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Old 12-05-2009, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
43,278 posts, read 51,772,813 times
Reputation: 35454
Default Eligible for public school education until age 22??

This is the first I've ever heard this - that a student can stay in public high school until the age of 22? Now, a special education student I could understand, but a regular student? Does anyone know if this is a national age limit or just in North Carolina?

West Charlotte tries to move 80 students with few credits - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/local/story/1092352.html - broken link)
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Old 12-05-2009, 04:18 PM
LLN
Status: "If you keep looking back, you can't move forward" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Upstairs closet
3,448 posts, read 3,854,353 times
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This is just too funny. What if you gave a meeting and only 1/2 were in school?

Or how about, the comment on graduating on time. Erhhhh...a little late for that, like 4 years???

Riddle me this, if absenteeism is the great satan, how is putting them anywhere going to help?

And there was a recent post about what is wrong with CMS???

The money spent on these people (can't make myself type kids) could be going to regular kids or high achievers, but no, we are going to spend more on these "students" that are not even kids.

Unbelievable.

And to save the inevitable kook from asking, "What would you do, kick them out?" My answer would be resounding "Yes sir!"

lln
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Old 12-06-2009, 02:30 PM
 
2,547 posts, read 2,152,364 times
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I think it's older in many other states. Texas is 26, I believe. But when you look at the economic realities a lot of kids face: mid-year moves, working full time at a young age, starting kindergarten late, parents on drugs, parents in prison, etc., 22 seems reasonable. But you could specialize it or run it through CPCC.

I think mainly the schools need more vocational programs earlier rather than the focus entirely on straight academics, which is not relevant to most kids' lives. I think you have a lot of kids who know they're never going to college for financial or other reasons. Why not expose them to decent-paying skilled trades that don't require lots of schooling? What happened to auto mechanics, masonry, electrician programs in the high schools?

But villainizing poor people isn't really helpful. Throwing money at overacheivers is fine, and there should be opportunities for gifted students. But most of them aren't going to stay in Charlotte. We'll wind up paying for the underacheivers more in the future.
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Old 12-06-2009, 02:57 PM
 
4,227 posts, read 3,745,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
This is the first I've ever heard this - that a student can stay in public high school until the age of 22? Now, a special education student I could understand, but a regular student? Does anyone know if this is a national age limit or just in North Carolina?

West Charlotte tries to move 80 students with few credits - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/local/story/1092352.html - broken link)
This is federal (national) and has been law for a decade. Looks like another depressing waste of money in 99 percent of the cases. There are no different age requirements for Sp. Ed.
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Old 12-06-2009, 04:52 PM
 
3,050 posts, read 6,746,619 times
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It was that age in CA as well.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Sol System
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I was initially hoping this was a joke , but was sorely mistaken.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
43,278 posts, read 51,772,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coped View Post
I think it's older in many other states. Texas is 26, I believe. But when you look at the economic realities a lot of kids face: mid-year moves, working full time at a young age, starting kindergarten late, parents on drugs, parents in prison, etc., 22 seems reasonable. But you could specialize it or run it through CPCC.

I think mainly the schools need more vocational programs earlier rather than the focus entirely on straight academics, which is not relevant to most kids' lives. I think you have a lot of kids who know they're never going to college for financial or other reasons. Why not expose them to decent-paying skilled trades that don't require lots of schooling? What happened to auto mechanics, masonry, electrician programs in the high schools?

But villainizing poor people isn't really helpful. Throwing money at overacheivers is fine, and there should be opportunities for gifted students. But most of them aren't going to stay in Charlotte. We'll wind up paying for the underacheivers more in the future.
26???? My god, I was married, a mother and had a mortgage by the time I was 26!

I'm sorry, but unless a young person has some real disability they should be able to finish high school by the time they are 19 or even 20, but 22???

I would have a real problem with my 14 year old freshman daughter being in school with a 22 year old man

I am not trying to "villanize" anyone, especially poor people, but if you can't get your dipolma by the time you are out of your teens you should be in a GED program or community college for vocational training - not the local high school.
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:08 AM
 
576 posts, read 1,661,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
26???? My god, I was married, a mother and had a mortgage by the time I was 26!

I'm sorry, but unless a young person has some real disability they should be able to finish high school by the time they are 19 or even 20, but 22???

I would have a real problem with my 14 year old freshman daughter being in school with a 22 year old man


I am not trying to "villanize" anyone, especially poor people, but if you can't get your dipolma by the time you are out of your teens you should be in a GED program or community college for vocational training - not the local high school.


+1 You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to lovesMountains again.
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Old 12-08-2009, 08:45 AM
 
4,227 posts, read 3,745,700 times
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Think about the students that were pulled out of West Charlotte High this week. The ranged from ages 16 through 20 and are being transferred to another school because of behavior and performance problems. If one of these 20 year olds was in the 8th grade, he will be 25 when given a diploma (notice I said "given" and not "earned") if he/she doesn't fail any grades. Just think, if we still had the military draft, a man could be 24 and a senior in high school and be draft exempt. Wow! what a crazy mixed up world, and it is getting better. LOL!
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:37 AM
 
761 posts, read 740,124 times
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In Virginia a person can stay in public schools until age 21 or 22. However, 99% of kids wouldn't do it because if they were that uninterested in education to graduate by age 18 then they will certainly drop out after that.
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