hired in any industry, including nursing and education.
I agree with you on most parts but don't include nursing in your analysis. The fact is, there is a nursing shortage in your state--a severe one at that! I don't consider nursing a low paying job either when most experienced nurses are making upward of $30.00/hr. When a travel company is offering me that kind of money + paying my rent for a fully furnished 1-bdrm apt in your town, that tells a story how severe the shortage actually is!
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Old 05-17-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
2,356 posts, read 6,947,330 times
Reputation: 1007
Quote:
Originally Posted by scongress1234 View Post
One making 50 K with full benefits at a UAW plant in Detroit would be far better off than one eaking by with a 13 an hour IRS or call-center job in Austin. Just a matter of perspective is all....
Except that, well...they would be living in Detroit!
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Old 05-17-2008, 06:20 PM
 
648 posts, read 1,667,190 times
Reputation: 180
Austin is a VERY hard market to break into. Dallas and Houston have thriving economies right now. Try those markets. They are much cheaper compared to Austin.
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Old 05-17-2008, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,847,049 times
Reputation: 556
Austin market for jobs is not so bad. Really have to network. Try going to church, mingle w/ others and see what's out there. I seen lot's and I mean lot's of people get jobs by network. Hate to say it, but it's not what you know; It's "who" you know.

Ok, I confessed!!

I wish I can help but I am not in the sales / marketing field. So my sources would be some weak kung-fu for you.


Check out workintexas = WorkInTexas.com Home: Helping Texans Work Better.

Yahoo Jobs = Jobs in Austin, TX - Yahoo! Hotjobs (http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/job-search?locations=austin%2C+tx&country=USA&industry =&kw= - broken link)

I know that RUDY's BBQ pays $10.00 an hour. Not much, but it beats sitting on your PC looking full time for a job and not getting anywhere.
Take a job and outsource yourself! I worked @ coke part-time , I did it to make some little extra cash, but also did it for my exercise (lost 20 lbs ). You would not believe how many other vendors I meet with and some offer me to join their company. Of course I didn't accept because I am happy @ my full time job right now.

Good luck buddy. I hope you find something!
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Old 05-17-2008, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,847,049 times
Reputation: 556
Quote:
The main point is that a hot job market must be qualified. One making 50 K with full benefits at a UAW plant in Detroit would be far better off than one eaking by with a 13 an hour IRS or call-center job in Austin. Just a matter of perspective is all....
Like we say in Austin, what are you willing to give up?
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Old 05-17-2008, 07:00 PM
 
2,237 posts, read 7,864,941 times
Reputation: 942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mckellyb View Post
Actually, I've found one can be general enough in resume formatting, references, and wording, to not have to rewrite it for every application. That, in and of itself, would be neverending aggrivation.
Having hired over 100 technical people over the past 12 years, I'll have to disagree. Resumes that hit the key words from the job description always get get more interest on the initial review. I can spot a generic resume immediately and lose interest in 95% of them.
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Old 05-17-2008, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,847,049 times
Reputation: 556
Quote:
Originally Posted by achtungpv View Post
Having hired over 100 technical people over the past 12 years, I'll have to disagree. Resumes that hit the key words from the job description always get get more interest on the initial review. I can spot a generic resume immediately and lose interest in 95% of them.

So looking @ the format of a resume you toss and not give that person a chance? Are they fakes?
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Old 05-17-2008, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
369 posts, read 1,565,551 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by achtungpv View Post
Having hired over 100 technical people over the past 12 years, I'll have to disagree. Resumes that hit the key words from the job description always get get more interest on the initial review. I can spot a generic resume immediately and lose interest in 95% of them.
I'm saying it's 100% possible to have a resume which both hits most, if not all, of the keywords necessary to flag it as 'good', and is useable for pretty much any job you're qualified for in the industry being searched.

To each their own, however.
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